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Old 11-24-2014, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Muncie, IN
588 posts, read 1,091,063 times
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San Jose
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Old 11-24-2014, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
9,832 posts, read 7,678,667 times
Reputation: 6288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Virginia Beach may qualify as #3 behind Long Beach and Mesa, despite being larger than Norfolk which is still the main economic hub of Hampton Roads.
Long Beach has twice the population and twice the density of "primary city" Norfolk. You seriously can't think of better candidates for the #2 spot?
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Old 11-24-2014, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Texarkana, Tx
287 posts, read 433,202 times
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Mesa, AZ followed by Arlington, TX, Aurora, CO and Hialeah, FL.
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Old 11-25-2014, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
5,205 posts, read 7,890,512 times
Reputation: 2719
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondChandlerLives View Post
Long Beach has twice the population and twice the density of "primary city" Norfolk. You seriously can't think of better candidates for the #2 spot?
Yes, but it probably wouldn't have been able to thrive without Los Angeles. I personally believe that Long Beach is the largest suburb in America due to it being dependent on the Los Angeles economy.
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Old 11-25-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,421 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Yes, but it probably wouldn't have been able to thrive without Los Angeles. I personally believe that Long Beach is the largest suburb in America due to it being dependent on the Los Angeles economy.
I was initially agreeing with the idea that Long Beach was suburban, but looking at the core on Google Street View, it really isn't. I expected to see a small downtown which went right to ranches, but there's tons of apartments and small multi-unit structures in the neighborhoods around downtown. It looks pretty dense by West Coast standards. Seems like more of a real city, for example, than San Jose.
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Old 11-25-2014, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Queen Creek, AZ
5,205 posts, read 7,890,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I was initially agreeing with the idea that Long Beach was suburban, but looking at the core on Google Street View, it really isn't. I expected to see a small downtown which went right to ranches, but there's tons of apartments and small multi-unit structures in the neighborhoods around downtown. It looks pretty dense by West Coast standards. Seems like more of a real city, for example, than San Jose.
Downtown Mesa isn't adjacent to any ranches either. In fact, the nearest ranches to Downtown Mesa are either located in Gilbert or in far eastern Mesa. Mesa has very few rural portions; much of the rural portions of the East Valley of the Phoenix metro area are located in Chandler, Gilbert, or Queen Creek.
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Old 11-25-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,421 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Downtown Mesa isn't adjacent to any ranches either. In fact, the nearest ranches to Downtown Mesa are either located in Gilbert or in far eastern Mesa. Mesa has very few rural portions; much of the rural portions of the East Valley of the Phoenix metro area are located in Chandler, Gilbert, or Queen Creek.
I meant ranch housing. In a lot of sun-belt cities, virtually all of the pre-WW2 housing was wiped out through expansion of the downtown, so you go straight from the CBD to 1950s suburbia, with no "classic urban" neighborhoods (e.g., rowhouses, apartments, single-family houses with only a few feet between them, etc).

Mesa looks pretty damn suburban though - I found this two blocks off the main drag. Clearly Craftsman-era, but built in a suburban style with a wide setback from the street and other properties.
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Old 11-25-2014, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,752,033 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pink Jazz View Post
Downtown Mesa isn't adjacent to any ranches either. In fact, the nearest ranches to Downtown Mesa are either located in Gilbert or in far eastern Mesa. Mesa has very few rural portions; much of the rural portions of the East Valley of the Phoenix metro area are located in Chandler, Gilbert, or Queen Creek.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I meant ranch housing. In a lot of sun-belt cities, virtually all of the pre-WW2 housing was wiped out through expansion of the downtown, so you go straight from the CBD to 1950s suburbia, with no "classic urban" neighborhoods (e.g., rowhouses, apartments, single-family houses with only a few feet between them, etc).

Mesa looks pretty damn suburban though - I found this two blocks off the main drag. Clearly Craftsman-era, but built in a suburban style with a wide setback from the street and other properties.
Long Beach and Mesa really aren't comparable at all. As eschaton already explained, downtown Long Beach is a built-up urban area, with it's own skyline, it's own urban core (urban by West Coast standards) made of of small pre-WW2 apartment buildings, some row housing, and multi-unit housing built in dense patterns. Mesa has nothing like this. In downtown Mesa you have a small strip of shops and low level office buildings that blend right into single-family ranch style tract houses. There is no dense core whatsoever in Mesa. Most of Mesa's population has only been there since the early 80's. Long Beach reached city status population levels in the 1920's, when there was still plenty of open, undeveloped land between it and Los Angeles.

In other words, Long Beach was already "thriving" as a city well before L.A.'s suburban sprawl reached it. Can't say the same for Mesa in relation to Phoenix.
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Old 11-25-2014, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,263,797 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Toronto actually has two suburbs that are larger than Laval (400,000). Mississauga has over 700,000 people and Brampton has over 500,000. Also the Vancouver suburb of Surrey has 70,000 more people than Laval.
Can we really call Mississauga a "suburb" though? It has the sixth largest population in Canada and sure looks much more like a city than Quebec City or Ottawa:

Mississauga: 700,000 people - 6,300 people/square mile
Quebec City: 500,000 people - 2,700/square mile
Ottawa: 1 million people - 4,800/square mile
Calgary: 1 million people - 4,000/square mile

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Old 11-25-2014, 04:37 PM
 
1,704 posts, read 1,366,118 times
Reputation: 1753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poquoson7 View Post
VA Beach, at around 440,000, is the largest city in Virginia and began as a suburb of Norfolk. In many cases it is still that suburb despite developing it's own "city" status.
um...
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