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Old 12-15-2014, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,405,848 times
Reputation: 2896

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If there's "nothing" downtown, Wal-Mart can't destroy it; unfortunately for your assertion, there are and have been many, many, many downtowns that have plenty of long-time local businesses. Wal-Mart destroys these businesses, and then the cities have exactly what you seem to want, nothing downtown and giant dollar store shed with Chinese projects that break. Small towns are what Wal-Mart targets and dominates. Obviously they're not going to take over shopping in New York City, the hell are you going on about?? The future is going to be more unique, local and specialized offerings, not the opposite. Wal-Mart had its peak impact already.

So go buy their horrible products (cheap/foreign/perform poorly/break easily) from their depressed/poverty-stricken employees who are kept just under full-time hours (protection from collecting benefits) in a town with no competition (see: not capitalism) and a lack of entrepreneurial spirit (why bother?), and leave the rest of us who want to see competitive markets (always best for the consumer) with a wide array of products (best for the consumer) in a city with unique stores/services where people can make over minimum wage and support their families instead of 31 hours a week and no bennies.
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Old 12-15-2014, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,278,649 times
Reputation: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
If there's "nothing" downtown, Wal-Mart can't destroy it; unfortunately for your assertion, there are and have been many, many, many downtowns that have plenty of long-time local businesses.
Such as a craft store in a small town? A local hardware store that usually goes out of business and gets replaced by an ames hardware store?

Quote:
Wal-Mart destroys these businesses, and then the cities have exactly what you seem to want,
Wow you don't pay attention at all because I'm talking about "towns" specifically "small towns" not "cities". I don't know why you keep bringing cities up in your replies to me because I didn't mention cities.

Quote:
Small towns are what Wal-Mart targets and dominates.
Because there is nothing there.

Quote:
Obviously they're not going to take over shopping in New York City, the hell are you going on about??
Nothing I didn't say **** about NYC that is you imagining things.

Quote:
The future is going to be more unique, local and specialized offerings, not the opposite. Wal-Mart had its peak impact already.
So why are you going on and on complaining then?

Quote:
So go buy their horrible products (cheap/foreign/perform poorly/break easily) from their depressed/poverty-stricken employees who are kept just under full-time hours (protection from collecting benefits) in a town with no competition (see: not capitalism)
Enough preaching.

Quote:
and a lack of entrepreneurial spirit (why bother?), and leave the rest of us who want to see competitive markets (always best for the consumer)
Small towns can't offer competition to walmart because there market is to small and there is really hardly anything there before a walmart comes to a small town.

Last edited by cwa1984; 12-15-2014 at 12:57 PM..
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Old 12-15-2014, 03:16 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,037 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Are there apartments above it? I believe that is what they meant.
I don't think so, but so what. It's in the Denver city limits, in a very "hip" part of town.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Wrong. You said "no one shops on 'main street' anymore," which is completely untrue. The town I grew up in (Sturgeon Bay) still has its downtown intact. I grew up shopping on 3rd, and my relatives are still doing it. Or Cedarburg, WI. Packed on weekends. Or my current neighborhood in Milwaukee, Bayview, which used to be its own city with its own downtown and is now a part of Milwaukee with its own bustling neighborhood downtown. Wal-Mart is a detriment to downtowns, period. I've seen it personally. I've been to Bentonville; I've worked with the corporate office; I know many people who live there in the bubble as buyers for 3rd parties trying to break in or maintain relationships with the corporate offices. It's cutthroat. You are unaware of pre-Wal-Mart and post-Wal-Mart landscapes in small town America, which are night and day. Perhaps you are too young to remember? Too inexperienced with the ways of the world/business practices? Too brainwashed by the usual propoganda? Because Wal-Mart is bad for local business. Period.
I've said this over and over again, in thread after thread, including this one but:

When Walmart came to the small town of Lafayette, most of the "Mom and Pop" places were already gone. Walmart is being accused of the same thing that Sears was accused of 100 years ago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Enough preaching.

Small towns can't offer competition to walmart because there market is to small and there is really hardly anything there before a walmart comes to a small town.
Agreed.
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Old 12-16-2014, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,405,848 times
Reputation: 2896
Sure, there are some towns that didn't have much to offer before WM came in, but there are also many towns with nice downtowns that got ravaged by WM. I'm not sure why the two of you are trying so hard to come to the defense of a monolithic singular entity that you are not in any way tied financially to (I would assume?), but I figure it must be some weird political thing.

