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View Poll Results: Is Southern the same as country
Yes - the two are synonymous and all country people are Southern, too 14 17.95%
No - they can exist independently of each other in any region 64 82.05%
Voters: 78. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-30-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EddieOlSkool View Post
Great history lesson. However...

Why would it be more Caribbean or Latin American over time?

Also, it is known for tea. That Black tea brewed in sugar water is pretty much a Southern staple.
1800s Brazil and the Antebellum South had a lot more in common than many think. Brazil received 10K Confederate refugees after the war. The "slave holding south" was actually born in English plantations on Barbados before they moved to South Carolina colony via Charleston. For more info, it would be good to read up on the Knights of the Golden Circle.

Golden Circle (proposed country) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

What I meant by the tea thing is that that it would be known more for those things than Jim-Bob the and his sister/wife Betty Sue. The whole "Deliverance" factor would not be there. The mountains would probably still be heavily Native American country, and it is doubtful whether the country expands beyond the Gulf and East coast.
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Old 11-30-2014, 05:17 PM
 
Location: USA
7,778 posts, read 10,141,495 times
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WTF is this thread about?
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Old 12-05-2014, 10:26 AM
 
381 posts, read 413,073 times
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Default oops

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
Most "Country" State outside the Deep South (Texas-Louisiana-Mississippi-Alabama-Georgia-South Carolina)?

Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansaw, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina or West Virginia?
you forgot to add Virginia
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Old 08-12-2015, 04:46 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,424 posts, read 12,419,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VT'ah View Post
you forgot to add Virginia
I thought the influence of NoVa took the "country" out of most of Virginia.
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Old 08-12-2015, 07:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
I thought the influence of NoVa took the "country" out of most of Virginia.
Not really, in fact Virginia is the birthplace of Country music or at least that's what they claim (Bristol, VA/TN). Southern and Western Virginia definitely fit the "country" bill although you're right that this isn't the case around Northern Virginia, Richmond, and the Hampton Roads.

One could also argue that the influence of Raleigh/Durham takes the "country" out of most of North Carolina, or Atlanta for Georgia. I don't think this is the case, though.
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fwsavemoney View Post
I think it is because country music largely portrays south as all country with farmland, tractors and small communities. Like others have pointed out, farming/country life is very prevalent in the midwest too but there is nothing in the pop culture that portrays midwest that way.
Actually I have encountered multiple people from the East Coast who upon arriving in Ohio are surprised to learn that it contains cities. One (a grad of a well known univ),even asked me if the state contained in any cities larger than the small town that I was living in at the time! This person was surprised to learn that we had major league sports teams, of which we have several. These people have saidto me that they pictured Ohio is being composed entirely of cornfields, basically a carbon copy of the more sparsely populated areas of the Midwest. While we are a very important farming state, and that is a very important part of the state's culture, Ohio is 7th in the nation in population in spite of having a relatively small land area and over 80 percent of Ohio's population lives in metro areas. When I lived in an area near the West Virginia border I used to encounter people who would assume that people from that area literally didn't know what basic things like malls and nightclubs were. People, even educated people, in all parts of the country can harbor extremely distorted images of life in other parts of the country. I am often astonished at how many people don't even understand extremely basic aspects of life in other areas of the nation and oftentimes their own state and region

Last edited by robertbrianbush; 08-12-2015 at 08:18 AM..
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post


Obviously everything that is not urban is rural. Is that the brilliant point you're trying to make?

What state is not rural, going by this definition? No state is all urban, so, using your definition, every state is rural. Even Hong Kong is rural, using your weird definition.
Can' t we disagree on matters of opinion without being rude?
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:43 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,735,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robertbrianbush View Post
Actually I have encountered multiple people from the East Coast who upon arriving in Ohio are surprised to learn that it contains cities. One (a grad of a well known univ),even asked me if the state contained in any cities larger than the small town that I was living in at the time!
Either you are engaging in hyperbole or the people you are meeting are being sarcastic and their dry humor is going way over your head.

Even geographically challenged Americans have heard of Cleveland and Cincinnati.

And anyone with even a passing knowledge of sports in America (this must be upwards of a hundred, nay, a thousand people!) Have heard of the Bengals, Browns, Cavaliers, Reds, and Indians and their associated cities.
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:50 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
But only because NY State is populous, not because it's rural.

The largest rural populations are in the most populous states. California, New York, Texas and Florida have the largest rural populations. But they're all heavily urbanized states relative to most states in the South.

I just think you're looking at it really weird. It would be like saying California is the whitest state because it numerically has the most whites, rather than Vermont or wherever. Vermont is probably 98% white and California is probably 30% white but you would consider California more white just because of raw numbers?
I don't think there's anything weird about what this poster saying at . I think the two of you are just approaching the situation from different perspectives. I think this poster is saying that if you exclude the New York metro area, which is a relatively small area of the state geographically speaking although obviously outsized in importance in terms of its population, you're dealing with areas where a large percentage of the people live a rural lifestyle not terribly different from that of many in the south. I knowpeople from upstate New York who have very little connection to New York City and who actually laugh at the fact that people other parts of the country tended to assume that they lived an urban lifestyle upon hearing that they are from New York. They have only been to New York City three or four times!. If you had to designate the entire state as either being urban or rural, you would have to select urban because of New York City. But that would not come close to giving you a complete overall picture of life in the state. Millions of New Yorkers live in regions comprised of small town rural areas, many of whom rarely even visit the New York City metro area. Basically, it's just a reminder that a simple classification such as urban or rural when applied to an area as large and varied as a state, while useful for many purposes, glosses over the realities of life of a substantial number of people in that state. A simple point, to be sure, but one that people often forget. People who associate New Yorker is almost entirely with Manhattanites are often very surprised to learn that part of New York State is actually in Appalachia.

Last edited by robertbrianbush; 08-12-2015 at 08:59 AM..
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Old 08-12-2015, 08:31 PM
 
Location: MD's Eastern Shore
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I know this is an old thread that was revived today but I just had to read it to get my nightly dose of humor. Are there people who really think that a city can be country? What? It is the total opposite of country so there are urban areas in every state. Likewise every state has country. Southern is southern! It is not that hard to take in. If your from and live in Atlanta, Your not country! Yes, you are southern but not country. If your from somewhere from out in "sticksville" NY, PA or any other northern state you are as country as country can be. Definitely not southern but sure are country.

It is hilarious reading that people automatically think southern and country are one and the same. Then there are examples of how country music (based mainly in the south now) has helped make people think that because they sing songs about the south and being country. Well Duh! It's country music, not much of it is going to be about being in dance clubs with techno beats in the big city now is it?

As far as accents? It also seems that people think that anybody who has some kind of "twang" talks southern. There are many different accents so just because one doesn't sound like they are from NY/NJ or, like Kali, doesn't automatically make them southern. Now there I will mention the so called "country music accent" that seems popular in music today. IMO, it just sounds so exagerated and fake. Listen to the older singers still around and ones from back in the day and yes, they have an accent, but it is much more natural. It seems the young singers are told to exagerate there "twang" to sound more "country", southern or whatever and some of them just sound ridicules.
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