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Old 07-08-2015, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
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You can get long shots in at a lot of cities showing thick tree cover, but I don't think that proves anything. Many cities can provide that sort of view. Here's one of Milwaukee from Holy Hill:



ATL isn't a bad choice.
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Old 08-08-2015, 10:32 PM
 
175 posts, read 592,785 times
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yes north carolina is quite good. but in comparsion to some of tampa or coral gables or bala cynwyd its lacking. parts of north carolina can be barren its only in the old colonial historic neighborhoods that have tree coverage. atlanta philly and parts of the floria cities have tree canopy hands down. whoever mentioned seattle and portalnd is an idiot btw
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Old 08-09-2015, 05:03 PM
 
135 posts, read 129,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Having tree covered neighborhoods and actual forested neighborhoods are two different things IMO.

Again, compare Atlanta and Philly for tree coverage and it's not close.

This is what a forest looks like.

Regardless, those are trees, not a forest.

Having a forest within a city is ****ing rare to begin with. Atlanta has a lot of trees, but they don't make a forest.
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Old 08-09-2015, 05:05 PM
 
135 posts, read 129,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ant131531 View Post
Philly core isn't forested at all though. You have to go miles out before you get to a lot of trees in Philly. Come on now. It's too dense. North, South, and central Philly is nothing but concrete.

Pretty sure it was Northwest/West Philadelphia that had the first tree-covered neighborhoods that became the model for all cities afterward, regardless of whether its in the city or not.

Wissahickon, Philadelphia.

http://www.phillywatersheds.org/your...ed/wissahickon

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Old 08-09-2015, 05:15 PM
 
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Never heard of the "Wissahickon Style" I guess, thats been emulated nationwide.
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Old 08-09-2015, 07:03 PM
 
Location: Tualatin Oregon
616 posts, read 505,386 times
Reputation: 400
10 Best Cities for Urban Forests - American ForestsAmerican Forests
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Old 08-09-2015, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,296 posts, read 3,512,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travelingeverywhere View Post
Regardless, those are trees, not a forest.

Having a forest within a city is ****ing rare to begin with. Atlanta has a lot of trees, but they don't make a forest.
No. Atlanta is the definition of a city in a forest. And anyone that has ever been here and actually left the Airport/Downtown can confirm it.

What else would you call a place with many multiples of square miles covered in 200 + feet tall mature trees? Do you have any idea how magnificent and unique this is in an urban environment?
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Old 08-09-2015, 09:29 PM
 
135 posts, read 129,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JMatl View Post
What else would you call a place with many multiples of square miles covered in 200 + feet tall mature trees? Do you have any idea how magnificent and unique this is in an urban environment?
I would call it... most cities, and most cities are separate from forests.
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Old 08-09-2015, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,296 posts, read 3,512,168 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travelingeverywhere View Post
I would call it... most cities, and most cities are separate from forests.
Yes, they are. And Atlanta is not among them, thankfully.
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Old 08-10-2015, 07:21 AM
 
3,784 posts, read 3,006,406 times
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Nasa maps trees of America for the first time and shows forest covers a THIRD of the U.S. | Daily Mail Online

This one is interesting.
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