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Old 11-29-2014, 07:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Let me ask you this. Do southern natives that live in larger urban areas experience some degree of culture shock when visiting a rural area of the South?
For southern natives, I don't think so. But yeah, it's a different story for non-natives. I was with one of my friends and his family who moved to Raleigh from the UK about seven years ago. We were driving through a small town about 25-30 miles outside of town. Wow. They thought it was a scene from Dukes of Hazzard or something, and it wasn't even that bad! To them, it was a culture shock. They barely leave the Research Triangle area, so rural NC was a completely different story.

 
Old 11-29-2014, 07:31 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
Yes they do. Just take someone from metro Atlanta and drop them off in a town like Claxton, GA. They wouldn't know what to do with themselves.

I watched the Madea Christmas movie (Tyler Perry) yesterday, and as everyone knows, it's always based in Atlanta. Part of that movie was set in Alabama and they acted like it was supposed to be nothing but farms, KKK meetings, and one room schools with only 15 students, despite that fact that AL is only a 1.5 hour drive from Atlanta. All I could do was shake my head and think "I know they didn't" .
Atlanta people LOVE poking fun at Alabama, I've noticed that. And yes, it's not even that far! I asked a friend from Atlanta if he visited Alabama often. "No! Why would I go over there? There's nothing in Alabama."
 
Old 11-29-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,024 posts, read 31,400,710 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Atlanta people LOVE poking fun at Alabama, I've noticed that. And yes, it's not even that far! I asked a friend from Atlanta if he visited Alabama often. "No! Why would I go over there? There's nothing in Alabama."
Yes, and I'll admit that Alabamians poke fun at Mississippi too. We're allowed to, but you let a non-Southerner do it and we'll come out fightin'.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 07:52 AM
 
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Probably never.

The south is the most socially conservative and relatively speaking also one of the poorest areas of the country...outside of appalachia....

Of course we all know that a lot of areas have huge middle classes and wealthy people, but that whole "the south" vibe will continue as long as that accent continues...as long as getting married at 22 is a thing... that stereotypical image of the south will never die.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LexusNexus View Post
When this region stops automatically being deep RED every election year, supporting policies, laws, and beliefs that bigoted, backwards, racist, and hillbilly people embrace. This is a clear signal that the region is still fighting the Civil War, still supporting Dixie, still favoring Jim Crow, and still having more in common with the Klan than not. Sure, there are some extraordinary people there, fine, magnificent people. But there still exists enough of the racist, supremely ignorant, bigoted, backwards contingent in that region to keep it tipped in the wrong direction. Until this changes, I don't care how beautiful it looks in parts. People will change their opinion of the region when the region itself undergoes a true change in its core and foundation. This certainly won't occur during my lifetime. It likely will not happen for centuries, if ever.
This is exactly the kind of rhetoric I'd expect from a California liberal. Don't get me wrong, I'm liberal in most areas too, but I guess I'm a little more enlightened because I don't make blanket assumptions on an area due to their voting styles or the fact that they were on the wrong side of a ware 150 years ago.

33 states now have republic governors, I'm guessing even Maryland, Illinois, Ohio, New Jersey, Michigan, Wisconsin, and others are now RED states because they have republican governors.

I'm pretty glad I spent several years living in the south, it opened my eyes to see past the bigoted stereotypes most people automatically equate with the people who live there. The Deep South of the 21st century is virtually unrecognizable from the Deep South of the 1960's. There is interracial dating, there are black mayors and black congressmen, blacks and whites openly socialize in public settings. I myself was surprised at how friendly a very southern black woman was with what seemed to be a very backwoodsy homegrown white man with camo clothes. Not saying everything is perfect and peachy, but the South has traveled MILES in terms of progression. The ideas you blanket southerners with was mostly true about 50 years ago, the 21st century is a different time.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
199 posts, read 202,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ColdAilment View Post
This is exactly the kind of rhetoric I'd expect from a California liberal. Don't get me wrong, I'm liberal in most areas too, but I guess I'm a little more enlightened because I don't make blanket assumptions on an area due to their voting styles or the fact that they were on the wrong side of a ware 150 years ago.

