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Old 12-02-2014, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,351 times
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Forgive me my scrutinies around here but in many threads I have read about pace of different places. How to understand this?

If one is referring to a particular area as to fast-paced one, does it mean that people who live there are very industrious and hard-working? Then it would be highly offensive to Southerners to hear that the South is slow-paced, as it would imply that Southerners are idle and unable to handle business.

On the other hand, I had a feeling several times while reading some threads here, that being fast-paced is nearly an insult towards, in particular, New York City and its citizens, and is used to describe typical Northern attitude to money in a derogative way. Then, the slower pace of a place may seem as a positive feature. And indeed for some, even Southerners, it is.

Are rural areas inevitable slow-paced and the more developed region is, the faster-paced it will be?

So how it is seen? And what region of the United States is, in your experience, the slowest-paced?
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Old 12-02-2014, 09:31 PM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,050,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yenisey View Post
Forgive me my scrutinies around here but in many threads I have read about pace of different places. How to understand this?

If one is referring to a particular area as to fast-paced one, does it mean that people who live there are very industrious and hard-working? Then it would be highly offensive to Southerners to hear that the South is slow-paced, as it would imply that Southerners are idle and unable to handle business.

On the other hand, I had a feeling several times while reading some threads here, that being fast-paced is nearly an insult towards, in particular, New York City and its citizens, and is used to describe typical Northern attitude to money in a derogative way. Then, the slower pace of a place may seem as a positive feature. And indeed for some, even Southerners, it is.

Are rural areas inevitable slow-paced and the more developed region is, the faster-paced it will be?

So how it is seen? And what region of the United States is, in your experience, the slowest-paced?
Tucson, AZ is one of the the slowest-paced cities in the US that I've had the pleasure of visiting on multiple occasions, even slower-paced than many medium-sized Southern cities like Charleston, SC and Raleigh, NC.

I think this is due to the fact that Tucson has a large retiree/snowbird contingent, many of whom hail from small towns in the Midwest or Intermountain West where the pace of life is often much slower than in major coastal and inland cities; a very large student population (college students have a lot of idle time on their hands); the general lack of industry, especially white-collar industry; a strong emphasis on relaxation tourism (e.g., spas, pools, physical activities such as golf and hiking, etc.); the serene Sonoran desert scenery; and the generally docile weather.

Also, it seems like people in the West are more likely to "stop and smell the roses" compared to folks elsewhere due in part to the dramatic, often breathtaking scenery; carefree, laid-back, optimistic culture; and a strong reverence for nature. This is especially pronounced in Tucson, which is a place where people often move for the gorgeous scenery, beautiful weather, magnificent sunsets, highly varied outdoor recreational opportunities -- in essence, lifestyle reasons. That's why activities like hiking, photography, and watching sunsets are so popular in Tucson -- many people move there for those reasons alone.

IMO, all of this gives Tucson a vibe of tranquility that's often unmatched in many other cities, especially outside of the Southwest. FWIW, I felt similar vibes in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, but I don't know those cities as well as I know Tucson, so that's why I refrained from selecting either or.

The South, OTOH, is slow-paced, especially in the smaller towns and rural areas, but I think the South is a lot more influenced by the fast-paced environment of the Northeast than, say, the Southwest due to geographic proximity and a general infiltration of Nor'easters in Southern cities over the past few decades, especially in the Southeast. FL, for example, is much faster-paced than anywhere in the West, including urban CA, which is traditionally the fastest-paced environment you get out West. I would even go so far as to say cities like Atlanta, Charlotte, and increasingly Raleigh are faster-paced than even behemoth Western cities like Denver and Phoenix.

Nor'easters don't seem to mellow out all that much in the Southeast, either, like they do in the West. I think this is partly due to the fact that there are such large concentrations of Nor'easters in the Southeastern cities. Coupled with the generally inclusive mentality and a superiority complex, especially over Southerners, Nor'easters tend to "stick to their own" in the Southeast. Also, they're not really a group of people who "when in Rome, do as the Romans do," so to speak, which is why Southeastern cities are becoming increasingly faster-paced with more diluted local cultures each passing year. Within a generation or so, the rest of the urban Southeast with have a FL vibe for sure, especially in the major metro areas.
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Old 12-03-2014, 08:01 AM
 
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It depends on where in the Northeast the people/person is from too. Basically, the further inland, the slower and more mellow the people tend to be.
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Old 12-03-2014, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
It depends on where in the Northeast the people/person is from too. Basically, the further inland, the slower and more mellow the people tend to be.
Agreed. "Pace" is honestly a function of the extent of a urban environment, as opposed to a regional attribute. Any lower-density area is going to seem much more laid back by comparison.
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Old 12-04-2014, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,351 times
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So there is an equation between pace and level of urbanization?

The more place is populated the faster-paced it is?
O maybe the more densely populated place become, the faster-paced it will be?
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:10 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 22,989,204 times
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I think it's cultural, as well as having to do with urbanization. For instance, in Mexico, whether you are in a small town or a huge city, people don't mind waiting in long lines forever. Even if they are on their way somewhere, they will stop to help someone for however long it takes.

This may be one reason Tucson is "laid-back," if it's influenced by the Mexican culture.

But, when I think of a fast-paced area, the visual I get are Moms and Dads who work 40+ hours and then also have their kids involved in all types of sports and activities, and are themselves on committees, etc., etc., etc. They are overbooked, and design their lives that way.

Those types of people can be found everywhere. But, in some cultures, you'd be a real weirdo if you lived your life like that. Texas is another example of a laid-back culture.

Basically, in my opinion, a laid-back area - or a slower paced area - is an area where people don't overbook their lives.

