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Old 11-13-2014, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 676,624 times
Reputation: 1091

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
yeah something like urban area population is probably more meaningful

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


and scrolling down to the urban agglomerations is sort of interesting as well - or combined connected urban areas

NYC/Philly/CT 29 Mill
LA/Riverside 15 Mill
Chicago 8.9 Mill
Boston/PVD 6.7 Mill
Balt/Wash 6.6 Mill
SF/SJ 5.9 Mill
Miami/Ft Laud 5.4 Mill
DFW 5.0 Mill
Houston/Woodlands 4.6 Mill
Detroit 4.3 Mill
Atl 4.2 Mill
I'm not familiar with urban agglomerations. Maybe wikipedia is not either since they vary on what is including for individual cities. For instance, on the list below from wikipedia, NYC is 21.8 million and not including Philadelphia. But yet in the same list, Los Angeles and Chicago have higher populations. What exactly is the definition?

List of agglomerations by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 11-13-2014, 05:27 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,166,272 times
Reputation: 7739
Quote:
Originally Posted by EricNorthman View Post
I'm not familiar with urban agglomerations. Maybe wikipedia is not either since they vary on what is including for individual cities. For instance, on the list below from wikipedia, NYC is 21.8 million and not including Philadelphia. But yet in the same list, Los Angeles and Chicago have higher populations. What exactly is the definition?

List of agglomerations by population - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
What the wiki site is referencing i from the Census and a proposed UA due to connected space - they opted to formally list them separately but they meet the criteria as connected

https://www.federalregister.gov/arti...10-census#p-52

Splitting Large Urban Agglomerations

Similar to the delineation process used for the 2000 Census, the Census Bureau will use the same automated urban area delineation methodology for determining urban and rural areas in the 2010 Census. Use of this approach will result in some exceptionally large urban agglomerations of continuously developed territory. Although such areas do reflect the reality of urbanization at one scale, the areas may be cumbersome and less satisfactory for more localized applications. For example, an area of virtually continuous urbanization exists from northeastern Maryland through the Philadelphia area, central New Jersey, the New York City area, and central Connecticut to beyond Springfield, MA. This area of near-continuous urbanization encompasses nine UAs defined for Census 2000. Another area of continuous urbanization exists in the San Francisco Bay area, including the San Francisco-Oakland, San Jose, and several smaller areas.
The Census Bureau anticipates that many data users would find these large agglomerations to be inconvenient for meaningful analysis, and therefore, proposes that they be split in some consistent fashion. For example, the Census Bureau split large agglomerations for Census 2000 by using metropolitan statistical area and primary metropolitan statistical area (PMSA) boundaries as a guide to identify the narrowest area along the high density “corridor” between larger core areas. For instance, the corridor of high residential population density between Baltimore, MD, and Washington, DC, was narrowest in northern Prince George's County, MD, in the area of Beltsville, MD, and near the boundary between the Washington PMSA and the Baltimore PMSA.
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Old 11-13-2014, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,767,031 times
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How is this still relevant? What do city populations mean?
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Old 11-13-2014, 10:18 PM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,494,500 times
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What's the next city over 1million people? I don't know, which southern/western city can annex enough land/merge with it's county to inflate it's population fastest?
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Old 11-13-2014, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Mid-Michigan by way of Northern New Hampshire
239 posts, read 277,935 times
Reputation: 322
My prediction:

The New Hampshire legislature goes crazy and creates the "City-State of New Hampshire." This new body has a population of 1.3 million.
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Old 11-14-2014, 02:20 AM
 
Location: Austin
1,795 posts, read 2,568,107 times
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MSA is a more logical term of measuring population than city population. IMO
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Old 11-14-2014, 02:46 AM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,512 posts, read 2,974,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoninATX View Post
MSA is a more logical term of measuring population than city population. IMO
Yes, MSA isn't bound by arbitrary city limits that might be too small (Boston, Miami, SF) or too large (Jacksonville, Houston, OKC). A much better metric for comparing populations than city limits.
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Old 11-14-2014, 05:20 AM
 
21,195 posts, read 30,379,606 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoninATX View Post
MSA is a more logical term of measuring population than city population. IMO
Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Yes, MSA isn't bound by arbitrary city limits that might be too small (Boston, Miami, SF) or too large (Jacksonville, Houston, OKC). A much better metric for comparing populations than city limits.
Incorrect in my opinion. How is it logical that cities that are clearly smaller than others in terms of urban infrastructure (versus thousands of square miles of hodgepodge sprawl) can be considered large metropolitan areas? It would seem to defy the most widely used definition of the term "metropolitan". Furthermore the term MSA is arbitrary and not consistent, as already pointed out with the Raleigh and Durham situation alone where two cities that actually adjoin are separated into two separate MSAs, and where people live in one and work in the other? How in the world does that make sense to anyone?? It would seem the gerrymandered "system" has gone off the rails and and is no longer much of a measure.
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Old 11-14-2014, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Austin
596 posts, read 676,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Yes, MSA isn't bound by arbitrary city limits that might be too small (Boston, Miami, SF) or too large (Jacksonville, Houston, OKC). A much better metric for comparing populations than city limits.
MSA is better than city but I think urban areas are a better way to compare cities than any other measure.

List of United States urban areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 11-14-2014, 06:13 AM
 
3,961 posts, read 3,494,500 times
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Urban area is the best, MSA is just based on county commuting patterns and there are a bunch of examples of flaws in the system. Grand Rapids MSA is 3 separate urban areas in one MSA. Ironically parts of two of those urban areas have large swaths of populations in completely different MSAs. Considering that, it's CSA would be a better representation of those populations. But when you're in Grand Rapids it feels more like you're in a city the size of it's urban area at 600k. Ottawa County Michigan is a statisticians nightmare, as it's population is clustered in 3 separate poles of a triangle bringing 3 urban areas together. Most people just use whatever metric best serves their point however
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