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View Poll Results: Do you think New England feels claustrophobic?
Yes 35 29.17%
No 85 70.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 04-21-2016, 08:30 PM
 
Location: IN
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No, not at all. If you want "views" of mountains you need to get outside a bit on trails. The natural environment is woods in most of New Englan, when cleared for pasture (many areas were grazed by sheep in the 1800s)- filled in with woods again after they were abandoned 50-75 years later. There are plenty of poorly educated people who clear land for "views" that don't have any concept of managing a woodlot for wildlife and high quality trees for timber. I don't like open areas because I dislike the harsh intensity of the sun in areas with less dense foliage- generally too dry in terms of climate as well.
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Old 06-10-2017, 07:32 AM
 
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I live in New England and I don't consider it claustrophobic, in general. There are definitely big and small urban pockets that feel claustrophobic like Boston MA, Lowell MA, Manchester NH and Portland ME but overall the parts I inhabit on a day to day basis are far from claustrophobic.

For what it is worth I rarely visit CT so the OP could be spot on in his assessment if he is basing his opinions of New England on just his experiences in Connecticut. One year ago I was a passenger on a business road trip to New Jersey and although I did not have to drive at all I still have nightmares about that ride through Connecticut. That area south and west of Hartford sends chills down my spine.
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Old 06-10-2017, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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On a lot of New England secondary roads you will see homes scattered a half-mile to a mile apart from one another. This does not make me feel enclosed.

Maybe if the road is all under the forest canopy, then I guess I could see someone getting that feel from New England.
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Old 06-10-2017, 12:39 PM
 
115 posts, read 57,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
Not to me. Then again Im from Philly where we have blocks like this
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9409...mOqQ!2e0?hl=en

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Old 06-10-2017, 12:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FarHorizons View Post
I registered to this website specifically to answer this question. I live in Northern New England but am originally from rural northern California. I googled "New England Claustrophobic" today and this thread came up. Obviously, I do agree with OP that New England has a special cramped feeling to it, at least from the perspective of this westerner. Even up in rural NH I feel it-the tightly packed trees, roads, very few mountain vistas (unless you want a hike) and NO farms, aside from the occasional small farms in Vermont.

What's frustrating is I should like New England-it's historic, beautiful, good economy but the 'cramped' factor has bothered me more and more the longer I'm living here. I'm chalking it up to irreconcilable differences-New England natives tend to find their home environment cozy or comforting. I can see and appreciate that, but man, I miss being able to see to a horizon over gently rolling farms or desertscapes with soaring mountains in the distance. My favorite spot in New England is the Champlain valley because you get a semblance of farm country and pretty mountains in the distance.

To answer the OPs question, yes, it has become a big factor for me. I've turned down jobs in Boston (waaay more claustrophobic down there!) to set my sights on eventually returning west.

For the record, you do know that there is the same history and beauty elsewhere in the Northeast/East Coast, right?

New York (since you mentioned the Champlain Valley). New Jersey. Pennsylvania. Virginia.
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Old 06-10-2017, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
For the record, you do know that there is the same history and beauty elsewhere in the Northeast/East Coast, right?

New York (since you mentioned the Champlain Valley). New Jersey. Pennsylvania. Virginia.
This is true. NY and PA in particular offer that sweeping view you are after in droves. Hills/mountains/farmland.

Virginia too has a lot of "open mountain" scenery. Shenandoah valley!

I personally have a hard time believing that all of New England is that bad though. I imagine Maine has a lot of open wilderness and I have seen photos of beautiful homesteads in Vermont and New Hampshire.
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Old 06-10-2017, 05:24 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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New England is very forested even compared to upstate ny, so open views are scarce, though you can still find sweeping views but you have to know where to go.

Vermont is better than Maine or New Hampshire in the sense of more farmed and open. Still, you can see sweeping vistas of mountains easily in the Whites of NH
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Old 06-11-2017, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
nei, those photos are beautiful, and like I said, I don't think negatively of the east coast - it just does feel more crowded - with trees, hills, buildings, and people - than Texas. Even the beautiful rural parts feel more crowded (you mentioned the trees). For comparison, here are a few pictures of rural Texas.

Where is that first one taken? It looks like the area around Ballinger, TX.
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Old 06-11-2017, 05:41 PM
 
Location: USA
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It's only the area from Boston to Southwest CT that seem overcrowded. Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts are the most densely populated states in the country. It's only a matter of time until the South catches up. NE has very slow population growth in every place except Boston.
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Old 06-11-2017, 07:43 PM
 
115 posts, read 57,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
New England is very forested even compared to upstate ny, so open views are scarce, though you can still find sweeping views but you have to know where to go.

Vermont is better than Maine or New Hampshire in the sense of more farmed and open. Still, you can see sweeping vistas of mountains easily in the Whites of NH

Not sure what you mean by this. The only heavily forested states are Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.
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