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View Poll Results: Do you think New England feels claustrophobic?
Yes 35 29.17%
No 85 70.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-16-2017, 10:20 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post


nei has yet to post his source after being asked, might I add.
Source what? I didn't claim 85% was correct, it was in response to "you're making it out that it's 99% tree canopy"; 85% is my perception from my experience. The forested numbers people have posted is contigous timberland not tree canopy, they're not quite the same. I'm not sure why you think I'm boosting New England by claiming high tree cover; wasn't the OP presenting that as a negative?

Massachusetts isn't heavily forested seems off. What else the state? It's certainly not farmed. Check a satellite map,

Quote:
Also, another point I want to make is the climate difference. Boston fall foliage happens the same ****ing time New York and Philadelphia does. The coasts for Mid-Atlantic and New England are pretty much the same while interior/Upper New England and Upstate NY are more closely related.
much of Massachusetts is not on the coast but is in the interior. Fall foliage time past 20 miles from the coast is the same as most of upstate NY besides the Adirondacks.
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Old 06-16-2017, 10:22 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
Uh, he posted them earlier in the thread. You need to actually read the thread.

I also know from personal experience that MA, CT and RI are not heavily forested states. Any sort of data is secondary, and I was extremely skeptical of nei's numbers. 55% treed in the state I come from? You can **** right off with that. No way in hell. I've been to them plenty. The Adirondacks are more comparable to Northern New England. The rest of the state is more comparable to Southern. Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine are the real gems of New England. It's not the whole package. Stop acting like Northern New England and Southern New England are similar, because they're not.
The Adirondacks are much less populated than Vermont, I'd find them rather different. Massachusetts south of Vermont is mostly forested except in parts of the Connecticut River valley. Your map has over 1/3 of Massachusetts in the same grouping as the Adirondacks...
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Old 06-16-2017, 10:29 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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check satellite view on google maps:

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.5076.../data=!3m1!1e3

turn labels off, while NY state is majority forest, there are large sections that are farmed. Not as true for Massachusetts. The drastic difference between Vermont & New Hampshire / Massachusetts is NOT visible on the map
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Old 06-16-2017, 10:45 PM
 
Location: South Park, San Diego
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I can see that. I love New England but it is often dense and forested, provincial even more than the Midwest and because of that not all that welcoming to outsiders. If you've got a local angle you are generally in but for the rest of us you will never be able to fully explore its nuances and intricacies.
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Old 06-16-2017, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
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We were just up there for six days over the Holiday weekend and spent time in Maine, New Hampshire and Mass. We met nothing but friendly people everywhere, you just have to engage them.

I haven't been in a couple of years, but I fell in love with New England all over again. I wouldn't call it claustrophobic at all, I consider it 'cozy.'
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Old 06-17-2017, 12:40 AM
 
Location: Near L.A.
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I've never been to New England, so I can't say.

I can say that the Southeast, Midwest and Great Plans can feel quite claustrophobic culturally and psychologically, at least in many areas.
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Old 06-17-2017, 08:42 AM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,538,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
I also know from personal experience that MA, CT and RI are not heavily forested states. Any sort of data is secondary, and I was extremely skeptical of nei's numbers. 55% treed in the state I come from? You can **** right off with that. No way in hell. I've been to them plenty. The Adirondacks are more comparable to Northern New England. The rest of the state is more comparable to Southern. Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine are the real gems of New England. It's not the whole package. Stop acting like Northern New England and Southern New England are similar, because they're not.
I've lived in Downstate New York and I've lived in Southern New England, and there is no question in my mind that Southern New England is more heavily forested than Downstate New York by an enormous factor. Of course Southern New England and Northern New England are different. Southern anywhere and northern anywhere are different. They also have definite similarities. New England is a cohesive region that has existed for many years. If I tell you that people all over New England root for the Patriots and the Red Sox, how will you try to argue that that isn't true? I look forward to hearing it. Maybe you'll point to people in Northern Vermont who still hold a torch for the Montreal Expos?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
New England is overrated as ****. People (especially natives) act like it's the only place with fall foliage, forestry, history and beaches, when in actuality, it's no different, or better or worse than anywhere else.
I'm not originally from New England, have lived elsewhere for 90 percent of my life, and have always been fascinated and charmed by it. Always. Since I was a very small child, since before I can remember. I liked going on trips to Upstate New York, too, but something about New England always grabbed me. It's hard to quantify. It's the trees, it's the winding roads, it's the signs every Massachusetts town has when you enter it, it's the distinctive old architecture, it's the ocean, it's the lakes, it's the country stores, it's the charming villages, it's the character-filled small cities, it's the palpable feel of history, it's the independent spirit, it's the small businesses, it's the maple syrup, it's the green mountains, it's the islands, it's the sailing culture, it's the preppies, it's the ski lodges, it's the rural progressive attitudes that it's hard to find anywhere else. Almost none of that is found exclusively in New England, but all of it together isn't found in exactly the same recipe as it is in New England. And whatever it is about that recipe was always appealing to me, and it was always appealing to others.

