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Old 12-11-2014, 02:14 PM
 
Location: USA
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They are old cities from the 20th century where no one has the billions of dollars to redevelop yet.
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Old 12-11-2014, 02:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by 11KAP View Post
They are old cities from the 20th century where no one has the billions of dollars to redevelop yet.

Good Lord, every city has areas like this. Such a blanket statement...most Midwest cities have had ongoing development. You should be more careful, than to paint with such a broad brush.

Last edited by NowInWI; 12-11-2014 at 02:38 PM..
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Old 12-11-2014, 03:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
WTF, dude? Seriously? Don't make assumptions based on Google Street View. Visit the Midwest.

Dude, Chicago was built by Irish, Poles, and Black Americans from the South. Same with Detroit. Same with Milwaukee. Same with Cleveland. Minneapolis is Scandinavian.

Indianapolis is German-heavy and the city is decorated with ornate monument everywhere. In terms of monuments, Indianapolis is second only to DC.

The Over-the-Rhine district of Cincinnati, which was obviously built by Germans is full of rowhouses built with character, charm, and attention to detail. It's hardly plain.

Likewise, Germantown in Louisville (while just kinda sorta the Midwest) is busting at the seams with detail and character. You should know. You live there.

What about the art deco skyline of Cleveland? What about grade boulevards of St. Louis and Detroit? The Victorian mansions of St. Paul and Old Louisville? The architectural wonders of Chicago?

What about the Midwest is "affluent but frugal?"
Chicago had numerous German immigrants, and so did the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. And are you seriously suggesting that Milwaukee WASN'T built by German immigrants??? The home of the breweries ( Schlitz, Blatz, Pabst, Old Milwaukee, etc), the sausage makers, the tanneries, the German Socialist movement which controlled Milwaukee's mayordom for 20 years, etc. All you have to do is to check a Milwaukee-area phone book, and look at the last names...

Urban blight is hardly confined to the Midwest, though. Take a look at Philly and Baltimore, which have some of the most decrepit neighborhoods in America.
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Old 12-11-2014, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
Highly highly doubt this.
Last time I was there was in 2008 and that is how it looked.
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Old 12-11-2014, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Untrue. Boston (and Eastern Massachusetts more widely) was a manufacturing center - it was just light manufacturing like textiles, rather than heavy manufacturing. NYC was big on textile manufacturing too. This industry collapsed a lot earlier than heavy industry did (it was already flailing in the 1930s, and in the 50s, when textile plants moved South, it basically died), but there certainly is a major industrial heritage in the region.
Not to the extent of the rust belt. The garment industry before it collapsed in the United States as you pointed out moved South. That's not the same thing as what happened to the Rust Belt which saw a lot of factories close up and operations move over seas. Which explains the differences between Boston and other major cities in the Rust Belt.

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The rust belt is not so much a geographic area as conceptual
Minus Minnesota the rest of the Great Lake states are Rust Belt states along with West Virginia. Maryland, New Jersey, and Delaware are sometimes included but it's primarily the great lake states.

Quote:
I dunno where you were, but while parts of Brooklyn look grimey, there really isn't that much abandonment and vacant lots.
Last time I was there was in 2008 and a lot of the buildings looked like they were going to collapse, there was garbage everywhere, it did remind me of a war zone like in Baghdad and an area just left to rot away like Gary Indiana. Baghdad was worse but Brooklyn still looked horrible.

Last edited by cwa1984; 12-11-2014 at 04:41 PM..
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Old 12-11-2014, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
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Originally Posted by valsteele View Post
A lot of the Puget Sound area looks really run down to me. Tacoma in particular.
I am familiar with the Tacoma area agree. Also, East Portland is quickly becoming the much of the same. Having been a Midwesterner half my life then a PNW dweller for the second half I am now back in the Midwest or as some would call it the Great Lakes area.

I would certainly disagree that "most Midwestern large cities are rundown looking." I would say that only certain parts of many Midwestern cities are rundown looking. Most parts of Midwestern cities are really quite nice in appearance. Maybe the OP has just not been in very many Midwestern neighborhoods.
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Old 12-12-2014, 05:17 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,026,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Not to the extent of the rust belt. The garment industry before it collapsed in the United States as you pointed out moved South. That's not the same thing as what happened to the Rust Belt which saw a lot of factories close up and operations move over seas. Which explains the differences between Boston and other major cities in the Rust Belt.
Why should it make a difference whether the jobs moved to a different part of the country or out of the country? But yes, by jobs and economy %, Boston's economy was never as manufacturating dependent as Rust Belt. To say it was never a manufacturing power isn't true, though.


Quote:
Last time I was there was in 2008 and a lot of the buildings looked like they were going to collapse, there was garbage everywhere, it did remind me of a war zone like in Baghdad and an area just left to rot away like Gary Indiana. Baghdad was worse but Brooklyn still looked horrible.
Where'd you go? I've never seen buildings about to collapse, except for maybe a couple of neglected buildings.
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Old 12-12-2014, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,516,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassVt View Post
Chicago had numerous German immigrants, and so did the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. And are you seriously suggesting that Milwaukee WASN'T built by German immigrants??? The home of the breweries ( Schlitz, Blatz, Pabst, Old Milwaukee, etc), the sausage makers, the tanneries, the German Socialist movement which controlled Milwaukee's mayordom for 20 years, etc. All you have to do is to check a Milwaukee-area phone book, and look at the last names...

Urban blight is hardly confined to the Midwest, though. Take a look at Philly and Baltimore, which have some of the most decrepit neighborhoods in America.
With the exception of the Deep South, there are a lot of German Americans everywhere. But the Great Lakes region, where Irish, Polish, and African Americans out number German Americans, is a lot less German that other places in the Midwest, like Lincoln, Des Moines, and Cincinnati, where German Americans have a strong plurality if not a majority.
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Old 12-12-2014, 05:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
With the exception of the Deep South, there are a lot of German Americans everywhere. But the Great Lakes region, where Irish, Polish, and African Americans out number German Americans is a lot less German that other places in the Midwest, like Lincoln, Des Moines, and Cincinnati, where German Americans have a strong plurality if not a majority.
Cincinnati has a large Black and Irish American population, (as well as Jewish, but no Polish that I know of). The cities demographics are more similar to Great Lakes cities than those west of the Mississippi
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Old 12-12-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,277,768 times
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Why should it make a difference whether the jobs moved to a different part of the country or out of the country? But yes, by jobs and economy %, Boston's economy was never as manufacturating dependent as Rust Belt. To say it was never a manufacturing power isn't true, though.
Because unlike the rust belt the jobs went elsewhere in the country. The manufacturing didn't completely leave the country and go overseas like it did in the rustbelt. That is do to Boston not being as ideal as other locations in the country where as the rust belt situation was do to cheaper competition in foreign countries. With jobs going from one part of this country to another the jobs are still in the United States vs going to a foreign country like what happened with the rust belt.
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