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Old 11-10-2014, 12:10 PM
 
12,700 posts, read 10,548,522 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
I'm surprised no one has mentioned this place yet:

Loving County, Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Interesting place, but based on population statistics in the link it seems it was never highly populated to begin with. 285 was its highest population, and now it's down to like 82. It's definitely weird for me coming from such a dense state, I cannot even imagine that, but it's not like the county lost thousands in droves. It seems to be a rural/dry area that simply never saw great growth to begin with.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:07 PM
 
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Not just Detroit but Flint, Camden, Gary, East St. Louis or New Orleans are good candidates for abandonment. It's probable the people who still live there today don't have the means to move away or have nowhere to go but would move away if they could.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,760,271 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Interesting place, but based on population statistics in the link it seems it was never highly populated to begin with. 285 was its highest population, and now it's down to like 82. It's definitely weird for me coming from such a dense state, I cannot even imagine that, but it's not like the county lost thousands in droves. It seems to be a rural/dry area that simply never saw great growth to begin with.
I only mentioned it because the words "completely depopulate" are in the title of the thread. And seeing as this county is almost completely depopulated, it seemed relevant enough. At one point in time, the county had a population of 600, which is still hardly anything... but when you look at it in the context of percentages, going from 600 to 82 is a pretty steep decline. By 2020 it could be completely devoid of human settlement.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,408,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drro View Post
Not just Detroit but Flint, Camden, Gary, East St. Louis or New Orleans are good candidates for abandonment. It's probable the people who still live there today don't have the means to move away or have nowhere to go but would move away if they could.
No, no they are not. All are/are in major metro areas.

Are there more high school kids on these forums than I thought?
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:06 PM
 
3,974 posts, read 3,510,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
No, no they are not. All are/are in major metro areas.

Are there more high school kids on these forums than I thought?
I feel like it's getting worse...
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Paris
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^^ Not to mention the interesting inclusion of New Orleans which is of course the actual core city of a major MSA...
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma
6,901 posts, read 6,221,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
I only mentioned it because the words "completely depopulate" are in the title of the thread. And seeing as this county is almost completely depopulated, it seemed relevant enough. At one point in time, the county had a population of 600, which is still hardly anything... but when you look at it in the context of percentages, going from 600 to 82 is a pretty steep decline. By 2020 it could be completely devoid of human settlement.
Mentone/Loving County is basically a couple of ranches anymore. Mentone (the town) basically consists of the county offices, post office and a couple of houses. It's not far to Kermit, TX so I assume that it could possibly depopulate if everybody moved over to Kermit.

I think it's pretty much down to a couple of extended families though.
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Old 11-10-2014, 03:52 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddie gein View Post
Mentone/Loving County is basically a couple of ranches anymore. Mentone (the town) basically consists of the county offices, post office and a couple of houses. It's not far to Kermit, TX so I assume that it could possibly depopulate if everybody moved over to Kermit.

I think it's pretty much down to a couple of extended families though.
If it completely empties out, it will probably just become annexed by Reeves county, the same way it was the last time it was completely abandoned (the 1910's).

It amazes me how remote, wide-open, and uninhabited that part of Texas is. The only other part of the lower 48 I can think of that's similarly "untouched" is Eastern Montana.
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Old 11-10-2014, 04:08 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
2,482 posts, read 2,235,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Ok I guess I should not have used it as an example on CD, LOTs of Detroit cheerleaders on here that don't like statements like mine.
I think the real issue is fairness versus the media representation of Detroit. Everyone is always railing on about how Detroit is dead or dying, but the fact of the matter is that Detroit isn't even the major city in America that lost the highest percentage of its peak population; that honor belongs to St. Louis.

I'm not saying the guns should now be turned on St. Louis, but when exactly was the last time you heard people or the media railing on about how St. Louis is dead or dying? Cities like Cleveland, Buffalo, and Pittsburgh have also lost more than half of their peak populations.

Obviously you can analyze other issues between all of those cities to see which one is doing the best and the worst, but population loss alone shouldn't be that measure.
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,529 posts, read 7,487,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
This is completely and laughably inaccurate. You cannot have been to Detroit within the last ten years to have posted something this ridiculous, and if you ever were there, it must have been in the middle of the night.

I am not necessarily a Detroit cheerleader, but I am a truth cheerleader, and the truth is that there are many, many people who are slowly turning Detroit around and deserve credit for that. What they do not deserve is for people who are nowhere near the process and obviously have an ax to grind with the entire state of Michigan to get on internet forums and spew untruths like those above. It is true that Detroit has many beautiful suburbs with much wealth and prosperity. Would wealthy, successful people who could live anywhere stay in Metro Detroit if any of what you posted here was the truth?

The reality is that, while Detroit still has much work to do, large areas have become not only once again livable, but actually quite desirable. There are currently waiting lists for the loft apartments and condos in Midtown and Downtown, and other neighborhoods are seeing urban revival and an influx of people from around the country who want to be part of the exciting rebirth of what was once one of the greatest cities in America. And I can say this because I have actually been there recently and have family who live in some of the beautiful suburbs and have no desire to be anywhere else.

Whenever I read a post like this one, the first thing that comes to mind is, if you're so happy where you moved to, then why do you constantly come on this forum and trash the place that you left? Happy people don't do that. Happy people live and let live and wish others well, regardless of where they choose to live.

Ok I admit that I haven't seen it in 7 years, but I cant believe it changed that much. Maybe I am wrong. I know when I was there I was shocked by the abandoned skyscrapers with windows missing from them. Our group was also aggressively pursued by two vagrants and I believe the only reason something bad did not happen is because an undercover cop flashed a badge and they bolted. He told us we had walked in the wrong direction from the baseball stadium. I was thankful he was there.

The neighborhoods are even worse, my great grandmothers house cannot be found now, the entire neighborhood is gone. It is nothing but foundations with trees growing through them. When I was a kid it was a pretty tree lined street and all the houses had people in them. Two generations of my family lived in Detroit, and all the places they lived in and talked about are either messed up beyond recognition or they are gone completely. I guess that is the axe I have to grind that you talk of. It just makes me mad. I never lived there, but a large part of my family history was there and I guess its just gone too. I wonder how this was ever allowed to happen, and why no one stood up for law and order when something could have been done. I know you think I am exaggerating what I saw, but I didn't. If the amount of redevelopment that some Detroit area posters say is happening is real then its truly a miracle. The place I saw was hopeless. The reason I am so down on Detroit is because all my experiences with it have been negative. Criminals from Detroit have commited crimes against me and other members of my family, I have been threatened by Detroiters for helping push my grandparents broken down car out of a road. Even though I never lived there enough of my family did that I have had too much experience with it. I am sorry your offended by my attitude, but experience has made me feel the way I do. The news reports of the last 10 years have not helped either.

Also I don't have a problem with Michigan and I am not running it down. I admit I am down on Detroit, but not on Michigan. I grew up there and I have no reason to run it down. Michigan is a beautiful state, and I enjoy spending time up there. I do miss the lakes. I did get quite frustrated with some things when I lived up there. I always believed that Detroits problems ruined Michigans reputation and dragged the state down. The politics, the unions and of course places like Detroit and Flint bothered me a lot. That does not mean I hated the place. I do talk about Michigan, both its good and bad, but I don't dislike it. I talk about it because I spent so much time there, that is the only reason.
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