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View Poll Results: Do you think New England feels claustrophobic?
Yes 35 29.17%
No 85 70.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-11-2017, 08:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
Not sure what you mean by this. The only heavily forested states are Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine.
This map shows that all of New England is heavily forested:

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Old 06-11-2017, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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I am sure it was mentioned upthread (hell, I might have mentioned it) but New England was cruddy land to farm in with stony soils - in large part due to the ice ages repeatedly scraping off the region's topsoil and depositing it in Long Island. As a result, as soon as the western frontier opened up in the early 19th century those who wanted to farm moved west, and most of the land (outside of fertile regions like the Connecticut River valley) was essentially returned to nature as second-growth forest. This is painfully clear to anyone who spends time hiking in the woods in New England, as you will invariably eventually find remnants of either an old stone wall or an abandoned house foundation.
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Old 06-12-2017, 08:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boulevardofdef View Post
This map shows that all of New England is heavily forested:

Yes, for a very specific type of biomass, which doesn't tell the whole story.

CT, MA and RI are literally no different than most of NJ.
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Old 06-12-2017, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I am sure it was mentioned upthread (hell, I might have mentioned it) but New England was cruddy land to farm in with stony soils -
Seasonal freezing 'heaves' stones in the soil up toward the surface. So every year we have a fresh crop of rocks.

Lack of seasonal droughts [which are so common in most of the continant] means that we have lush vegetation year -round.

Lack of cyclic droughts mean that perennials do not die off every 4 to 8 years. They thrive.



I have trails on my land that need to b e bush-hogged every 3 to 4 years to keep the forest from swallowing them.

In New England, any pasture or clearing will see trees encroaching every year from the treeline. It takes a lot of work to clear a field. Then every year it takes more work to maintain that field cleared.
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Old 06-12-2017, 10:17 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GarbanzoBeans View Post
Yes, for a very specific type of biomass, which doesn't tell the whole story.

CT, MA and RI are literally no different than most of NJ.
I was comparing MA with upstate NY not NJ; the forest cover difference is obvious
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Old 06-12-2017, 10:38 PM
 
681 posts, read 434,820 times
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the traffic between Hartford and anywhere going southwest on 84 has simply reached NIGHTMARE LEVELS.

i travel through Connecticut after 9pm only.... and unfortunately, often.

a typical thursday or friday, an hour or so after noon in the warm months driving up from the Tappan Zee, i can cruise 287 coming up from i-81 and 78, or from i-80 and the Delaware River Gap... the minute you hit 684, it can be 4-6 hours getting up to, past, and through the peak traffic of Hartford.

It's TOTALLY INSANE.


get up to Mass, NH, Maine, etc, it's much better... even when you factor in the Boston and RT128 traffic.
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Old 06-12-2017, 10:57 PM
 
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Everything you're envying sounds like a nightmare, wide open freeways? Are you serious?

The compact towns of New England are walkable and transit friendly, that is a MASSIVE advantage compared to the rest of the country.

Part of me thinks this might be an elaborate troll post.
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Old 06-13-2017, 11:25 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I was comparing MA with upstate NY not NJ; the forest cover difference is obvious
Massachussets has 60% forest cover (3 million acres : UMass Amherst) to New York's 63% (19 million acres : NYS DEC)

When you travel due west from the Berkshires, you are traveling from the most densely forested part of Massachussets into the Hudson/Mohawk confluence and then onto the Finger Lakes region which are indeed the least forested and most farmed part of NYS. So the contrast would seem great.
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Old 06-13-2017, 11:31 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Massachussets has 60% forest cover (3 million acres : UMass Amherst) to New York's 63% (19 million acres : NYS DEC)
hmm... I live in the western part of the state which is less developed. Definitely more forested and less farmland mixed in the hills than much of upstate NY (thinking of Finger Lakes & southern Tier). Endless forest, taken by in the hills west of the Connecticut River valley. Also, sometimes forestland refers to only "useful for timber". A lot of central and eastern MA is tree covered but the land is large lot residential with some conservation land mixed in that would uneconomical for timber production.

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Old 06-13-2017, 01:30 PM
 
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The Adirondacks are larger than Vermont and New Hampshire. Whats your point?

Cherry picking a region within Upstate NY that has marginally less forestry than all of Massachusetts?

Southern New England is literally no different than New Jersey.

Northern New England is pretty different to Southern, which is more similar to the Adirondacks.
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