33 states now have republic governors, I'm guessing even Maryland, Illinois, Ohio, New Jersey, Michigan, Wisconsin, and others are now RED states because they have republican governors.

I'm pretty glad I spent several years living in the south, it opened my eyes to see past the bigoted stereotypes most people automatically equate with the people who live there. The Deep South of the 21st century is virtually unrecognizable from the Deep South of the 1960's. There is interracial dating, there are black mayors and black congressmen, blacks and whites openly socialize in public settings. I myself was surprised at how friendly a very southern black woman was with what seemed to be a very backwoodsy homegrown white man with camo clothes. Not saying everything is perfect and peachy, but the South has traveled MILES in terms of progression. The ideas you blanket southerners with was mostly true about 50 years ago, the 21st century is a different time.
Don't assume that the states have permanently swapped, it's the midterms, a lot of people didn't go out and vote. And I do actually think Southern Hospitality is a true thing, it's just only applicable to some people.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 08:41 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
For southern natives, I don't think so. But yeah, it's a different story for non-natives. I was with one of my friends and his family who moved to Raleigh from the UK about seven years ago. We were driving through a small town about 25-30 miles outside of town. Wow. They thought it was a scene from Dukes of Hazzard or something, and it wasn't even that bad! To them, it was a culture shock. They barely leave the Research Triangle area, so rural NC was a completely different story.
What'd they see that was so shocking?
 
Old 11-29-2014, 08:45 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Maryland, DC, DE, and Northern VA aren't the South, in the context of 2014. Neither is most of Florida. No one thinks of Bethesda, MD as "the south".

Maryland is more similar to the NYC, Philly and Boston suburbs than anywhere in the south, so unless Long Island and Connecticut are "the South", no one should be using Maryland to disprove the stereotypes about poverty in the South.
Not all of Maryland is like Bethesda most of it isn't. Nor are the DC suburbs that similar to NYC, Philly or Boston suburbs. At the other extreme, Prince Georges County has more in common with Atlanta suburbs than anything in the Northeast. Anyway, Maryland has been richer than average US state for a long time. Even in 1950 when it still had some Jim Crow laws around.

The gap between the south and the rest of the country is much smaller than years ago.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Mishawaka, Indiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostbite82 View Post
Don't assume that the states have permanently swapped, it's the midterms, a lot of people didn't go out and vote. And I do actually think Southern Hospitality is a true thing, it's just only applicable to some people.
I'm not. I'm showing how idiotic the kind of thinking that just because a state elects republican officials means it's a red state and therefore backwards. Should have kept reading my post. Hence why I put, "I'm guessing even (states) are now RED" Red was in caps, emphasis on that.
 
Old 11-29-2014, 09:06 AM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,813,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Not all of Maryland is like Bethesda most of it isn't. Nor are the DC suburbs that similar to NYC, Philly or Boston suburbs. At the other extreme, Prince Georges County has more in common with Atlanta suburbs than anything in the Northeast. Anyway, Maryland has been richer than average US state for a long time. Even in 1950 when it still had some Jim Crow laws around.

The gap between the south and the rest of the country is much smaller than years ago.
Fairfax county, Arlington county and Montgomery county resemble Bergen county, Suffolk county, etc. They are VERY similar with a difference in demographics. Even Northern VA resembles Northern NJ, like I said earlier. It's like someone plopped down a part of NJ and put it in Virginia. It's a very out of place region in it's own state. I'm not saying they are exactly alike but they are very similar. I stayed in Bergen county with my ex a little bit after college, I loved it being that I'm Jewish but it felt like I was in Rockville or Bethesda with twice as many kosher delis.
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