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Old 11-29-2014, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Montana
522 posts, read 555,593 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Deluusions View Post
Now I'm being rude, see the difference?
Nope, not really... I guess my mind is too "ignorant".
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Old 11-29-2014, 06:20 PM
 
1,833 posts, read 1,812,357 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoanCrawford View Post
Nope, not really... I guess my mind is too "ignorant".
You're catching on! Good job!
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Old 12-01-2014, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
1,704 posts, read 2,763,360 times
Reputation: 2335
Quote:
Originally Posted by almondding View Post
What makes say OKC different from KC? Or either from Minneapolis. We know nothing about those cities!
What makes them them?
In OKC you can tell you are in the South. Not as much activity downtown, lots of identical houses, etc. There's also a really really big American Indian population, and there are American Indian motifs in a lot of the design of the city.

KC is really at the crossroads of Plains culture and Southern culture and Midwestern culture. There are a lot of nice quiet tree-lined areas in the urban core (the area around the Nelson Atkins museum is one of these). Then there's also quite a bit of urban grit surrounding Union Station and the Crossroads District - the kind of urban grit that feels more on-the-edge-of-success than crumbling-and-dying (although there are places on the Kansas side that do feel very depressing). It's not as active at street level as St. Louis, but whenever I'm in KC I feel like I'm in this really cool place that no one knows about yet. The landscape throughout the whole metro goes from like densely-forested river bluffs to flat plains. A lot of the suburbs are seriously conservative, but the core is quite working-class liberal, so it can also feel like two different worlds right next to each other.

Minneapolis is Seattle with more visible diversity. There are significant Somali and Hmong populations. Lakes everywhere, you can't go two feet without hitting a lake. Architecturally there are lots of sailboat motifs and a LOT of inspiration from the Northwoods/log cabin aesthetic. St. Paul is more forested and laid-back, with older buildings and generally a more eastern US vibe, as compared to the more western US vibe in Minneapolis. The skyway systems in both cities give them both a unique visual identity. Seems like you also see the blue-white-yellow-red scheme of Metro Transit in a lot of different places throughout the cities. I tend to think of Minneapolis as a "city of neighborhoods," kind of like people say about Toronto. There is a distinctly different vibe in Midtown (working-class, multicultural), for example, than in Whittier (artsy, laid-back), which is different from Dinkytown (young, wild), which is different from Uptown (trendy, hipster), which is different from the Warehouse District (fast-paced, urban), etc. Twin Cities suburbs range from driftless and river bluffs to dense lake forests to rolling prairie hills and oak savanna. It's really nothing like Oklahoma City though, and it's not that similar to Kansas City either.

Quote:
And the BIG ones (heh) - Dallas & Houston.
Other than "Texan", "cowboy", "oil", "southern" we know nothing about them.
What's the difference between Dallas & Houston? And even San Antonio?
As in, is one slower paced, ruder, friendlier, noisier, etc.
I can't say much about Houston, but Dallas feels like kind of a generic Big American City to me. That's not a bad thing necessarily. Lots of parking lots, very tall buildings, public art, modest rail transit. Fort Worth feels a little humbler and trendier, kind of like Kansas City. The metro is also HUUUUUUUGE and it feels like there are cars and freeways everywhere. Gigantic spaghetti bowl freeway interchanges. Amazing Mexican food. I had the best enchiladas of my life at a strip mall in Fort Worth. The suburbs go on for ten thousand years.

I was only in Houston once and it was just over night, but the sense I got was that it was even more spread out than DFW and sooooooooooooooo humid I thought I would drown.

San Antonio is weird because it's thriving and totally exciting and cool - and also extra-touristy - if you go to the Alamo and the Riverwalk and El Mercado, but the rest of it is pretty quiet. It feels way more Mexican than DFW, like you can tell you're closer to the border.

Quote:
Everyone can describe NOLA, but what about St Louis?
St. Louis is a mix of Kansas City and Chicago. More of an eastern US built-up urban landscape than KC, but much quieter and more spread-out than Chicago. Sort of feels like the soul of the city revolves around the Mississippi River, though not to the extent of NOLA or even Memphis. And of course there's major racial segregation like many other cities, etc etc, this is not the place to get into that though.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:02 PM
 
21,193 posts, read 30,372,337 times
Reputation: 19627
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoanCrawford View Post
Jesus, you people need to get some manners. If you don't agree with me than move on, perhaps? Everybody has a different sense of "vibe", and I can't help it that that's what I felt when I go there. And no, DC does NOT bustle with people the way New York does.
I normally have great manners, until someone makes an idiotic statement in an authoritative manner. You said hardly anyone actually lives in DC and suggested it emptied out at night. To someone who high tails it to the suburbs at 5pm each day it may seem that way to you, though for giggles you ought to take a look around at in-town neighborhoods like Dupont Circle/Logan, Adams Morgan, Georgetown, Foggy Bottom/West End, Cleveland Park, Friendship Heights, Chinatown and Eastern Market where hundreds of restaurants, bars, shops and other retailers thrive thanks to neighborhood residents. DC is a city of neighborhoods beyond the monuments and museums if one bothers to take notice, and while not NYC thriving (what other city is?) it certainly holds it's own with other major cities.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:20 PM
 
