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Old 12-13-2014, 07:23 PM
 
12,651 posts, read 10,492,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vlajos View Post
Walmart has no control over most big northern cities.
Yeah, definitely not.

Wal-Mart convenience stores? Never heard of em.
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Old 12-13-2014, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,287 posts, read 3,505,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Yeah, definitely not.

Wal-Mart convenience stores? Never heard of em.

I've never heard of the convenience stores either, but we had the unfortunate experience of visiting our first Wal-Mart neighborhood market in Orlando a few weeks ago.

it was near our hotel after we couldn't find the Publix that we were directed to, but it was pretty sad. The employees were obviously miserable, and we were basically treated like crap at check-out. The store was fairly new, but looked like crap too. It felt like a dumpy warehouse with bright lights.

There were about 10-12 employees hanging out by the front door, smoking and bitching about how much they hated the customers and working there.

Thankfully, these neighborhood markets haven't invaded Atlanta yet. Publix & Kroger pretty much have it on lockdown close to and within the City.

As far as 'real' Wal-Marts go, we have 2 in the City presently. One of them is pretty urban, on the ground floor of a big mixed-use development. The other is a redevelopment and expansion of a former Publix right next to Downtown that didn't work out. This one serves a huge food desert, so I give it a pass.

Inside the I-285 Perimeter (we don't call it the Beltway here) there are 5 Wal-Marts in total. The one nearest to me actually isn't too bad design-wise. They have underground parking, and have wrapped the ground level parking lot with 2-3 story buildings fronting the sidewalk and screening most of the parking.

In the suburbs though, they are EVERYWHERE. Sadly this has to be one of their largest markets, overall.

The bottom line though is that there are a lot more Targets in urban Atlanta, and they have no aversion to building urban here.
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Old 12-13-2014, 08:13 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steel03 View Post
^Please refer to my lengthy post re: Walmarts and Targets in the Twin Cities. There is a Walmart about a quarter mile north of the northernwestern tip of Minneapolis in Brooklyn Center, and another one about a quarter mile east of the northeastern tip of Minneapolis in St. Anthony. Neither has a Minneapolis mailing address, they probably just share zip codes with the city.

I don't think anyone is trying to argue that Walmart has no presence in the Twin Cities, but the pattern on the first few pages of this thread was people discussing Walmart locations within city limits. The more interesting point is that there are more than twice as many Target locations in the Twin Cities than Walmart locations.
Shocking. And to think Target is HQd in Minneapolis!
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Old 12-13-2014, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,275,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.J240 View Post
Probably because it kills local independent shops. Not my opinion, just what I hear.
They've been dying off for years due to their inability to compete. No one shops on "main street" anymore in most towns. Towns that block walmart and other box stores from coming in because "it will hurt local business" already have residents in those towns just commuting 20 miles or however far to go buy whatever they need at walmart or another big box store. The whole protecting independent local shops is actually not working since they have been going out of business for decades in the United States and what killed them off wasn't just walmart but sears, jcpenny, etc. combined.
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Old 12-14-2014, 11:17 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,431,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
They've been doing small urban stores in Chicago for 4 years now too. 15,000sf Express stores and 30,000sf Neighborhood Market stores. At least they keep them small. I stopped in once in Lakeview just to look, and apparently there's another urban store near my job in the loop, but I'm much more partial to Target.

They've been opening those new "urban Targets" around here as well. There's one about a 5 minute walk from my condo. It fits nicely with the streetscape and has the usual underground parking and muti-floor layout.

http://loyolastudentdispatch.files.w...ize3502331.jpg

They opened another urban footprint Target right on the site of the former Cabrini Green housing complex that was torn down and is being replaced with market-rate highrises, mid-rise condo buildings and lots of retail.

I believe they mean with apartments above it. Are there apartments above the one in Chicago?
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Old 12-14-2014, 11:18 PM
 
9,838 posts, read 11,431,986 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't think so. There is a Walmart in Denver in the Stapleton New Urbanist development. I can't find a source for when it opened, but I believe it's been around a little while.

