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View Poll Results: Do you think New England feels claustrophobic?
Yes 35 29.17%
No 85 70.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 04-07-2016, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,721 posts, read 7,676,702 times
Reputation: 7626

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Parts of Boston feel way too cramped and I do wish that I could escape it on weekends. I agree that the options for this aren't nearly as satisfying as in other metro areas.

But all things considered, I'd take Boston over Sprawltown, USA. Every time.
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Old 04-07-2016, 03:18 PM
 
3,573 posts, read 1,523,767 times
Reputation: 3022
My in-laws live on Cape Cod and a few live in western suburbs of Boston, so we've visited a lot. I've never felt claustrophobic.
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Old 04-07-2016, 10:03 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,565,731 times
Reputation: 2194
I dont understand the boston posts , route 128 and boston is total sprawl. I acrtually love th drive, like the jonathan richman song. very cool region to drive in

Roadrunner, roadrunner
Going faster miles an hour
Gonna drive past the Stop & Shop
With the radio on

I'm in love with Massachusetts
And the neon when it's cold outside
And the highway when it's late at night
Got the radio on
I'm like the roadrunner

All right
I'm in love with modern moonlight
128 when it's dark outside
I'm in love with Massachusetts
I'm in love with the radio on

It helps me from being alone late at night
It helps me from being lonely late at night
I don't feel so bad now in the car
Don't feel so alone, got the radio on
Like the roadrunner, that's right

Said welcome to the spirit of 1956
Patient in the bushes next to '57
The highway is your girlfriend as you go by quick
Suburban trees, suburban speed
And it smells like heaven

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Old 04-07-2016, 10:04 PM
 
3,618 posts, read 1,565,731 times
Reputation: 2194
I dont understand the boston posts , route 128 and boston is total sprawl. I acrtually love th drive, like the jonathan richman song. very cool region to drive in

Roadrunner, roadrunner
Going faster miles an hour
Gonna drive past the Stop & Shop
With the radio on

I'm in love with Massachusetts
And the neon when it's cold outside
And the highway when it's late at night
Got the radio on
I'm like the roadrunner

All right
I'm in love with modern moonlight
128 when it's dark outside
I'm in love with Massachusetts
I'm in love with the radio on

It helps me from being alone late at night
It helps me from being lonely late at night
I don't feel so bad now in the car
Don't feel so alone, got the radio on
Like the roadrunner, that's right

Said welcome to the spirit of 1956
Patient in the bushes next to '57
The highway is your girlfriend as you go by quick
Suburban trees, suburban speed
And it smells like heaven


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy88-5pc7c8
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Old 04-08-2016, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63320
I didn't vote but I want to put in my two cents' worth.

I used to live on the east coast (not in New England but in the Chesapeake Bay region). I lived there for about 12 years of my life. But now I've lived in Texas for the past 25 years.

I didn't realize how acclimated to the "big, Texas sky" or the spread out feel and sweeping vistas of Texas till I went back to visit the East Coast. Wow, it's so much more hilly. There are so many more trees! So many more buildings. So many more people per square mile! Yes, I admit that I initially feel sort of claustrophobic till I get my bearings when I go back to the east coast and when I come back home to Texas and see that huge, blue Texas sky above me I literally breathe easier at first.

I don't mean that in a negative way. I just mean that it's an adjustment mentally and takes a day or so.
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Old 04-08-2016, 06:55 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,145,910 times
Reputation: 63320
nei, those photos are beautiful, and like I said, I don't think negatively of the east coast - it just does feel more crowded - with trees, hills, buildings, and people - than Texas. Even the beautiful rural parts feel more crowded (you mentioned the trees). For comparison, here are a few pictures of rural Texas.
Attached Thumbnails
New England feels claustrophobic?-frio-country-road.jpg   New England feels claustrophobic?-frio-sunset.jpg   New England feels claustrophobic?-frio-vista.jpg  
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Old 04-08-2016, 06:59 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,972 posts, read 12,484,422 times
Reputation: 8712
I'm from SE Mass where Mass and RI meet. I think that area as well as the rest of eastern Mass is claustrophobic. Other than that maybe parts of Central Mass feel that way. As you go up into Northern NE I don't get that crowded feeling. I live in Florida now and I feel claustrophobic here. Between all the people that live here, and all the tourists pouring in, it can be overwhelming. Actually I find much of the East Coast is claustrophobic, compared to other areas of the country.
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Old 04-08-2016, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,679 posts, read 49,437,227 times
Reputation: 19129
'Big Sky' country. I get it now. Yes you are correct. I had not thought of it in that context.

The arid grassland plains that were once labeled the 'Great American Desert' by colonialists [later re-named the Great Plains] can support few trees. A person can see from horizon to horizon, thus the big sky effect.

Where I live now is dense lush forest. If you go down into the Southern New England cities the forest is quickly replaced by tall buildings. If you leave the downtown areas and go into residential areas the area between houses and in backyards is still trees. To keep an area free from trees, they must be cut down periodically [or else you pave over the area]. The ground does not dry-out every year, so nature constantly tries to replace her forests.

I can understand, how a person would become accustomed to 'big sky' the sense of openness. So walking under a forest canopy might feel confining.

I totally agree with the claustrophobia of the cities. Even cities like Dallas would give you that. I served 20-years in the US Navy most of which was on subs and I can't stand the high population-density of cities.

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Old 04-08-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
I live in a very wide open state. But I don't consider New England or adjacent areas of New York or Pennsyvania to be claustrophobic unless right in the center of the region's densest cities.

Even around New York City (yes I know it is not New England, but in New Mexico I have driven further for a hamburger than the distance from Fairfield county to Cape May, NJ) you only have to drive about a half an hour to 45 minutes before the suburbs start really spreading out and then you are in rugged country dotted with quaint villages surrounded by vast forested expanses.
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Old 04-21-2016, 06:09 PM
 
8 posts, read 7,363 times
Reputation: 31
I registered to this website specifically to answer this question. I live in Northern New England but am originally from rural northern California. I googled "New England Claustrophobic" today and this thread came up. Obviously, I do agree with OP that New England has a special cramped feeling to it, at least from the perspective of this westerner. Even up in rural NH I feel it-the tightly packed trees, roads, very few mountain vistas (unless you want a hike) and NO farms, aside from the occasional small farms in Vermont.

What's frustrating is I should like New England-it's historic, beautiful, good economy but the 'cramped' factor has bothered me more and more the longer I'm living here. I'm chalking it up to irreconcilable differences-New England natives tend to find their home environment cozy or comforting. I can see and appreciate that, but man, I miss being able to see to a horizon over gently rolling farms or desertscapes with soaring mountains in the distance. My favorite spot in New England is the Champlain valley because you get a semblance of farm country and pretty mountains in the distance.

To answer the OPs question, yes, it has become a big factor for me. I've turned down jobs in Boston (waaay more claustrophobic down there!) to set my sights on eventually returning west.
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