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Old 11-26-2014, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,756,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
Take out the mountains, and add some humidity, and California becomes Florida. Compare Miami Beach to Venice Beach. Both have heavy Spanish-speaking populations. Both are drug gateways into America from Latin American growers. Both have some really old Spanish missions and forts. Both have a comparable number of large urban areas. Both grow a lot of oranges. I could go on.
No, no, no, and NO. I used to live in Venice Beach. You have to be kidding me. You must be focusing on only the most obvious, superficial aspects (palm trees, beaches). Give me a break! Miami Beach and Venice couldn't be any more different culturally.

Yes, both places have large Spanish-speaking populations and missions. So does Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, Chicago (sans missions), and NYC (sans missions). So what? Besides, in FL it's mostly Cubans and other Carribbeans. In CA it's mostly Mexicans. Two very different cultures that happen to both speak Spanish.

Texas is a bigger "drug gateway" than CA these days. How much does that factor into mainstream culture anyway? Texas also has a large number of urban areas (more than Florida actually), as does Ohio. Arizona grows oranges. So does Texas. Is anybody comparing CA to Texas or Ohio?

I could also go on. For a very long time.
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:19 PM
 
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West Virginia and Arkansas. Landlocked states covered with mountains, had Rockefeller politicians, border non-Southern states even though they are notorious "hillbilly" states, have a single powerhouse college football team with crazy fans, and are both under 3 million people.
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:25 PM
 
462 posts, read 583,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
Texas is a bigger "drug gateway" than CA these days. How much does that factor into mainstream culture anyway?
How do some of the most famous TV shows and movies about drug trafficking (Scarface, Miami Vice, etc.) fit into mainstream culture? Mainstream culture is very much affected by drug use and the war on drugs.

I've been to both states. They seem pretty similar in some ways, different in others. Since they are so far apart geographically, I would consider the similarities significant. I think you are being needlessly contrarian just for the sake of it. Likening Florida/California comparison to Florida/Ohio is stretching. I think if you ask most people in the country what they associate with "beach culture", Florida, and California, and Hawaii are probably going to be their top three. The "left coast" California is pretty exaggerated anyway. How many famous Republicans and evangelical Christians came from that state? I'd say they are up there with Florida in being swing state outside of the major metros.

Last edited by Hamtonfordbury; 11-26-2014 at 03:38 PM..
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Metro Matt View Post
Not really.

Those two states are exact opposite.

Florida doesn't have mountains, its full of old people, its conservative in most parts, its flat, its humid, its semi-tropical, its surrounded on 3 side by water, what else...

I'd say the most similar state to California would be Texas, though superficially.
I'm a native Californian, and I find Florida to be oddly similar to home in many parts. I agree with your California/Texas comparison though too. The two have more in common than many Californians and texans would like to admit.
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
How do some of the most famous TV shows and movies about drug trafficking (Scarface, Miami Vice, etc.) fit into mainstream culture? Mainstream culture is very much affected by drug use and the war on drugs.
The Star Wars and Star Trek franchises are pretty popular too. So then, when was the last time you or anyone you knew flew on a space ship at light-speed to Alderran with a Wookie and had a light saber duel with Darth Vader?

And yes, I'm well aware of how drug use and the drug war affects everyday people. I worked for 5 years in the field of treatment for chemical dependency. Still, drug use and addiction is spread out equally across all 50 states.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
I've been to both states. They seem pretty similar in some ways, different in others. Since they are so far apart geographically, I would consider the similarities significant.
I've lived in one, and spent a lot of time... too much time actually, in the other. The only similarities I saw were beaches, palm trees, and orange groves. Anything else is wishful thinking.
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Old 11-26-2014, 03:58 PM
 
462 posts, read 583,465 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobloblawslawblog View Post
The Star Wars and Star Trek franchises are pretty popular too. So then, when was the last time you or anyone you knew flew on a space ship at light-speed to Alderran with a Wookie and had a light saber duel with Darth Vader?

And yes, I'm well aware of how drug use and the drug war affects everyday people. I worked for 5 years in the field of treatment for chemical dependency. Still, drug use and addiction is spread out equally across all 50 states.

I've lived in one, and spent a lot of time... too much time actually, in the other. The only similarities I saw were beaches, palm trees, and orange groves. Anything else is wishful thinking.
I know enough about the "vast differences" between California and Florida, my mom grew up in California, while my dad grew up in Florida. As I said, I have visited both states quite a few times. I continue to hold the opinion that Florida is basically just the South's version of California, or California is the west's version of Florida, whichever way you want to look at it. If the amount of retirees is a concern, just look a little east to Arizona to rival Florida's snowbirds.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qworldorder View Post
Great comparison--too very similar states
I second that.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamtonfordbury View Post
I know enough about the "vast differences" between California and Florida, my mom grew up in California, while my dad grew up in Florida. As I said, I have visited both states quite a few times. I continue to hold the opinion that Florida is basically just the South's version of California, or California is the west's version of Florida, whichever way you want to look at it. If the amount of retirees is a concern, just look a little east to Arizona to rival Florida's snowbirds.
I'm not trying to change your opinion. I just strongly disagree with it, based on my own actual experience of having lived in L.A. and doing business all over Florida. Believe whatever you want, it makes no difference to me.
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:44 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,924 posts, read 2,026,215 times
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I would also add Delaware and Rhode Island. Both states are primarily urban with a few pockets of coastal, semi-rural character in each state. Also, despite the urban nature of both states, neither has a major tier city within its boundaries (only Providence and Wilmington). But both are functionally tied to large cities (Rhode Island to Boston and Delaware to Philadelphia, and to a lesser extent other Northeastern cities such as Baltimore, DC and NYC being within a couple of hours). Also, both are geographically small.

Last edited by Jowel; 11-26-2014 at 05:33 PM..
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Old 11-26-2014, 04:51 PM
 
1,030 posts, read 1,261,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Though both Minnesotans and Michiganders both know how to drive in the snow, and there are quite a few similarities between Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Minnesota's Iron Range, I otherwise I don't think the two have much in common at all.

The Twin Cities have one of the best economies in the country, while Detroit is, well, Detroit.

The western two-thirds of Minnesota is prairie, whereas all of Michigan is wooded.

Though both states tend to go blue, Minnesota's progressive liberal are a world apart from the populist breed of liberalism you find in Michigan.

Even outside Detroit, cities like Flint, Kalamazoo, Muskegon, Midland, and Saginaw all suffer from varying degrees of urban decay. There is no urban decay in Minnesota.

Though there are Finns in the UP, Michigan lacks the Scandinavian influence that so heavily influences Minnesota. Minnesota lacks the Polish influence that is so prevalent in Michigan. In terms of immigrants, Minnesota has Somali, Hmong, Mexicans, Russians, and Ecuadorians. Michigan has Arabs, lots and lots of Arabs, as well as some Bosnians.

Minnesota winters are frigidly cold and brilliantly sunny. Michigan winters are overcast and gloomy.

In terms of the arts, Michigan is a great reputation for the beaux arts, while Minnesota is more well know for contemporary art, dance, and theatre.

In my opinion, the state most like Michigan that does not boarder Michigan is Upstate New York.
Mostly a solid post. I'd put the prairie in MN at about 1/4 to 1/3 of the western part though, certainly not 2/3.
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