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Old 11-10-2014, 01:34 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,523 posts, read 17,745,743 times
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The classification of the American subregion, Southwest, is not strictly based on physical geography, it is based on a matrix of geographic and cultural factors. One of the chief geographic factors is that it is an interior region. The consensus among geographers is the the western limit of the Southwest subregion is the Mohave desert.

Various other classification criteria such as those used by private organizations may or may not include California and other states as 'southwest' but I prefer to defer to geographers rather than product dstribution models, presence of certain fast food restaurants, or drinking water sources on these matters.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
368 posts, read 399,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Yeah that's true. While California has appealing natural beauty, no question about it, I still prefer the greenery and lushness of Florida. CA is just drab, dry and brown. I also love thunderstorms. I still love it out west though. But 72% of the American population does not live in the West. As such, the centers of employment are extremely limited, primarily to super high cost areas.
I agree with you. While I like Southern California's coast, you can't say that it has the best climate/geography while remaining objective. Many people on this board would say that California has the best climate and that is a fact and there is no room for argument (one of them is even lurking in this thread). While it is nice, I don't believe that it is the utopia it is made out to be. Some people like rain, some like cold weather, some like fall colors, etc.

Being from Houston, I really missed greenery when I lived in Phoenix. I went on a road trip to San Diego and stayed in the Torrey Pines area of Delmar/ La Jolla. I hadn't been to San Diego since I was a child, and didn't remember the geography. I was expecting the pine trees to be similar to the loblolly pines found back in East Texas spreading all the way east to Florida as well as the other parts of the southeast. The pine trees looked "drier" than what I was expecting. While San Diego was beautiful, it lacked the greenery I desired and I was somewhat disappointed.

I'm not bashing California, my father is from there and my favorite uncle and cousins all live there. I just don't believe that it is objectively the best place in the country weather/geography wise.
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Old 11-10-2014, 01:49 PM
 
Location: US
645 posts, read 611,220 times
Reputation: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by SK115 View Post
I agree with you. While I like Southern California's coast, you can't say that it has the best climate/geography while remaining objective. Many people on this board would say that California has the best climate and that is a fact and there is no room for argument (one of them is even lurking in this thread). While it is nice, I don't believe that it is the utopia it is made out to be. Some people like rain, some like cold weather, some like fall colors, etc.
True!
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:14 PM
 
42 posts, read 37,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Yeah that's true. While California has appealing natural beauty, no question about it, I still prefer the greenery and lushness of Florida. CA is just drab, dry and brown. I also love thunderstorms. I still love it out west though. But 72% of the American population does not live in the West. As such, the centers of employment are extremely limited, primarily to super high cost areas.

If you look at employment numbers you find that people who live in rural areas have jobs in a higher degree than those who live in more urban-areas. That is why people have jobs in North Dakota (although lower salaries) than those living in Massachusetts. Then you of course have low-productive rural areas which is prevalent in the South. I will tell you – when it comes to put food on your table I can assure you that you will don’t mind having four seasons and not a permanent Southern California weather.

Low and medium-skilled people are often better off in smaller cities and certain northern rural states than they are big cities. They earn less money but they money comes much further and so they can afford owning a house, a car and basic luxuries they would never have afford in Boston, Washington DC, San Francisco or New York. California has a terrible climate for people “in the middle”. There are two kinds of jobs in California set aside those jobs which are not as sensitive demographical and economics change such as doctors and nurses.

Firstly, you have the high-skilled jobs in for example advanced engineering and then you have the low-skilled jobs like working in a coffee-shop. The jobs in the middle, both in offices (like secretaries) and others are slowly disappearing through technology or replaced by legal or illegal immigrants. What makes California so wealthy is the number of high-end jobs. Still, there are a lot of college graduates who will never find qualified employment. The fact is that even the America upper-middle class is slowly losing out although it is their children who see the reduced wealth and lack of employment.

Anyway, I follow jobs and not what I personally like about a specific city. Sure, I rather live in New York than in Minneapolis but a job is a job and I cannot argue with that.
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: US
645 posts, read 611,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylock View Post
Firstly, you have the high-skilled jobs in for example advanced engineering and then you have the low-skilled jobs like working in a coffee-shop. The jobs in the middle, both in offices (like secretaries) and others are slowly disappearing through technology or replaced by legal or illegal immigrants. What makes California so wealthy is the number of high-end jobs. Still, there are a lot of college graduates who will never find qualified employment. The fact is that even the America upper-middle class is slowly losing out although it is their children who see the reduced wealth and lack of employment.

Anyway, I follow jobs and not what I personally like about a specific city. Sure, I rather live in New York than in Minneapolis but a job is a job and I cannot argue with that.
Illegal immigrants wont be taking up office jobs, wont they? Legal ones will. But legal ones dont take up a citizens place anyways, so that is not a problem at all. But at some point of time, people should be able to choose where they want to live and work, barring a few scenarios.
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Old 11-10-2014, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,129,269 times
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California would be perfect if it simply had the same greenery as the east coast. There is no place in the U.S. that has high density greenery AND perfect, dry 70-dgree sunny weather all year round.
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Old 11-10-2014, 03:34 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
15,470 posts, read 25,425,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
California would be perfect if it simply had the same greenery as the east coast. There is no place in the U.S. that has high density greenery AND perfect, dry 70-degree sunny weather all year round.
Is there anywhere on earth that does? Seems kind of impossible to be dry and 70 degrees year round and green and lush at the same time.
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
368 posts, read 399,153 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
California would be perfect if it simply had the same greenery as the east coast. There is no place in the U.S. that has high density greenery AND perfect, dry 70-dgree sunny weather all year round.
No but much of the coastal south comes pretty close, minus the dryness (which in my opinion is overrated).
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Old 11-10-2014, 07:21 PM
 
12,973 posts, read 12,797,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SK115 View Post
No but much of the coastal south comes pretty close, minus the dryness (which in my opinion is overrated).
Old rule of mine. Never live any where they cover their pools with bug tents.
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
11,810 posts, read 18,810,735 times
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No
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