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Old 11-22-2014, 08:53 AM
 
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How about Atlanta?
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Old 11-22-2014, 08:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kovaks View Post
Chicago isn't that liberal is it?
How does one differentiate between a liberal city or conservative city?
What are the pros/cons of living in either?
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Old 11-22-2014, 09:03 AM
 
12 posts, read 8,474 times
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Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
How does one differentiate between a liberal city or conservative city?
What are the pros/cons of living in either?
Conservative city votes Republican; liberal city votes Democrat basically.

Pros of being in a conservative city for me? Being among likeminded people. It does make a difference. I'm from Little Rock originally (conservative city) and moving to L.A. has been a *huge* culture shock.
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Old 11-22-2014, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Lancaster, PA would be perfect. The people are conservative (the most conservative city in PA), modest, introverted and "family-focused." They are so introverted, in fact, that my friends who live there had trouble making new friends at first. The city has a great crafts scene (quilts, landscape paintings, candles, antiques, restored old cars), if that's an interest. And while having four seasons, it's neither as hot as the swampy cities to its east nor as cold as Central New York or Western PA. No clubs, but some great bars. Northernmost Waffle House in the US.

The most conservative of big cities are politically moderate (Indy, Cincy, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston), so most of the cities on my list are smaller. The great thing about Lancaster is that you could enjoy living in a conservative city, yet you could hop on Amtrak and be in Philly, enjoying everything big cities have to offer, in just an hour and a half. You're also an hour from Baltimore and less than two hours from DC. Lancaster's MSA population is 508,000. Unemployment 7.4%.

My sense is that Manchester, New Hampshire could work also, but I haven't spent enough time there to know for sure. Perhaps other people else could speak about Manchester better than me. But from what little time I did spend there, New Hampshire seems to be the land of libertarian-minded introverts. Manchester's population is 404,000. Unemployment 4.5%.

If you can deal with the snow, you may like Syracuse, New York. The people are aloof, yet truly kind-hearted. While not as conservative as Lancaster (the politics in Syracuse are center-left in the city proper and center-right in the metro area), it's the most conservative city in New York. As a liberal, myself, I thought it was frustratingly conservative. Though the city suffers from some pretty bad urban decay, it has some of the most charming suburbs I've ever seen. Plus, the cost of living is remarkably low. Like most rustbelt cities, it hits well for its size in terms of cultural amenities. The city hosts some really great dive bars, and the surrounding area offers so much to do from wine tasting to sailing to x-country skiing to apple picking. The Syracuse area's population is 668,000. Unemployment 7.5%.

Charleston, West Virginia, while dealing with it's own set of problems (meth and Rx drug abuse are on the rise), is a beautiful city nestled in mountains of Appalachia with a beautiful river running through it. The weather, while definitely having four seasons, is moderate. I also found West Virginians, while still friendly and hospitable, to be more introverted and less outgoing than other Southerners. On the downside, Charleston is small; the metro area's population is just 225,000. Unemployment 5.8%.

In terms of right-of-center big cities, I think Indianapolis offers the most. Great restaurants, bars, and cultural amenities. The people are rather outgoing though. Unemployment 5.8%.

I think Grand Rapids is a descent suggest, but overall I found that the folks in the Interior Northeast and New England to be more introverted than Midwesterners (or Southerners for that matter). Like, suburban Milwaukee is almost exactly what you're looking for, save for the fact that Wisconsinites are the epitome of extraverted and outgoing.

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 11-22-2014 at 10:12 AM..
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Old 11-22-2014, 10:08 AM
 
56,540 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Lancaster, PA would be perfect. The people are conservative (the most conservative city in PA), modest, introverted and "family-focused." They are so introverted, in fact, that my friends who live there had trouble making new friends at first. The city has a great crafts scene (quilts, landscape paintings, candles, antiques, restored old cars), if that's an interest. And while having four seasons, it's neither as hot as the swampy cities to its east nor as cold as Central New York or Western PA. No clubs, but some great bars. Northernmost Waffle House in the US.