Are there apartments above it? I believe that is what they meant.
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Old 12-15-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
They've been dying off for years due to their inability to compete. No one shops on "main street" anymore in most towns. Towns that block walmart and other box stores from coming in because "it will hurt local business" already have residents in those towns just commuting 20 miles or however far to go buy whatever they need at walmart or another big box store. The whole protecting independent local shops is actually not working since they have been going out of business for decades in the United States and what killed them off wasn't just walmart but sears, jcpenny, etc. combined.
Not true, I've seen this happen in many smaller cities that until that time had active downtowns; I've seen small cities fight Wal-Mart and maintain/build on their downtowns. It happens, period. It's basic Economics - you need to study what Wal-Mart actually does, why it works for them, and the aftermath of these practices.
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Old 12-15-2014, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,275,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Not true, I've seen this happen in many smaller cities that until that time had active downtowns; I've seen small cities fight Wal-Mart and maintain/build on their downtowns. It happens, period. It's basic Economics - you need to study what Wal-Mart actually does, why it works for them, and the aftermath of these practices.
I'll repeat myself again since you didn't pay attention the first time. I said "towns" not "cities". The second biggest town in a bed in county that I live in fought to keep a walmart out of the town because it would "hurt local business". Problem is there is no real local business on main street in that town...except a jc penny catalog store, pizza shop, a craft store, and one hardware store that went out of business twice. Everything else is closed down or wouldn't be effected by walmart moving in like the real estate agency, law office, and accountant's office. People in that town and elsewhere in the county and the next county up since that is even more isolated instead have to commute 20 miles or more to go to a box store like walmart or target because there is nothing around. Getting a walmart put in that town would've saved people losing 1.5 to 2 hours of there day just commuting back and forth and wasting gas money.
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Old 12-15-2014, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,878 times
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Wrong. You said "no one shops on 'main street' anymore," which is completely untrue. The town I grew up in (Sturgeon Bay) still has its downtown intact. I grew up shopping on 3rd, and my relatives are still doing it. Or Cedarburg, WI. Packed on weekends. Or my current neighborhood in Milwaukee, Bayview, which used to be its own city with its own downtown and is now a part of Milwaukee with its own bustling neighborhood downtown. Wal-Mart is a detriment to downtowns, period. I've seen it personally. I've been to Bentonville; I've worked with the corporate office; I know many people who live there in the bubble as buyers for 3rd parties trying to break in or maintain relationships with the corporate offices. It's cutthroat. You are unaware of pre-Wal-Mart and post-Wal-Mart landscapes in small town America, which are night and day. Perhaps you are too young to remember? Too inexperienced with the ways of the world/business practices? Too brainwashed by the usual propoganda? Because Wal-Mart is bad for local business. Period.
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Old 12-15-2014, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,275,413 times
Reputation: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Wrong. You said "no one shops on 'main street' anymore," which is completely untrue.
No one shops on "main street" anymore in most towns

Please pay better attention next time.

Quote:
Wal-Mart is a detriment to downtowns, period. I've seen it personally.
Your word isn't good enough for me.

Quote:
I've been to Bentonville; I've worked with the corporate office; I know many people who live there in the bubble as buyers for 3rd parties trying to break in or maintain relationships with the corporate offices. It's cutthroat.
When has business not been cutthroat?

Quote:
You are unaware of pre-Wal-Mart and post-Wal-Mart landscapes in small town America, which are night and day.
In small town America there is hardly anything there that is why it's called "small town" America.

Quote:
Perhaps you are too young to remember?
Your right I'm to young to remember the 1950s since I wasn't born yet.

Quote:
Too inexperienced with the ways of the world/business practices? Too brainwashed by the usual propoganda? Because Wal-Mart is bad for local business. Period.
You've just preached without backing your claims at all. How did you address anything I put in my previous post about a small town having nothing in it and everyone having to commute 20 miles or more to buy things at a big box store.
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