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Old 11-15-2014, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,523 posts, read 7,475,821 times
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This thread is almost laughable. The south will not disappear as a cultural region. Do northerners bring new things into the south??? Well yes all migrations of people spread culture and ideas. That means some northern ways will end up in the south. What also happens is the new comers usually assume most of the culture of the place they have moved to. If they don't out of stubbornness their children certainly will. Many northern transplants in the south become quite southern in short order. This is how all migrations of people happen, nothing new. Southern culture is quite safe.
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Old 11-15-2014, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,272 posts, read 26,273,936 times
Reputation: 11734
Quote:
Originally Posted by AES328 View Post
This.

My god, the stereotypes.
What are the stereotypes?

Southern accents. That's true.

Religiosity. It is true that the South is the most religious region of the country. He didn't say that nobody outside of the South is religious. But if people keep migrating from relatively non-religious places, it stands to reason that that place will become less religious.

Liberalism. Same thing.
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Old 11-15-2014, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Cedar Rapids
233 posts, read 281,729 times
Reputation: 224
He's always making posts he knows will make a big offensive splash. Frankly, whenever I visit the South, I see most young people embracing Southern culture. It's not going anywhere - posts like this just make the South stronger. There really hasn't been the big homogenization of culture that everyone think's has taken place. I'm sorry, it's just not there!
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Old 11-15-2014, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,923,550 times
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The South is not losing its culture and way of life that is utterly ignorant and plain stupid. Atlanta, the Research Triangle and Orlando and Tampa if you even consider that the South have large amounts of Northeast Transplants I agree but the mix well with the locals. The United States in general is getting more socially liberal and progressive but the rural areas have still retain their southern charm, believe I have traveled all over the South in rural areas and cities.
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Old 11-15-2014, 03:50 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,275,308 times
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I don't see a ton of similarities between SC and VA. One is about as Upper South as you can get, while the other is quite Deep South. VA is much more similar to NC, and they're both swing states these days. The major metros of both states tend to vote liberal, while the majority of the rural areas go conservative. For Virginia, not just counting Northern Virginia. I'm pretty sure the Richmond metro is quite liberal, as well.
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:36 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,814,386 times
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People in Richmond over hype it, saying it's not southern yet you still see rebel flags and there's still a southern dialect when they talk. You have plenty of waffle houses and sonics. There's only one waffle house in northern Virginia, even in Hampton Roads it's beach culture. Not a strong southern culture that Richmond is still tied to

Last edited by JMT; 11-18-2014 at 08:25 AM..
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:38 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,275,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
No, Richmond is still very conservative. Northern Virginia and Hampton Roads are the areas that make Virginia blue. People in Richmond over hype it, saying it's not southern yet you still see rebel flags and there's still a southern dialect when they talk. You have plenty of waffle houses and sonics. There's only one waffle house in northern Virginia, even in Hampton Roads it's beach culture. Not a strong southern culture that Richmond is still tied to
Ah, okay. Sounds a little like the Triad area of NC (Greensboro, Winston-Salem) while NOVA and the Hampton Roads would be more like the Triangle (Raleigh/Durham) and Charlotte.
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Old 11-15-2014, 04:43 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,814,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Ah, okay. Sounds a little like the Triad area of NC (Greensboro, Winston-Salem) while NOVA and the Hampton Roads would be more like the Triangle (Raleigh/Durham) and Charlotte.
Never been to either of those places? Explain the similarities and some background of the two areas if you don't mind
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Old 11-15-2014, 05:08 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,275,308 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Never been to either of those places? Explain the similarities and some background of the two areas if you don't mind
You haven't been? No prob!

The Triad is comprised of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point, NC. This area is probably the most conservative of the three major metros in NC. Not as diverse, less transplants. Textiles, furniture manufacturing, and tobacco used to drive this metro but that's not really the case anymore. Still, a nice area and more slower paced than Charlotte and the Triangle. Least populated metro of the three.

The Triangle is comprised of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, NC. This metro is growing VERY fast. You have NC State University in Raleigh, Duke University in Durham, and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. These three universities are the driving force behind this metro, thanks to the incorporation of Research Triangle Park. RTP has brought many outside transplants to the Triangle, many from the northeast. In this case, the Triangle is quite liberal for the most part. I've heard some call it a "mini-Northern Virginia." Durham is also an old tobacco town like Winston-Salem over in the Triad.

Charlotte is the biggest city in the state. Used to rely heavily on textile mills, but now it's the second largest banking center in the nation. Like the Triangle, Charlotte is growing at a tremendous rate and attracting many transplants from around the nation and world as a whole. Very much a "New South" city, I call it a "wannabe Atlanta" haha! Most populated metro of the three, but the Triangle isn't too far behind.

So basically, the Triad area is the least diverse/liberal of the three. From the Virginia description, I guess it sounds like Richmond is more akin to the Triad.
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Old 11-15-2014, 06:25 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,814,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
You haven't been? No prob!

The Triad is comprised of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point, NC. This area is probably the most conservative of the three major metros in NC. Not as diverse, less transplants. Textiles, furniture manufacturing, and tobacco used to drive this metro but that's not really the case anymore. Still, a nice area and more slower paced than Charlotte and the Triangle. Least populated metro of the three.

The Triangle is comprised of Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill, NC. This metro is growing VERY fast. You have NC State University in Raleigh, Duke University in Durham, and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. These three universities are the driving force behind this metro, thanks to the incorporation of Research Triangle Park. RTP has brought many outside transplants to the Triangle, many from the northeast. In this case, the Triangle is quite liberal for the most part. I've heard some call it a "mini-Northern Virginia." Durham is also an old tobacco town like Winston-Salem over in the Triad.

Charlotte is the biggest city in the state. Used to rely heavily on textile mills, but now it's the second largest banking center in the nation. Like the Triangle, Charlotte is growing at a tremendous rate and attracting many transplants from around the nation and world as a whole. Very much a "New South" city, I call it a "wannabe Atlanta" haha! Most populated metro of the three, but the Triangle isn't too far behind.

So basically, the Triad area is the least diverse/liberal of the three. From the Virginia description, I guess it sounds like Richmond is more akin to the Triad.
Richmond sounds like a mix of the triad and triangle lol.
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