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Old 12-03-2014, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,643 posts, read 7,445,655 times
Reputation: 4316

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigboyz06 View Post
Which sunbelt city/cities in your opinion do you see making the biggest transformations in the coming years? This includes urban projects, population growth. Doesn't have to necessarily be the biggest cities in the region either. A lot of mid sized cities could be included also.
Call me an optimist, but I haven't given up on Phoenix just yet. When you say making the biggest transformation in coming years, I think of how Phoenix has lost out on some great opportunities or the urban planners haven't done as good of a job as they should have. At some point, that needs/is going to change. There were so many great proposals that never came to fruition as a result of either poor planning or the recession. Right now, Tempe is going through quite a transformation with several projects in the works and is obviously doing something right. So, not only is Phoenix having to compete with other cities, but it is already competing with its own suburbs. I think the city leaders are finally realizing what needs to change - focusing less on the growth model of the past and creating a vision that focuses more on the urban form code and thoughtful development that encourages a more walkable, vibrant core, while luring more diverse industries. Also, making the lot sizes less imposing, reconnecting streets, and not selling land to the cheapest bidders so that land remains vacant for some time. Phoenix has the framework, but now it needs to start filling in the gaps and connecting the dots.
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Old 12-03-2014, 06:34 AM
 
3,955 posts, read 3,489,082 times
Reputation: 6331
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
Call me an optimist, but I haven't given up on Phoenix just yet. When you say making the biggest transformation in coming years, I think of how Phoenix has lost out on some great opportunities or the urban planners haven't done as good of a job as they should have. At some point, that needs/is going to change. There were so many great proposals that never came to fruition as a result of either poor planning or the recession. Right now, Tempe is going through quite a transformation with several projects in the works and is obviously doing something right. So, not only is Phoenix having to compete with other cities, but it is already competing with its own suburbs. I think the city leaders are finally realizing what needs to change - focusing less on the growth model of the past and creating a vision that focuses more on the urban form code and thoughtful development that encourages a more walkable, vibrant core, while luring more diverse industries. Also, making the lot sizes less imposing, reconnecting streets, and not selling land to the cheapest bidders so that land remains vacant for some time. Phoenix has the framework, but now it needs to start filling in the gaps and connecting the dots.
Seeing Phoenix where it is now vs. where it has come from I would absolutely agree with you. It has such untapped potential. Phoenix suffers from a form of Detroit syndrome where it's suburbs are as powerful as the core. They compete for the same development dollars and capital, making it evenly spread throughout the metro area. This kind of fractured regionalism leads to a stunted core as there is no clear vision for the metro areas affected by it. Often multiple mediocre cores exist vs. one identifiable strong one. It's actually fairly common in the sunbelt cities that grew up and were planned around the automobile, vs. the densely packed older cities that were planned based on foot traffic, and the need to be close to the core.

The trend of people being attracted to the urban core started in PHX over a decade ago. When I lived there, there were a lot of proposals often quite ambitious. The biggest problem was never a lack of vision but rather the change averse, bat **** crazy residents that would resort to lawsuits to prevent change. It was that population segment that did everything they could to keep the valley as mediocre as possible. It's been six years since i've lived in Phoenix and am not as up on the happenings as I used to be so I don't know if this has started to change.
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Old 12-03-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Prince George's County, Maryland
6,212 posts, read 7,385,629 times
Reputation: 2581
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
A lot of big, exciting things happening in many Sunbelt cities ... which must frustrate folks in the Northeast and Midwest.
No. Maybe on this site by a handful of posters, but in reality?
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Old 12-04-2014, 05:43 AM
 
3,955 posts, read 3,489,082 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tcave360 View Post
No. Maybe on this site by a handful of posters, but in reality?
I don't really even see it on this site to be honest.
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Old 12-04-2014, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Who Cares, USA
2,343 posts, read 2,750,537 times
Reputation: 2258
What I don't get is that if one region is growing and prospering, then it only adds to the entire nation's growth and prosperity as a whole. Why should anybody be envious or even care if one region is doing better than any other? From what I can tell, it's just another lame excuse for regional bickering and in-fighting. So unproductive and pointless.

Many sunbelt cities are doing very well right now. Others are stagnant. Some are even in decline. Certain cities in other regions: Northeast, Pacific Northwest, Midwest, and Intermountain West are also doing very well, while other cities in each of these regions are hurting. It's all relative. Why is the in-fighting even necessary at all?

Personally, I cheer on and congratulate any city that's making progress, regardless of which region it's in... sunbelt or otherwise.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Chicago
1,466 posts, read 1,039,886 times
Reputation: 516
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
A lot of big, exciting things happening in many Sunbelt cities ... which must frustrate folks in the Northeast and Midwest.
Why? What kind of idiot would be upset at other parts of the country doing well?
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:04 PM
 
29,893 posts, read 27,345,109 times
Reputation: 18435
I agree. I'm a Southerner but I'm rooting for the Rustbelt to make a full recovery, and it's exciting to see the progress being made there.
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:52 AM
 
Location: Texarkana, Tx
287 posts, read 432,703 times
Reputation: 171
I'd be very interested to see where Asheville, Charleston and Savannah will be 15 years from now.
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Old 12-05-2014, 02:10 AM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,953,389 times
Reputation: 9512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I agree. I'm a Southerner but I'm rooting for the Rustbelt to make a full recovery, and it's exciting to see the progress being made there.
It was a joke ...
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Tampa
734 posts, read 732,070 times
Reputation: 759
Downtown Tampa is transforming by the day. Good news yesterday is that USF agreed to build their new medical center downtown thanks to a 1 acre gift from Tampa Bay Lightning owner Jeff Vinik who owns a huge chunk of currently wasted space in downtown and is about to announce his grand vision for the area. His effort is backed in part by Bill Gates' foundation. Things are about to pick up some serious steam.
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