I was always jealous of New England. When, in elementary school, we learned about the regions of the country and I learned that my native New York wasn't part of New England, I got sad and tried to deny it for a while. I liked the images that New England evoked and I wanted to be part of it. Now I live here and a little part of me feels happy about it almost every single day.

I have a very, very good feeling that the same jealousy I felt about not being in New England is the jealousy that motivates your hate; I'm generally strongly turned off by "you're just jealous" arguments, but sometimes it's true. I don't think you're necessary jealous of what New England has; I think you're jealous of the attention it gets. But you don't have to let jealousy turn to hate. I don't and I never have. Think of all the minutes and hours you've wasted here typing screeds against New England that could have been used looking at pretty pictures or building model ships or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
The difference is, it's elitist as ****. Look at the income inequality and racism Boston is known for. Nose up in the air. The nightlife is average, the climate is awful, it's not welcoming to outsiders, the food is nothing special, etc. I can go on.
Most good places are a little elitist. Income inequality and racism are bad, but this is America, income inequality and racism are what we do. Where I grew up in New York, a bunch of rich people kept a black family out of their 56-home gated community because they were worried that black people buying one of the million-dollar houses with a security guard and a private beach would tank the property values. This happened barely more than 10 years ago. I don't care about nightlife and never have and frankly few people I know over the age of 30 do. I'm an outsider and it's been very welcoming to me. The food is sometimes average and sometimes excellent (I'm looking at you, Vermont) depending on where you are. I can't argue with you about the climate, it sucks. However, if the roles were reversed, you'd argue with me about the climate, because you can't admit any positives when you're arguing against a point, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
I don't understand the constant propping up of a place so incredibly average. Modesty is not a trait of New England, and it's also rooted in their holier than thou Puritan roots.
The amazing thing about this statement is that modesty is one of the most stereotypical traits of both New England and Puritans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
I've been blown away by the beauty of states like Washington and Oregon, the cosmopolitan culture of New York, the size of Los Angeles, the climate of Hawaii, the food of Philadelphia or New Orleans, and the skyscrapers of Chicago.
Washington is a lot like New England, actually. I had a visitor from Seattle last year who was on a six-state tour of New England (I've had three different friends who did that tour) and made that same observation. By the way, you and I agree on all your observations on those other places, except that I've never been to Oregon or Hawaii. We're not so different, you and me! You also hate Trump, right? We should have lunch or something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
New England is no different than the rest of the Northeast. Is Mount Washington gold plated or something? Even from a sports perspective, the fairweather nature of the sports fans is irritating.
Every place in the Northeast is somewhat different from every other place in the Northeast. This is going to sound totally obnoxious and I apologize in advance, but I personally am way, way beyond the point in my life where the various proclivities of sports fans are important to me. Since moving to New England, I've been occasionally amused by the fact that people worship the Patriots, who are the obvious bad guys, but it's not any more than amusing to me. I have way bigger priorities than to get even remotely upset over such things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
New York has the Statue of Liberty. Philadelphia has the Liberty Bell. Seattle has the Space Needle. San Francisco has the Golden Gate Bridge. Los Angeles has the Hollywood Sign. St. Louis has the Gateway Arch. Washington has the Washington Monument. Boston has... the Citgo sign[i].
You are correct that Boston lacks an obvious icon like most of its peer cities have, but that's like No. 87 on my list of important things about a city. You really think St. Louis is a better city than Boston because of the Gateway Arch?
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Old 06-17-2017, 08:50 PM
 
Location: NYntarctica
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Why ?
More walkability and a bigger economy
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Old 06-18-2017, 05:30 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
More walkability and a bigger economy
Connecticut's Cost-Of-Living and taxes are already pretty high. Extending the Bronx density up into Connecticut would raise the COL and taxes of Connecticut.
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Old 06-18-2017, 08:10 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warszawa View Post
More walkability and a bigger economy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Connecticut's Cost-Of-Living and taxes are already pretty high. Extending the Bronx density up into Connecticut would raise the COL and taxes of Connecticut.
I am glad someone brought up the Bronx on a thread about feeling claustrophobic. The Bronx makes New England look wide open in comparison. Nothing like being trapped on the Cross Bronx Expressway or on the Major Deegan surrounded by apartment buildings to make one feel claustrophobic.

As for more walkability and a bigger economy, the Bronx has the lowest per capita income of all of New York's 62 counties. The lowest, lower then even rural counties Upstate. And as for walkability, the Hudson Valley, Connecticut, New Jersey and Long Island is filled with former Bronx residents who walked right out of the Bronx as soon as they were able too!

Far from spreading Bronx type development to other locations, The Bronx would be a better place if it had less density, not more.
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