The most conservative of big cities are politically moderate (Indy, Cincy, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston), so most of the cities on my list are smaller. The great thing about Lancaster is that you could enjoy living in a conservative city, yet you could hop on Amtrak and be in Philly, enjoying everything big cities have to offer, in just an hour and a half. You're also an hour from Baltimore and less than two hours from DC. Lancaster's MSA population is 508,000.

My sense is that Manchester, New Hampshire could work also, but I haven't spent enough time there to know for sure. Perhaps other people else could speak about Manchester better than me. But from what little time I did spend there, New Hampshire seems to be the land of libertarian-minded introverts. Manchester's population is 404,000.

If you can deal with the snow, you may like Syracuse, New York. While not as conservative as Lancaster, the politics in Syracuse are center-left in the city proper and center-right in the metro area, it's the most conservative city in New York. Though the city suffers from some pretty bad urban decay, it has some of the most charming suburbs I've ever seen. Plus, the cost of living is remarkably low. The city hosts some really great dive bars, and the surrounding area offers so much to do from wine tasting to sailing to x-country skiing to apple picking. The Syracuse area's population is 668,000.

Charleston, West Virginia, while dealing with some urban decay issues, is a beautiful city nestled in mountains of Appalachia with a beautiful river running through it. The weather, while definitely having four seasons, is moderate. I also found West Virginians, while still friendly and hospitable, to be more introverted and less outgoing than other Southerners. On the downside, Charleston is small; the metro area's population is just 225,000.

In terms of right-of-center big cities, I think Indianapolis offers the most. Great restaurants, bars, and cultural amenities. The people are rather outgoing though.

I think Grand Rapids is a descent suggest, but overall I found that the folks in the Interior Northeast and New England to be more introverted than Midwesterners (or Southerners for that matter). Like, suburban Milwaukee is almost exactly what you're looking for, save for the fact that Wisconsinites are the epitome of extraverted and outgoing.
I wouldn't call Syracuse the most conservative city in NY State considering the strong college town aspect on the East Side and it has its share of solid/nice city neighborhoods as well. It also has the census tract in Upstate NY with the second highest percentage of same sex households. Some of the suburbs/small towns in the area would be better/good fits.

You really don't have a truly conservative city in NY State, but areas like Utica-Rome and Binghamton would be better fits in that regard. Perhaps the Watertown area with the strong military presence. With this said, even these areas are more in terms of leanings versus being staunch.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 11-22-2014 at 10:23 AM..
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Old 11-22-2014, 10:19 AM
 
12 posts, read 8,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Lancaster, PA would be perfect. The people are conservative (the most conservative city in PA), modest, introverted and "family-focused." They are so introverted, in fact, that my friends who live there had trouble making new friends at first. The city has a great crafts scene (quilts, landscape paintings, candles, antiques, restored old cars), if that's an interest. And while having four seasons, it's neither as hot as the swampy cities to its east nor as cold as Central New York or Western PA. No clubs, but some great bars. Northernmost Waffle House in the US.

The most conservative of big cities are politically moderate (Indy, Cincy, Phoenix, Dallas, Houston), so most of the cities on my list are smaller. The great thing about Lancaster is that you could enjoy living in a conservative city, yet you could hop on Amtrak and be in Philly, enjoying everything big cities have to offer, in just an hour and a half. You're also an hour from Baltimore and less than two hours from DC. Lancaster's MSA population is 508,000. Unemployment 7.4%.

My sense is that Manchester, New Hampshire could work also, but I haven't spent enough time there to know for sure. Perhaps other people else could speak about Manchester better than me. But from what little time I did spend there, New Hampshire seems to be the land of libertarian-minded introverts. Manchester's population is 404,000. Unemployment 4.5%.

If you can deal with the snow, you may like Syracuse, New York. The people are aloof, yet truly kind-hearted. While not as conservative as Lancaster (the politics in Syracuse are center-left in the city proper and center-right in the metro area), it's the most conservative city in New York. As a liberal, myself, I thought it was frustratingly conservative. Though the city suffers from some pretty bad urban decay, it has some of the most charming suburbs I've ever seen. Plus, the cost of living is remarkably low. Like most rustbelt cities, it hits well for its size in terms of cultural amenities. The city hosts some really great dive bars, and the surrounding area offers so much to do from wine tasting to sailing to x-country skiing to apple picking. The Syracuse area's population is 668,000. Unemployment 7.5%.

