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Old 12-19-2014, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
11,755 posts, read 8,316,820 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
We keep on hearing this same line over and over, and yet it never comes. How is Germany doing compared to the US?

Here you go:

BBC News - German unemployment rate falls to a record low
On the same page you linked:

Eurozone growth sluggish as Germany avoids recession - BBC News

The German economy shrank by 0.1% last quarter and grew by the same in this quarter.

The U.S. grew by 3.9%
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Old 12-20-2014, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,277,238 times
Reputation: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
We keep on hearing this same line over and over, and yet it never comes. How is Germany doing compared to the US?

Here you go:

BBC News - German unemployment rate falls to a record low
That's one EU country tied to the Euro here is another EU country tied to the Euro with 53.8% Youth Unemployment.

Spain Youth Unemployment Rate | 1986-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar

Also at .10% growth rate I wouldn't be bragging since that is borderline going into recession.

http://www.tradingeconomics.com/germany/gdp-growth

There unemployment rate is also higher than the US unemployment rate as well.
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Old 12-20-2014, 01:08 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
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I think possibly, yes. Europe is poorer than the U.S. and has weaker long-term economic prospects. Under current conditions, no, but probably at some point in the future, perhaps. Probably never huge migration, though. Europe will always be relatively prosperous.

And I'm answering this question strictly in regards to Western Europe. Obviously Eastern Europe is still relatively poor, and still exports much of its educated population to places outside of Eastern Europe, including the U.S.
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Old 12-20-2014, 01:10 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
We keep on hearing this same line over and over, and yet it never comes. How is Germany doing compared to the US?
You realize Germany is currently in a recession, right? And the U.S. has some of the most robust growth in the developed world, right?

Very odd examples to prove your claimed point.
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Old 12-20-2014, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Can't say I disagree with this. Europe has historically been extremely ignorant and arrogant when it comes to the United States before it was even a country. It's not new at all and over time the United States and Europe have drifting further and further away from each other. The "special relationship" between Europe and the United States will continue to fade away over time till nothing is left and we just view each other as nothing but foreigners.
Very true. Despite same roots, esp. with Britons, Europeans and Americans are appareantly tearing apart in cultural terms. The economy will be as much oriented in the Pacific in not so distant future, as it was on Atlantic in 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. So, in addition to cultural terms, the U.S. will shift its economic and politic presence to Pacific.

And if ever one more great immigration is to become about, it will be from Asia, not Europe or South America, according to this altering of importance of oceans.
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Old 12-20-2014, 11:48 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yenisey View Post
Very true. Despite same roots, esp. with Britons, Europeans and Americans are appareantly tearing apart in cultural terms. The economy will be as much oriented in the Pacific in not so distant future, as it was on Atlantic in 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. So, in addition to cultural terms, the U.S. will shift its economic and politic presence to Pacific.

And if ever one more great immigration is to become about, it will be from Asia, not Europe or South America, according to this altering of importance of oceans.
Unlikely scenario. Growth rates in the U.S. Pacific rim are not higher than growth rates in other parts of the U.S., and one need not be on the Pacific Rim to capture Asian immigration or growth in Asian markets.

There are more Asians in the NYC area than in any Pacific Rim city, there are massive Asian industrial investments in the Midwest, etc. And I think Asia has already had its period of rapid expansion. China is slowing down quite a bit.
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Old 12-20-2014, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,378 times
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I was not primarily thinking of Chinese. In fact, I think most immigration will happen, if it will, from India.
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Old 12-20-2014, 12:02 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,260,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yenisey View Post
I was not primarily thinking of Chinese. In fact, I think most immigration will happen, if it will, from India.
Ok, I could see this, but why would the Pacific Rim be the primary beneficiary?

Indians aren't concentrated in the Pacific Rim cities of the U.S. The biggest number, by far, is in the NYC area, and the West Coast cities don't really have bigger Indian immigration than other parts of the U.S.

It seems to me that any Asian economic or immigration surge would have a general benefit to the U.S., rather than concentrating benefits on the West Coast.
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Old 12-20-2014, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Outside of the United States
107 posts, read 118,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Ok, I could see this, but why would the Pacific Rim be the primary beneficiary?

Indians aren't concentrated in the Pacific Rim cities of the U.S. The biggest number, by far, is in the NYC area, and the West Coast cities don't really have bigger Indian immigration than other parts of the U.S.

It seems to me that any Asian economic or immigration surge would have a general benefit to the U.S., rather than concentrating benefits on the West Coast.
You have taken my Pacific word for the Pacific Rim within the U.S. And I had I mind Pacific region as a strategic area, not states that shores Pacific Ocean. Now I undestrand you previous post. I know Asians are in every part of the U.S. I was trying to say that U.S. will benefit immigration from Pacific shoring nations, not to Pacific shoring states within itself.

I also meant more economic activity from U.S. as a whole will be taking place in Pacific area, esp. invests in P.R.C. and India and Indionesia. Offshoring, import, export, as well as selling technology for resources and managing debt. There will be a shift from Atlantic Ocean centered economic activity and foreign policy priorities to Pacific, where India will be more a partner for U.S. than Germany or France in near future.
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Old 12-31-2014, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Trieste
916 posts, read 822,240 times
Reputation: 696
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
We keep on hearing this same line over and over, and yet it never comes. How is Germany doing compared to the US?

Here you go:

BBC News - German unemployment rate falls to a record low
these data are misleading since there are about 8 millions people, that is to say roughly 25% of the total workforce, who live off "minijobs", a kind of jobs that are part time, social utility works etc and that are paid no more than ... 500 per month!

in other words fake jobs
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