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Old 11-11-2014, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Southwestern, USA
15,376 posts, read 12,129,606 times
Reputation: 16623

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I confirm the Mem Day planting.
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Old 11-11-2014, 08:32 PM
 
Location: The Berk in Denver, CO USA
14,032 posts, read 20,343,555 times
Reputation: 22754
Kentucky
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Old 11-11-2014, 09:09 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,563 posts, read 39,944,045 times
Reputation: 23699
Berthoud, CO is the 'Garden Spot' of Colorado (get a spot with irrigation canal and water rights)
Rocky Ford (East of Pueblo) is good commercial area
Palisade, CO (or Delta) for mtn region with good growing

Best place in USA would vary... Probably FL or mid valley CA (if you have water).

Great gardening spots exist nearly everywhere (with water)
I have friends who commercially grow in AK, ID, WA, OR, CO, UT, and MT.

I am a commercial grower and Master Gardener in WA. It is VERY easy to grow in PNW compared to my previous farming in CO, NE, WY, We_tern WA and Oregon are wonderful if gardening is king in your life (Yr round is possible). BUT... you ONLY get 100 days of decent weather / yr, and if farming / gardening is prime, you will not get to enjoy those days doing other recreation activities (camping / hiking / boating... )

water? You gotta have water.

Wind and a dry climate can be a huge problem.
Hail in CO and WY can be a heart breaker.
Grasshoppers too!!! They have eaten the paint and the screens off my CO homes. (AFTER they finished off the garden / lawn / trees / orchard, in one night)

Heartbreak and farming are part of the life / finance cycle.

In PNW I will have a gorgeous cherry crop and just before harvest will get a brief rain. (ripe cherries Split / mold)
1 yr of efforts GONE in 20 minutes. Happens about 50% of the time.

Colorado was usually Hail or hoppers. (they often come just prior to harvest when the picking is EZ... late Aug)

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 11-11-2014 at 09:19 PM..
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Old 11-12-2014, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
2,601 posts, read 7,527,672 times
Reputation: 1578
In the US ? maybe Rockport Texas or even further south. One can grow tropical stuff there all year round. I have fruits growing from Indonesia and South Africa alolng with many varieties of banana .

Definitely NOT Colorado although I love Colorado.
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Old 11-12-2014, 07:40 AM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,849,882 times
Reputation: 9138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
One can garden in COLO but access to legal water can be a deal breaker and must be carefully checked for any rural area. Utility water in Colorado is getting more expensive as there's a long history of arcane water laws here in the western states like CO, UT, NM, AZ, NV, CA.
Yet another ignorant statement from a transplant from a riparian Eastern state (the part that I underlined). The "arcane" water laws in the arid West were and are a logical method for allocating a scarce resource. There was not enough to go water to go around, so the "first in use, first in right" system was put in place to encourage development and use of what water resources were available, in part by putting a legal system in place that would establish a market pricing system for water. The Western water rights system has certainly been blamed for what I feel is a gross misallocation of water away from agriculture to irrigating suburban Kentucky Bluegrass lawns in suburbia, but the sad fact is that would have occurred even more rapaciously if the West had instituted a riparian water law system, such as what is in place in the much wetter Eastern United States. Go study a bunch of history on Western water law, like I have, and then you won't be calling the Western water law system "arcane." It actually was pretty enlightened.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:20 AM
 
Location: CO/UT/AZ/NM Catch me if you can!
4,743 posts, read 4,369,323 times
Reputation: 10398
Quote:
Originally Posted by davebarnes View Post
Kentucky
Times 2
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Old 11-12-2014, 12:23 PM
 
20,904 posts, read 39,179,200 times
Reputation: 19193
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
Y.... another ignorant statement from a transplant ....


Now now, there you go again, flogging us nasty transplants for ruining everything.... here's a tissue .... so sad population growth and migration continue.... has since some of my ancestors came over on the Mayflower....the original "pioneers" if you will .... more coming every day. But carry on and dip that old quill pen in your inkwell of bile and let 'er rip. Stomp your feet too and shout gol-dern-it.

IMO the water laws ARE arcane, especially the ridiculous part that makes/made it illegal for people to use the rain water that rolls off their roofs. If that isn't arcane, stupid, illogical and unenforceable I don't know what is. IIRC that aspect of water law was rescinded a few years back but I don't care, this city poke fills his canteen from that new fangled thing called a spigot, all citified like.

How many times do I have to point out that NINETY PERCENT of the water used in COLO is used by big agriculture and only FIVE PERCENT goes to those dastardly bluegrass lawns. If a dude wants to move here and garden, he right well can if he can learn what works in the growing season here. If big ag can grow 11.5 million acres of crops here, so can family farms, if they can figure out the arcane set of laws that govern water use in rural areas.
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Last edited by Yac; 11-20-2014 at 07:05 AM..
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Old 11-12-2014, 02:10 PM
 
8,317 posts, read 25,849,882 times
Reputation: 9138
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east
the water laws ARE arcane, especially the ridiculous part that makes/made it illegal for people to use the rain water that rolls off their roofs. If that isn't arcane, stupid, illogical and unenforceable I don't know what is. IIRC that aspect of water law was rescinded a few years back but I don't care, this city poke fills his canteen from that new fangled thing called a spigot, all citified like.
I guess that readers can choose who to listen to--a guy who moved here from a water-rich riparian state just a few years ago, lives in a city and has little concept of Western agriculture; or a guy (me) who has spent most of his life and a lot of his working career dealing directly with water issues and water law in the arid West.
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Old 11-12-2014, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Colorado
2,483 posts, read 3,536,154 times
Reputation: 2674
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzlover View Post
I guess that readers can choose who to listen to--a guy who moved here from a water-rich riparian state just a few years ago, lives in a city and has little concept of Western agriculture; or a guy (me) who has spent most of his life and a lot of his working career dealing directly with water issues and water law in the arid West.
I choose both, because both sides have valid points and a right to use water responsibly.
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Old 11-12-2014, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,874,864 times
Reputation: 9324
mfbe wrote: If I wanted to be a serious gardener I'd head to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, a lush green area that will amaze you.

Yeah baby! I am thinking of moving there myself. My biggest concern is re-adjusting to a humid climate.



otterprods wrote: I choose both, because both sides have valid points and a right to use water responsibly.

It's not an either/or situation but rather a both/and situation as you say. BOTH jazz and Mike make valid points.
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