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Old 12-08-2014, 06:37 PM
chh chh started this thread
 
Location: West Michigan
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Are there any large, shrinking metros? What's the largest shrinking metro?
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Aurora, CO
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Detroit and St. Louis are the two best examples of shrinking urban centers. While the suburbs have fared well, both of these cities have lost over half their population in the last 50-60 years.
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Old 12-08-2014, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Here's a list of MSA's (metropolitan statistical areas), population 500,000+, that are losing population.

1) Youngstown, OH (-1.50% growth)
2) Cleveland, OH (-0.60% growth)
3) Toledo, OH (-0.30% growth)
4) Buffalo, NY (-0.12% growth)
5) Syracuse, NY (-0.10% growth)
6) Detroit, MI (-0.03% growth)
7) New Haven, CT (-0.02% growth)
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Old 12-08-2014, 07:09 PM
chh chh started this thread
 
Location: West Michigan
418 posts, read 495,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Here's a list of MSA's (metropolitan statistical areas), population 500,000+, that are losing population.

1) Youngstown, OH (-1.50% growth)
2) Cleveland, OH (-0.60% growth)
3) Toledo, OH (-0.30% growth)
4) Buffalo, NY (-0.12% growth)
5) Syracuse, NY (-0.10% growth)
6) Detroit, MI (-0.03% growth)
7) New Haven, CT (-0.02% growth)
The first 6 I'd say are typical for rust belt cities. The inner city loses alot, the inner ring suburbs lose a little, and the outer ring suburbs and the exurbs gain alot. New Haven CT, however, is a good example though.
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Old 12-09-2014, 07:41 AM
 
56,533 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McdonaldIndy View Post
Are those estimates from 2010-2013?
more realistic indicator is from the 10 year census with actual results
Detroit for example had a -0.35% yearly growth rate from 2000-2010.
Metro Detroit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Yes, they are estimates and you are right about being careful with estimates, as they overestimated population losses in many Northern areas and gains in Southern areas.
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Old 12-09-2014, 08:27 AM
 
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Detroit has stabilized since 2010 and is actually growing again per the 2012 to 2013 release, and is expected to again in 2014 given the number of jobs being created. St. Louis metro never shrunk. Cleveland has basically stopped, shrinking by 14 people last year. The largest metro to shrink last year was Pittsburgh, going down by less than 150 people though.

From 2012 to 2013, the current biggest losers by number of people lost are:

Clarksville, TN
Flint, MI
Montgomery, AL
Sierra Vista, AZ
Tallahassee, FL
Scranton, OH
Farmington, NM
Valdosta, GA

The largest losers as a % of total population:

Sierra Vista, AZ
Farmington, NM
Lawton, OK
Valdosta, GA
Waterton, NY
Hinesville, GA
Carson City, NV
Albany, GA
Clarksville, TN
East Stroudsburg, PA
Shreveport, LA
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Old 12-09-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chh View Post
The first 6 I'd say are typical for rust belt cities. The inner city loses alot, the inner ring suburbs lose a little, and the outer ring suburbs and the exurbs gain alot. New Haven CT, however, is a good example though.
New Haven itself is gaining in population, albeit by a slow rate. It's the suburbs surrounding it that are seeing slight decline.

The issue in Connecticut overall is mostly one of cost. It's become a very expensive area to live and buy a home. Therefore many suburbs (including some of the wealthiest) have seen their average age drift upward, as kids move out after high school, young parents can't afford to relocate there, and empty nesters stay in their homes as long as feasible.
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Old 12-09-2014, 09:46 AM
 
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New Haven also is not a large metro land wise. If you work in New Haven and live in the suburbs you might be considered in the Hartford or Bridgeport metro.
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Austin
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Pittsburgh has slowly lost population for the past five censuses. Estimates since 2010 show it now slowly gaining.

Past population figures here: Pittsburgh metropolitan area - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-09-2014, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and wherever planes fly
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Richmond Virginia while not a huge city is another place that lost significant population from the 1970's at a height of 249,000 until just the last few years and now is slowly growing again. The suburbs have continued to grow it seems
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