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Old 02-15-2015, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
World Class has more to do than which is more internationally known.

Economy, public transit, density, rtf all play into it.
Why? And if it does, it shouldn't. We're talking about Global cities. Cities that are cosmopolitan. Which means they are plugged into the rest of the world.

If a city has great public transportation but is unknown to everyone else but locals, who cares? it's not global, it's not world class.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
And yet Chicago beats Miami on pretty much every global cities list that gets published, but hey, believe what you want.
Global city - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Chicago is clearly a much bigger and more important city than Miami.

But Miami is clearly a more international city, and probably has more of a global iconic status.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:43 AM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Miami is clearly, without question, more international than Chicago. It might be the most international city in the U.S. (yes, even moreso than NYC). Chicago feels totally all-American, and does not have an exotic foreign feel, at all. It feels like hot dogs, apple pie, and all that jazz.
I don't know how one could walk through Little Village, Chinatown, Albany Park, etc and think hot dogs and apple pie. These areas may not be the big tourist spots but they are part of Chicago nonetheless. It's no Miami, but to say it doesn't have an exotic foreign feel, at all, misses the mark. Even much smaller Midwestern cities have neighborhoods that have a foreign feel.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:46 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Ok, somehow Chicago is more global but Miami is better known and more traveled by foreigners. There is a number criteria on that list such as "Major manufacturing centres" that might be skewing Chicago higher than it deserves.

Who would call Chicago a more global city than Los Angeles, DC, and even San Francisco? Not me. Not most people either.
Chicago's manufacturing is a shadow of its former self, hence why Chicago moved rapidly to diversify its economy in the past, and why its currently one of the most diverse in the United States.

What Chicago does have is the world's largest derivatives market. It also scores well in regards to other characteristics on the list mentioned at the beginning of the article, but keep in mind that each listing gives different weight for different categories.

Also lists have put Chicago higher than those cities in the past. Los Angeles and Chicago are usually pretty close to one another.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
Why? And if it does, it shouldn't. We're talking about Global cities. Cities that are cosmopolitan. Which means they are plugged into the rest of the world.

If a city has great public transportation but is unknown to everyone else but locals, who cares? it's not global, it's not world class.
Each list is different. Some look more heavily at more characteristics than others, but you're not going to find a global cities list that looks exclusively at public transit. It might play a role in some, but the role is minor in comparison to the city's connection to the global economy and the influence it wields in that arena.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:48 AM
 
Location: St. Louis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Chicago is clearly a much bigger and more important city than Miami.

But Miami is clearly a more international city, and probably has more of a global iconic status.
That's not what I was talking about, however, nor was that what the OP was talking about. The OP was asking about the most powerful and influential cities, not which ones were more iconic or bigger tourist destinations.

In terms of global power, Chicago trumps Miami.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I don't know how one could walk through Little Village, Chinatown, Albany Park, etc and think hot dogs and apple pie. These areas may not be the big tourist spots but they are part of Chicago nonetheless. It's no Miami, but to say it doesn't have an exotic foreign feel, at all, misses the mark. Even much smaller Midwestern cities have neighborhoods that have a foreign feel.
I agree. It's rather hard for a city proper that's about 1/4 foreign born to not feel international at all.
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Old 02-15-2015, 10:51 AM
 
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Philadelphia, if not already.
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Old 02-15-2015, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I don't know how one could walk through Little Village, Chinatown, Albany Park, etc and think hot dogs and apple pie. These areas may not be the big tourist spots but they are part of Chicago nonetheless. It's no Miami, but to say it doesn't have an exotic foreign feel, at all, misses the mark. Even much smaller Midwestern cities have neighborhoods that have a foreign feel.
A lot of American cities have ethnic enclaves where you can get food, groceries, goods from a particular ethnic group. Chicago being the third largest American city, has many of them.

Miami is in another ballpark altogether. You can say that simply that traditional "American" culture has become so rare in Miami you have to look for it, like foreigners have to look for their ethnic enclave in Chicago. You don't know how many people visit Miami tell me they don't really think of Miami as an American city. I don't think that happens for any other large American city, but maybe I'm wrong.
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Old 02-15-2015, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL/Tokyo, Japan
1,699 posts, read 1,599,015 times
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I'm also not sure GDP is a good measure in the case of Miami which benefits so much from tourism. After all GDP = Gross Domestic Gross Product and is more useful to determine what a city produces. Miami simply takes your tourist dollars.

In terms of wealth, Miami is probably one of the worst places in the USA for differences between rich and poor. We have a lot of poor people here. But certainly a lot of rich as well. The wealth on display here is ludicrous and I've seen people blow an annual average Chicago salary just in a club.
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Old 02-15-2015, 11:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
I don't know how one could walk through Little Village, Chinatown, Albany Park, etc and think hot dogs and apple pie. These areas may not be the big tourist spots but they are part of Chicago nonetheless.
I don't really get your point. Every city has ethnic neighborhoods, in fact that is very all-American to have such enclaves. What city in the U.S. doesn't have Mexican neigborhoods, or Chinese people? A city with Mexican areas is about as all-American as it gets.

And the proportion foreign-born in Chicago is generally lower than the other major U.S. cities. It's much lower than that of NYC, SF, LA, DC, Houston, Dallas, Miami.

In contrast, Miami is basically one giant non-American enclave, and its ethnic mix doesn't resemble the rest of the U.S., at all.
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Old 02-15-2015, 11:44 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,256,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SDPMiami View Post
I'm also not sure GDP is a good measure in the case of Miami which benefits so much from tourism.
That makes no sense whatsoever. Why would certain parts of GDP, and specifically tourism, be excluded?
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