U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-13-2014, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
3,752 posts, read 3,859,615 times
Reputation: 3566

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by AD1985 View Post
Thanks, I'm surprised to see so many manufacturers in places like New York, Chicago, San Jose. Perhaps they're including industries that don't fit the stereotypical manufacturing definition that I'm thinking of.
Since this is CSA/MSA stats it includes New Jersey for New York, a big industrial state.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-13-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,534 posts, read 17,764,884 times
Reputation: 30881
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Since this is CSA/MSA stats it includes New Jersey for New York, a big industrial state.
And ths list seems to focus on manufacturing around the largest CSAs in the country whereas a lot of the smaller, more traditional, and diverse manufacturies are often located around smaller secondary urban areas.

Take for example Central New York State around Syracuse. There is a surprising amount of manufacturing in the area relative to the population as per the companies listed in this thread: Companies in CNY that are growing, offer unique products, or are relatively unknown

I still think manufacturing in the States is a shadow of its former self, but it is not dead yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 12:38 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
And ths list seems to focus on manufacturing around the largest CSAs in the country whereas a lot of the smaller, more traditional, and diverse manufacturies are often located around smaller secondary urban areas.
True, however even if the smaller urban areas have more per capita, the largest CSAs are still going to top the list.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 12:43 PM
 
2,564 posts, read 2,184,035 times
Reputation: 1816
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Not necessarily. Modernization alone will consistently reduce the amount of workers needed in manufacturing while at the same time increasing output capacity.

It's more accurate to say the days of having 10,000+ people working inside the same factory are long behind America. No longer can people just walk off the street into a factory. Now you need to actually have brains for the job.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ig6Q7VdBZmw
Very true, though I think there will always be lower value-added products that do in fact require labor intensive processes, and I think those jobs will never be coming back to America.

Also, I think manufacturing has as much to do with having a factoring/assembly line as much as a robust network of suppliers and support personnel. That is why multinationals like Apple consistently refuse to move their plants back to America from China, because China (and East Asia in general) already has a much more established infrastructure and supplier network in place that can cover the entire production life cycle, from the supply of individual components, to labor intensive/machine assembly, to shipping and access to global markets.

Technical advances and productivity are important, but a manufacturing plant needs much more than just efficient machines, and I'm afraid a lot of that supplier eco-system has already moved overseas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 12:49 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,264,768 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by AD1985 View Post
Thanks, I'm surprised to see so many manufacturers in places like New York, Chicago, San Jose. Perhaps they're including industries that don't fit the stereotypical manufacturing definition that I'm thinking of.
Correct. Fashion design/production, many food-related jobs, certain art/design jobs are labeled as manufacturing by the Census. If you're looking for "factory employment" the Census figures won't be very good.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 04:05 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
1,423 posts, read 1,281,938 times
Reputation: 1702
I used to work at Quad/Graphics which is the world's largest privately-owned printing company back in my Wisconsin days.
Printing used to be absolutely HUGE but it is tapering off as the internet has surged.

We would print eeeverything there... BusinessWeek, Time, People, Playboy, Sports Illustrated... even the official Super Bowl Programs every year.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-13-2014, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,058,698 times
Reputation: 3925
A big part of Minneapolis' manufacturing base comes from food processing. If you live in North America and have a box of Wheaties in your house it was made in northeast Minneapolis. That is one example but there are a ton of them. It is a good basic industry because it is pretty stable regardless of economic conditions and it is hard to outsource because transportation costs are more important than labor. There is also a lot of printing here for similar reasons (lots of trees up north), the printing tends to be for packaging rather than reading materials. Minneapolis is also big on manufacturing high tech medical devices. It is interesting that this city doesn't have a reputation for being an industrial city, but it has a larger manufacturing workforce (by percentage of the labor force) than a lot of cities that are thought of as industrial.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2014, 04:16 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,077 posts, read 5,455,470 times
Reputation: 4333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Metro Area(MSA) Manufacturing GDP, 2010
$20 Billion+

Los Angeles $74.4 Billion
Chicago $64.5 Billion
Houston $57.5 Billion
San Jose $44.9 Billion
San Francisco $40.9 Billion
Portland $32.6 Billion
Detroit $30.2 Billion
Seattle $28.0 Billion
Boston $27.8 Billion
Minneapolis $25.0 Billion
Indianapolis $23.2 Billion
Atlanta $22.1 Billion

Dallas and NY figures not available
Wait, I thought all of the manufacturing packed up and left Michigan? How can this be true?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top