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Old 11-10-2014, 08:14 PM
 
478 posts, read 650,577 times
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Just got back east after an 11 day road trip from Seattle to San Fran. Spent time in each city, plus hiking/sightseeing in Oregon coast on the way. Gorgeous country, fun cities, really enjoyed my trip.

I had a few interactions though that made me wonder about the west coast sense of humor:

1) I talked to a gas station attendant and asked if he had any water bottles. He knew what I meant, but said "you mean bottled water?" while smiling, I think he was trying to be funny.
2) I asked what an orange/yellow drink in a restaurant that I saw in a container across the room was (i thought it could be mango juice, possibly lemonade, etc), and the response was "we call it orange juice here...", again delivered playfully.
3) My friend asked about a quiche on display, and the clerk retorted "it's an egg pie..."

These are just some examples, but several additional times I found myself similarly being 'corrected' or responded to in a very literal way, but with a sense of fun. These kind of interactions don't normally happen to me back east, so I'm wondering-is this kind of literality as humor a common thing on the west coast?
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Old 11-10-2014, 08:17 PM
 
Location: southern california
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you mean in texas they dont correct you when you make a mistake? excuse me?
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Old 11-10-2014, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I'm wondering if they really didn't understand your confusion and were simply clarifying things. And you just thought they knew what you meant and were making fun of you.

If you asked me if I had any water bottles, I'd assume you meant empty actual bottles or the refillable harder plastic water bottles you can buy (empty). I have never heard anyone call bottled water - water bottles.

It would also seem obvious that a glass of orange juice was a glass of orange juice. They may have thought you were being sarcastic. What was your demeanor? They may have just been taken aback by what they thought was an obvious question, like, "Hey, what is that big orange ball in the sky?" "Uh, we call that the sun here..." Granted, they could have been nicer about it, but they probably thought you were trying to be funny, so they responded in kind.

And if someone asked me what a quiche was, I'd be trying to think of another way to describe a quiche. And egg pie sounds like a good answer to me.

So, were you and your pal acting kind of smart-aleck? Giggling like you don't know why westerners are so weird? Could your demeanor have been off-putting? If not, I think they were just kind of flabbergasted by questions about things they think are obvious, or they were trying to be helpful (in the case of the bottled water and quiche).

Or, they were just being jerks LOL!
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Old 11-11-2014, 11:47 AM
 
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If a customer pointed to orange juice and asked me what it is, I think I pretty much would responded in similar way. But I'm also Californian.

My question is: how would the people in your neck of woods respond?

.
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:18 PM
 
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I'm from the West Coast; I've always called it a quiche.
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Old 11-11-2014, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
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I'm obviously not from the West Coast, but I have never, ever heard the term "egg pie" before. Is that the British term for quiche?
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Old 11-11-2014, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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We called them Quiches when I lived in Texas. We called them quiches when I lived in Connecticut.

Now I live in Washington (state) and they're called quiches here as well. "Egg Pie" does sound very British to me. "Water bottles" is a new one on me too.
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Old 11-11-2014, 01:52 PM
 
300 posts, read 328,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beb0p View Post
If a customer pointed to orange juice and asked me what it is, I think I pretty much would responded in similar way. But I'm also Californian.

My question is: how would the people in your neck of woods respond?

.
I'm from the east coast and "We call it ... here" would come off rude, here. It would most likely be "Oh, that's just ..." Meaning I can see you might think it is something else, but it is just a common item. The "We call it" sounds snooty.
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I'm wondering if they really didn't understand your confusion and were simply clarifying things. And you just thought they knew what you meant and were making fun of you.

If you asked me if I had any water bottles, I'd assume you meant empty actual bottles or the refillable harder plastic water bottles you can buy (empty). I have never heard anyone call bottled water - water bottles.
I agree with NoMore - it's hard to say. I don't get those type of responses, but I'm probably guilty of making them at times.

If you asked me about a 'water bottle' my gut reaction would also be that you were asking about buying a Nalgene or equivalent hard plastic or thermos-type, rather than a disposable bottle of water (Poland Spring/McKenzie Mist/etc.).

In his shoes, I would have also asked for clarification. "We carry bottled water, but we don't carry water bottles" is an important distinction.

I've never heard anyone call a quiche 'egg pie' as nomenclature - it's likely she was just being literal about what it is in response to a question. Possible they were having a chuckle at travelers confused by routine daily items, or maybe you both are stunningly attractive and they were all trying to flirt.

/shrug
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Old 11-11-2014, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,146 posts, read 23,084,529 times
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When you said your friend asked about a quiche on display, I assumed the waitress thought you didn't know what a quiche was, so went for the simpler description, rather than throw a French term at you lol! We call them quiches here. But, if someone asked me what a quiche was, I'd probably say, uh, it's an egg pie... LOL.
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