There's a reason why documentaries, websites, blogs, talk shows, etc., have endlessly covered the generally harmful effects of Wal-Mart on small communities, and barely anyone outside Wal-Mart has moved in to dispute these claims.
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Old 12-16-2014, 08:53 AM
 
11,182 posts, read 22,403,520 times
Reputation: 10938
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
I believe they mean with apartments above it. Are there apartments above the one in Chicago?
The Wal-Mart? The one in Lakeview is in a hisotrical building that has a new self storage area on the upper floors of the building (I'm actually renting one of the spaces while I move into a larger condo, it's actually very nice for self storage!). One of them downtown is in a large highrise building.

Or do you mean the Targets? The one up the street from me is incorporated into a development that has the two-floor Target store, 178 apartments, a grocery store and then 10 additional smaller streetfront retail spaces.
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Old 12-16-2014, 10:05 AM
 
12,698 posts, read 10,538,210 times
Reputation: 17611
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Sure, there are some towns that didn't have much to offer before WM came in, but there are also many towns with nice downtowns that got ravaged by WM. I'm not sure why the two of you are trying so hard to come to the defense of a monolithic singular entity that you are not in any way tied financially to (I would assume?), but I figure it must be some weird political thing.

There's a reason why documentaries, websites, blogs, talk shows, etc., have endlessly covered the generally harmful effects of Wal-Mart on small communities, and barely anyone outside Wal-Mart has moved in to dispute these claims.
My town has a lovely downtown with plenty of small businesses, including 2 drug stores/pharmacies. A Walgreens moved into my town, on the edge of downtown, about 5 years ago and one of the 2 family owned drug stores has closed since. Coincidence? Possibly, possibly not. Many businesses in my town, including the drug stores, have been running for decades and suddenly a chain store comes in and one closes?

I'm with you. Maybe stores like Wal-Mart and Target don't ALWAYS affect small local businesses, but one can't deny that they sometimes do.
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Old 12-16-2014, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,278,649 times
Reputation: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I'm not sure why the two of you are trying so hard to come to the defense of a monolithic singular entity that you are not in any way tied financially to (I would assume?),
Because we realize the usefulness of a walmart in a small town where there is nothing there perhaps? Try commuting an hour one way every time you need to go shopping and you would understand the mentality and realize the whole "hurting local business" argument makes no sense when there is no real local business in a small town.

Quote:
but I figure it must be some weird political thing.
What like your preaching earlier?
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Old 12-16-2014, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,405,848 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
What like your preaching earlier?
I've never included a lick of politics - I guarantee you don't have any idea of my stance. However, I can see yours quite clearly.
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Old 12-16-2014, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,405,848 times
Reputation: 2896
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
I'm with you. Maybe stores like Wal-Mart and Target don't ALWAYS affect small local businesses, but one can't deny that they sometimes do.
Exactly. And some towns really didn't have much to offer, but some truly do and predatory large-scale retailers can and have destroyed local economies.

Speaking of economy - can someone arguing for Wal-Mart please link to a theory where monopolies are good for an economy? We're talking Econ 101 here. Competition drives the free market.
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Old 12-16-2014, 01:59 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,037 posts, read 102,723,474 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Sure, there are some towns that didn't have much to offer before WM came in, but there are also many towns with nice downtowns that got ravaged by WM. I'm not sure why the two of you are trying so hard to come to the defense of a monolithic singular entity that you are not in any way tied financially to (I would assume?), but I figure it must be some weird political thing.

There's a reason why documentaries, websites, blogs, talk shows, etc., have endlessly covered the generally harmful effects of Wal-Mart on small communities, and barely anyone outside Wal-Mart has moved in to dispute these claims.
Nice attempt at character assassination bud! I'm not going to dignify that with a response.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Exactly. And some towns really didn't have much to offer, but some truly do and predatory large-scale retailers can and have destroyed local economies.

Speaking of economy - can someone arguing for Wal-Mart please link to a theory where monopolies are good for an economy? We're talking Econ 101 here. Competition drives the free market.
First, I'd like to see some links to these documentaries, websties, blogs and talk shows. Frontline doesn't count; they always come to the conclusion first and then cherry-pick the data to fit the conclusion.

If you're so concerned about "predatory large-scale retailers", why don't you jump on Sears and its parent K-Mart; Penney's; Target; Big Lots; Walgreen's; CVS; et al?
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