Balance. I guess the word is balance. Some areas are not only more conducive to balance, but they will actually make you feel like a weirdo who needs counseling if you don't also figure out how to get some balance and mellow out.

Picture a huge city in Italy, for instance, and can't you envision the people still having time to have dinner with their family? Visit with friends?

My friends who live in the SF Bay Area, for instance, are always so overbooked with their work and activities and their kids' activities, that I rarely get to see them. They were like that before they got married and had kids, too. My Canadian friend, on the other hand, also works full time and commutes, but has plenty of time to Skype me, and to visit with friends and family.

So, it's not a matter of being industrious. You can do that between 9 & 5pm, and prioritize the rest of your time in such a way, that you don't feel like shooting the clerk at the grocery store if she takes time to chat with a customer - which was the case for me when I went to TN. I was the impatient twit in line, who couldn't believe people would just start chatting with their customers. I finally got into the flow - or the pace - and things went better for me there. Kind of like when you go to Costco - you never go in a hurry.
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:29 PM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I think it's cultural, as well as having to do with urbanization. For instance, in Mexico, whether you are in a small town or a huge city, people don't mind waiting in long lines forever. Even if they are on their way somewhere, they will stop to help someone for however long it takes.
I think you are confusing two things. Waiting in a queue can drive someone's mad because it is useless time. Time which can arranged far more proper. That is the case. And time in which you help somebody, is an entirely different situation. It is a time which cannot be used more properly.

And from what you have wrote, it seems like slow-paced equals idle and inneficient, not directly, but still.

And I think this is misunderstanding of slow-paced places, or I hope it to be. I always preffered Southern culture, for instance, mainly for its hospitality and for being more Christian-like in overall, which is taken as slow-paced, but when I read stuff like yours, I tend to think that living outside New York City must be something like forced retirement.

So I will like you to explain further, if you like. And I encourage others.

Last edited by Yenisey; 12-04-2014 at 07:48 PM.. Reason: To clarify the meaning of the message
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Old 12-04-2014, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,124 posts, read 22,989,204 times
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Your idea that all time must be productive - would fit perfectly in a fast-paced area. This is exactly what I'm talking about.

It's a matter of what you value. I value my peace of mind more than being productive during the time between when I arrive at a store and when I check out. I don't plan anything that needs to happen 5 minutes after I arrive at the store. That way, I can be patient with the people around me, and usually, leave feeling relaxed.

Doing it your way, would put me into an early grave, where you'd be looking at your watch and feeling like killing the people chatting with the checker ahead of you.

I think your definition of being Christian-like is someone who finds time for other people. People who don't overbook their lives can take time for other people.

I find your definition of yourself wanting to be productive constantly, at complete odds with your love of the Southern culture. If you move there, I think you will need to adjust your "pace."

If you don't understand me yet, Oh well.
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Old 12-04-2014, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,351 times
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Yes, now I understand you, because you have made yourself clear this time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Your idea that all time must be productive - would fit perfectly in a fast-paced area. This is exactly what I'm talking about.
So that is the core of a pace. So I am really fast-paced accroding to this definition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I think your definition of being Christian-like is someone who finds time for other people. People who don't overbook their lives can take time for other people.
Yes, it is. And as I have stated, offering your time to another person is the most proper way of spending that time. But, as you do not know you future, I consider to organize my time as my duty. I am not saying that someone who do not is wrong. I do not judge. But I cannot deny myself. And people like myself, consider organizing as natural, as natural, as you consider being open minded. I think we understand each other on that matter. Sloth is a Christian vice. No offence, or no blame or accusation of you. I am very grateful, that you answered me. I am not saying slow-paced equals slothful, it would be very heavy accusation. It seems that God gave us just different personalities. May He be blessed for that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I find your definition of yourself wanting to be productive constantly, at complete odds with your love of the Southern culture. If you move there, I think you will need to adjust your "pace."
I am aware of it. But one thing, I am not in love with Southern culture, meaning, I want to be a part of it. No, I represent totally different culture, and it would be very unsensitive of me to do something of the sort. I would like to research the South, and I am looking at the South as my patient on which I will be conducting a medical operation, not regard myself as a Southerner.

And even someone who live in the South, do not you think, have no need to alter himself to its pace? For example, someone who live in the South, but does not have spouse from the South, does not regard himself as part of Southern heritage, have most of his friends from say the North, just living and working in the South. I think it is possible to be only i some areas of life or to some degree adjusted to a pace of a certain place. I am not describing my situation at all.
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Old 12-05-2014, 11:07 AM
 
447 posts, read 580,887 times
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IMO, I typically think of 'pace' as being a scale between time and money. Fast paced places are extremely time obsessed. The most important question for them is "How long is this going to take?" Everything costs money - a lot of it. If you live in a big city, you typically earn and spend a lot of money - that's just part of life. Time is the most precious resource. A slow paced environment is usually reversed. Rural areas, high percentages of retirees on fixed incomes, poorer areas, etc. have an abundance of time and a scarcity of money. The more important question is "How much is this going to cost?"

That's a broad generalization, but typically its the focus on time that determines pace. And the value that a particular cultures places on 'productivity' or 'money' plays a huge role. Some high rollers from a major city could look down on a rural place in the South for being lazy or unproductive. The country folk could look down on them for being impatient, rude, or greedy - loving money more than people. I would argue neither person would be correct, they simply have different priorities and values.

Lastly, I think it's very difficult to live for more than a few weeks in a place without adopting it's pace. If you're go-go-go all the time, a slow paced place will drive you crazy. Ditto some friendly guy trying to make friends with everyone he meets on the subway. Both people will be pretty miserable pretty quick until they adapt to how things are done in that location. At least a little. Even if you don't change yourself entirely, you're going to need to change your expectations or you'll be in for a bad time.
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