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Old 11-26-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Pennsylvania does not have a seacoast.
True, but if you live in the Philadelphia area, you're close enough to the coast to go to the Jersey Shore or Delaware if need be for a beach fix.
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Old 11-26-2014, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,316 posts, read 6,970,829 times
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First of all, I'd like to speak up for Dallas' transit system, which is actually quite decent, and excellent for the south. It should be considered. Other cheaper southern cities with good transit are Atlanta and Charlotte, both a long drive from the ocean but still in-state. All three cities can actually allow for a carless lifestyle if you live in the right places, but there is quite a tradeoff versus the transit access of NYC, SF, etc.

For real big cities with great transit, Chicago and Philly should be at the top of your list. Chicago is on Lake Michigan and Philly is a pretty short drive to the ocean...both with lower COL than comparable cities.
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Old 11-26-2014, 08:30 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
Reputation: 7738
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
True, but if you live in the Philadelphia area, you're close enough to the coast to go to the Jersey Shore or Delaware if need be for a beach fix.
though Philly is closer to a beach than say a Baltimore or Atlanta who's states do

I can leave center city and be on a beach in 60 minutes or less

edit: meant to quote Katiana
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Old 11-26-2014, 08:40 AM
 
Location: San Antonio
5,286 posts, read 4,160,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Do you ever leave Texas?
What problem do you have with his statement? If you're saying he's wrong then atleast explain why.
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,108,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoolNerd View Post
I read Houston is one of the most car dependent if not the most car dependent city in the US!
If that was the case there wouldn't be an annual ridership of 80.5+ million people on the bus & rail system with almost 10,000 stops throughout the city.
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,926,143 times
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Houston isn't even in the top 50 highest U.S. cities for transit ridership.

Anyway, virtually any U.S. city will have a bus system used by the poor and other people who do not have cars. The difference between good transit and bad transit cities is in the good ones people will willingly use the transit system for work even if they own a car. Largely because it's more of a pain in the butt to find/pay for parking in Downtown (or other key employment centers) than it is to just take the bus or train in.
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Upper East Side of Texas
12,521 posts, read 23,108,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Do you ever leave Texas?
Its up there with NYC, LA, & Chicago.

Philly, Phoenix, Seattle, & DC have Houston beat, but its whatever...Metro is still in the Top 13 & continues to grow each year.

Houston has a freeway system that puts all those cities to shame. More HOV lanes per mile & per capita than any of those cities combined.

http://www.metro-magazine.com/resour...oct_top100.pdf
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:52 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,812,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Its up there with NYC, LA, & Chicago.

Philly, Phoenix, Seattle, & DC have Houston beat, but its whatever...Metro is still in the Top 13 & continues to grow each year.

Houston has a freeway system that puts all those cities to shame. More HOV lanes per mile & per capita than any of those cities combined.

http://www.metro-magazine.com/resour...oct_top100.pdf
DC metro has the second best heavy rail system behind NYC in the country if not Chicago..... LA transportation is not good unless you're talking about buses. So take LA off that list and its NYC, DC and Chicago.

Houston is behind in public transportation, east coast cities dominate this category.
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Old 11-26-2014, 09:58 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,161,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mega man View Post
What problem do you have with his statement? If you're saying he's wrong then atleast explain why.
One DFW does not have one of the most comprehensive rail systems in the US nor does Houston have one of the best bus systems

neither are particularly PT friendly compared to many other cities and that is the point
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Old 11-26-2014, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Center City
6,855 posts, read 7,802,585 times
Reputation: 9473
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Houston isn't even in the top 50 highest U.S. cities for transit ridership.

Anyway, virtually any U.S. city will have a bus system used by the poor and other people who do not have cars. The difference between good transit and bad transit cities is in the good ones people will willingly use the transit system for work even if they own a car. Largely because it's more of a pain in the butt to find/pay for parking in Downtown (or other key employment centers) than it is to just take the bus or train in.
It seems the facts speak for themselves. I lived in Houston for 26 years before re-locating to Philly a few years back. A significant portion of the bus service consists of "park and rides" which ferry white collar workers to and from their jobs in the CBD. A car is an absolute necessity in Houston unless one wants to endure a lot of hassle.

As to light rail, in the years I lived there, I remember a couple of referendums on rail. One failed just before I arrived in 1984 but another one passed in 1988. Before any work began, Mayor Bob Lanier (a wealthy local developer) was elected a few years to first of his 3 terms on an anti-rail platform. He diverted rail dollars to freeway construction. In 1991, Houston area Congressman Tom DeLay effectively killed $65 million in federal dollars for rail in Houston. Due to this one-two punch, rail in Houston was death a blow for many years.

After much consternation, a starter line was completed in 2004. I say much consternation, because thanks to Tom DeLay, all federal funds were blocked for this project. In addition, several local citizens groups sued Metro, delaying the project further and adding to the cost. Since then, a couple of additional lines are finally under construction but this has not been easy. Unlike many cities where neighborhoods lobby for rail to come to their part of town, several instead have petitioned against rail. Perhaps it is unsightly or brings "those people" into their neighborhood? Further complicating things are a couple of area congressmen who, instead of seeking federal money for rail construction, continue efforts a la DeLay, to block the expenditure of federal dollars for rail (Culberson blocking federal rail money Metro isnít yet asking for - The Highwayman). They may feel they are fighting for the desires of their constituents. I suspect they are also trying to remain in the good favor of deep pocket developers who beneift from road constucion and further "sprawl."

Dallas is a different animal for some reason. While to non-Texans the two cities may seem inter-changeable, Dallas is a bit less higgly-piggly in its development. Rail has done well there and like most cities, and as I understand it, local congressmen worked for funds for rail construction, rather than to block them. The one rail line in Houston has been successful, though the numbers were a bit "artificially" inflated in the early years, if you will, when Metro ferried passengers from local routes that used to run downtown to rail stops just short of downtown. Additional lines are finally being built, however, in spite of all odds. After a generation, rail in the city will be normal, and who knows: perhaps folks will be lobbying for a line to their neighborhood?
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