Location: New York City
1,254 posts, read 1,098,295 times
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NYC: Big northern city, extreme hustle and bustle, street grind, gritty, people are very direct, kinda provincial.
Philly: Big northern city, city of neighborhoods, hustle and bustle, gritty, charming, kinda ghetto
Baltimore: A village that pretends to be a city, quiant, gritty, mix of north and south, hustle and bustle, high rates of drinking and drugging, ghetto, slower paced than other east coast cities, provincial, kinda poor, mix of urban and country.
DC: Clean, green, large amount of transplants, bland in parts, ghetto in parts, hustle and bustle, mix of north and south, diverse.

Richmond: Small, southern, quiant, slow pace of life, country.
Atlanta: Southern, sprawly, the type of place where you go hangout at the barbershop, chill at walmart, and go to a party in a stripmall. Country...
Charlotte: Just like ATL.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,752,033 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
I was only in Houston once and it was just over night, but the sense I got was that it was even more spread out than DFW and sooooooooooooooo humid I thought I would drown.
No, it's no more spread out than DFW. It's about equally sprawled. The difference is DFW is two separate metros that joined together, therefore it has two separate hubs... and Houston only has one. The DFW area is slightly larger than Houston, both in terms of population and land area, but in terms of density they're pretty much the same. Houston actually has a slightly more dense core.
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Old 12-01-2014, 02:56 PM
 
Location: League City
3,379 posts, read 6,597,549 times
Reputation: 3985
Quote:
Originally Posted by almondding View Post
So we were thinking...
...
And the BIG ones (heh) - Dallas & Houston.
Other than "Texan", "cowboy", "oil", "southern" we know nothing about them.
What's the difference between Dallas & Houston? And even San Antonio?
As in, is one slower paced, ruder, friendlier, noisier, etc.
What defines Cleveland? And how does it differ from Columbus?
Everyone can describe NOLA, but what about St Louis?
Sound off CDers!
Dallas and Houston are not southern. You can certainly find lots of southern elements in either city, but there's a whole lot more than that.

Also Ft Worth is far more 'Cowboy' than Dallas and Houston even though you can certainly find cowboy stuff in all three. But other than FtW, 'Cowboy' doesn't describe any big city in Tx.

Houston is far more international than people give it credit. It has Johnson Space Center (with NASA presence of Russian, Japanese, ESA, Canadian space agencies), a massive international port that is among the busiest in the world, the largest medical center in the world (that treats celebrities and Saudi princes), and massive oil/gas operations that spread it's tentacles across the globe. I think only 2-3 cities in the US have more foreign consulates than Houston. Houston is a boring place to visit. But it is a great place to live if you aren't wealthy. San Antonio is more of a tourist destination where as Dallas and Houston are more of business destinations. San Antone has a ton of history and is purposefully not glamorous and glitzy, but has a stunning downtown nonetheless. It's also adjacent to the Texas Hill Country where Texans love to go unwind and enjoy the scenery. Ft Worth also has a surprising amount of touristy things to see and do. Dallas is also known for the 30000 millionaire phenomenon so the Houston press often ribs Dallas as being more pretentious. CNN once rated a Dallas suburb (Plano) as the wealthiest large city in the nation. Austin has been infested with Californians and hipsters. I avoid it now days.

Last edited by DanielWayne; 12-01-2014 at 03:05 PM..
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Old 12-01-2014, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,752,033 times
Reputation: 2258
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielWayne View Post
Houston is a boring place to visit. But it is a great place to live if you aren't wealthy.
That's changing pretty quickly. Inner-loop Houston, which is the only part of Houston I would even consider living in, is getting quite expensive at a very rapid rate. Not much difference now in terms of COL than Austin. The suburbs are still affordable, but no one could pay me to live in Houston's suburban areas.
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Old 12-01-2014, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Hollywood, CA
1,576 posts, read 2,537,194 times
Reputation: 1119
Los Angeles. A Multi-cultural, Choatic, Decentralized city with multiple personalities and warm weather all year. From the Glamour and Hollywood Showiness of West Los Angeles to the gritty Eastside full of immigrants from many different parts of the world. Many parts of Los Angeles feels more international than American.

San Diego. A Laid Back Beach city where people never grow up. More conservative than Los Angeles due to the large military presence.

San Francisco. The tech capital of the Western World. Large Asian presence compared to most American cities. Has become more corporate due to the tech presence in the last 10 years.

Portland. Feels more like a large town than a large city of over 500,000 people. Hipster, Granola, and a large young transient population in a city where "Young People Go to Retire".
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Old 12-01-2014, 09:51 PM
 
4,812 posts, read 4,997,343 times
Reputation: 2276
San Francisco - A bubble of relevent trend setting multi-racial kindred spirits living in a concentrated, dense, focused, volitile, happening, evolving, aging, wealthy, dirty yet clean and growing metropolis.
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