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View Poll Results: Is Michigan More Like Minnesota or Upstate New York
Minnesota 54 58.70%
Upstate New York 38 41.30%
Voters: 92. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 11-26-2014, 08:33 PM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chh View Post
Upstate New York has no farmland.
Quite possibly one of he most inaccurate statements I have ever read on C-D.
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Old 11-27-2014, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert_SW_77 View Post
Quite possibly one of he most inaccurate statements I have ever read on C-D.
^ this is probably the biggest exaggeration in the history of the universe
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Old 11-27-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Minnesota because its pretty flat, Upstate New York is more like New England and Pennsylvania.
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Old 11-27-2014, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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This map is a bit deceptive. It's an oversimplified version of what Minnesota looked like before it was developed. One, the map makes it look like there are clear, distinct boundaries between these zones, which is not the case. Also, the part of the map labeled "deciduous forest" is now mostly farm land. There isn't much deciduous forest left there at all, safe for the driftless area in the far southeast corner of the state. Because of all the farms and development the "prairie grassland" and the "deciduous forest" regions basically look the same.
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Old 11-27-2014, 10:40 AM
 
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I would say Michigan is more similar to the western half of New York state than the eastern half. Its the eastern half is where the mountains are. And Buffalo being a Great Lakes state with similar background factors in.




And as far as comparisons to Minnesota: Minnesotas northwoods are more "true boreal forest" with mostly conifers, and aspens. Michigans forests have a lot of the same composition. And a vast chunk of Minnesota was presettlement prairie with hardly any trees. So the farmlands are more like Iowa, whereas Michigans farmlands do have groves, patches of woods more similar to further east.

I would say if you were to just look at the western half of New York state, then I think Michigan is more similar to New York than to Minnesota.



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Old 11-27-2014, 10:47 AM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tex?Il? View Post
I would say Michigan is more similar to the western half of New York state than the eastern half. Its the eastern half is where the mountains are. And Buffalo being a Great Lakes state with similar background factors in.



I agree, that small non mountainous green region south of Lake Ontario and North of the Finger Lakes can be compared to Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
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Old 11-27-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Both have very few, if any, Lutherans.
While Catholicism dominates upstate New York, to say there are few, if any, Lutherans is incorrect.

Map of Lutheran congregations in upstate New York

In similarity with Michigan, there are also a lot of (Dutch) Reformed churches reflecting New York's Dutch colonial history and settlement.
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Old 11-27-2014, 11:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post

This map is a bit deceptive. It's an oversimplified version of what Minnesota looked like before it was developed. One, the map makes it look like there are clear, distinct boundaries between these zones, which is not the case. Also, the part of the map labeled "deciduous forest" is now mostly farm land. There isn't much deciduous forest left there at all, safe for the driftless area in the far southeast corner of the state. Because of all the farms and development the "prairie grassland" and the "deciduous forest" regions basically look the same.
The map is not of a previous era, but rather the current one. The MN DNR has great information on the biomes of the state, and your 2/3 prairie calculation does not line up with the facts, any way that you want to spin them:

Coniferous forest - Biomes of Minnesota: Minnesota DNR

Deciduous forest - Biomes of Minnesota: Minnesota DNR

Tallgrass Aspen Parkland-Biomes of Minnesota: Minnesota DNR

Prairie grassland - Biomes of Minnesota: Minnesota DNR
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Old 11-27-2014, 12:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I agree, that small non mountainous green region south of Lake Ontario and North of the Finger Lakes can be compared to Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
That is essentially the flat(ter) lands between Lake Ontario and the Appalachian Plateau. It covers a relatively narrow area, which includes Rochester.

The difference even between western/central Upstate NY and Michigan are the hills/valleys in that part of NY. There are a lot of ski areas in that area of NY.
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Old 11-27-2014, 01:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I agree, that small non mountainous green region south of Lake Ontario and North of the Finger Lakes can be compared to Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.
There are hills in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin that are comparable to what you find in the western New York and even the Catskills. It just takes a little longer to get to them. The only area that has no comparison at all in the midwestern states are the adirondacks:

Driftless Area of Wisconsin:



Baraboo Hills of Wisconsin:



Huron Mountains near Marquette, MI



Porcupine Mountains of Michigan:



New York state is overall more scenic than any midwestern state overall, but with the exception of the Adirondacks, you can find the same scenic areas, with the same type of forests in the upper midwest. You do have to look.
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