Charleston, West Virginia, while dealing with it's own set of problems (meth and Rx drug abuse are on the rise), is a beautiful city nestled in mountains of Appalachia with a beautiful river running through it. The weather, while definitely having four seasons, is moderate. I also found West Virginians, while still friendly and hospitable, to be more introverted and less outgoing than other Southerners. On the downside, Charleston is small; the metro area's population is just 225,000. Unemployment 5.8%.

In terms of right-of-center big cities, I think Indianapolis offers the most. Great restaurants, bars, and cultural amenities. The people are rather outgoing though. Unemployment 5.8%.

I think Grand Rapids is a descent suggest, but overall I found that the folks in the Interior Northeast and New England to be more introverted than Midwesterners (or Southerners for that matter). Like, suburban Milwaukee is almost exactly what you're looking for, save for the fact that Wisconsinites are the epitome of extraverted and outgoing.
You seem incredibly knowledgable on this, mind if I pm you some questions?
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Old 11-22-2014, 04:40 PM
 
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thanks for the answers, keep 'em coming!
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Old 11-22-2014, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati, OH
1,715 posts, read 2,719,088 times
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Originally Posted by kovaks View Post
Hello,

I am currently employed in Los Angeles, California and absolutely hate it here. I NEED to move A.S.A.P. but I have no idea where to go, so I was help you folks could give me some suggestions... The main thing I dislike about L.A. is the entire lifestyle. I am an introverted conservative type living amongst extraverted liberal types and it's not working out. I want to move somewhere that has four seasons, not continuously temperate like L.A. I want to go somewhere that has more conservative politics (not necesarilly Southern cities) but moderate will do. I don't like to have a large group of friends and in L.A. people look down on you for not partaking in the hedonistic clubbing scene. I want to go somewhere where social life is dominated by bars not clubs and where the people want to talk about current affairs or sports rather than their social media footprint or that summer in their junior year that they went to Guatemala and helped build a hospital and how this makes them a better person. To sum it up, I want to move somewhere with:

...four seasons (but not hot and humid all year round).
...conservative/moderate politics.
...introverted people.
...a bar scene NOT a clubbing scene.
...not a ridiculously high cost of living.
...low to medium crime rate (nowhere that consistently makes the top 100 crime cities).

Any other criteria you suggest I add?

Please advise me on where to move!

- Mike K
Cincinnati, Ohio is worth checking out.

We definitely have four seasons. July and August can be fairly humid, but it's not that bad.

The city these days is pretty moderate. The suburbs are very conservative, though.

Yes, introverted. Very friendly in a southern sort of way.

You'll love the cost of living, it's one of the cheapest in the country.

Crime rate is average, but it's only in certain pockets of the city. Basically outside of the downtown area.

Sports are HUGE here. Even high school football. Wherever you are I guarantee there will be someone nearby who is willing to talk one of the local teams.

The bar scene is very big as well. Cincinnati used to be one of the major brewing towns in the country. There are bars all over in the Over the Rhine area. You should really check that out.

Perhaps one of the best things about Cincinnati is that it used to be a very big city (about 550,000 in 1960). So there are plenty of big city amenities without everything being crowded. The downtown area is also very compact, which is a big plus IMO. The city is also in the middle of a very big turnaround that started in 2007 or so there will be a lot of opportunities for success. For example GE is building a new global operations center here, and I believe there are only four other locations in the world.

Let me know if you have any other questions or would like me to expand on my comments above.
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Old 11-23-2014, 08:25 AM
 
Location: East Bay
697 posts, read 1,155,388 times
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Originally Posted by kovaks View Post
Conservative city votes Republican; liberal city votes Democrat basically.

Pros of being in a conservative city for me? Being among likeminded people. It does make a difference. I'm from Little Rock originally (conservative city) and moving to L.A. has been a *huge* culture shock.
Totally agree, but from the other side of the fence. One of the disheartening things about living in Phoenix is that all your neighbors assume you hate Obama just like they do.
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Old 11-23-2014, 09:46 AM
 
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^ But from my PoV a good thing.....
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