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Old 11-16-2017, 05:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
Also Middle Village and Whitestone. Not sure how expensive these parts are.
Surprisingly lots of the eastern half of Brooklyn is pretty red.
Most ethnic groups make do with smaller areas. I'm not convinced that a white working class guy cannot find bars that serve Budweiser on tap or traditional diners in all of Brooklyn or Queens.

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/num...al-primary-nyc
Whitestone is in Northeast Queens, and Middle Village was an example I should have included. But these neighborhoods are both getting expensive and might have changing demographics as well.

There is Budweiser everywhere, and many neighborhoods have diners but that doesn't mean they're white conservative blue collar neighborhoods.

The red parts of Brooklyn on thay map tend to be either Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods or Italian-American neighborhoods, the latter of which there are less and less of in Brooklyn these days. Bensonhurst was a stereotypical Italian neighborhood but is now Chinese, Eastern European, and Mexican.
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Old 11-16-2017, 08:08 AM
 
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Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
Whitestone is in Northeast Queens, and Middle Village was an example I should have included. But these neighborhoods are both getting expensive and might have changing demographics as well.

There is Budweiser everywhere, and many neighborhoods have diners but that doesn't mean they're white conservative blue collar neighborhoods.

The red parts of Brooklyn on thay map tend to be either Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods or Italian-American neighborhoods, the latter of which there are less and less of in Brooklyn these days. Bensonhurst was a stereotypical Italian neighborhood but is now Chinese, Eastern European, and Mexican.
What are better examples of things that one would find in stereotypical white working class neighborhoods? I thought the presence of non-craft alcoholic beverages and non-organic greasy restaurants mean the area hasn't been taken over by hipsters yet

Wouldn't you say the Italian-American areas are working class white?
New York's history is one of changing neighborhood demographics but I think the Orthodox Jews are so well established that they'll still be there in a hundred years. Would working class whites be more comfortable among them than with the Chinese?
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Old 11-16-2017, 08:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkwensky View Post
What are better examples of things that one would find in stereotypical white working class neighborhoods? I thought the presence of non-craft alcoholic beverages and non-organic greasy restaurants mean the area hasn't been taken over by hipsters yet

Wouldn't you say the Italian-American areas are working class white?
New York's history is one of changing neighborhood demographics but I think the Orthodox Jews are so well established that they'll still be there in a hundred years. Would working class whites be more comfortable among them than with the Chinese?
Well, most hipsters are on a budget, they drink plenty of macro beer too. Miller High Life and Tecate in particular. And actually they eat plenty of old school American food and ethnic food as well. A white blue collar neighborhod's main difference would be the type of people who live there, but in terms of establishments, more Italian-American restaurants, more non-ethnic delis (if that's the right term), more bars where old white guys drink, etc. Also, the remaining blue collar white neighborhoods tend to be less urban for NYC standards, with more single family houses rather than apartment buildings.

The Italian-American neighborhoods in NYC aren't really "working class", they might be blue collar but they're very solidly middle class in terms of income. Like I mentioned earlier, some of the union jobs pay very well and offer good benefits. But yes, the Italian-American neighborhoods that are still left are basically the kind of neighborhoods OP is referring to. Most of these are in Staten Island.

I don't think blue collar whites would be more comfortable with Orthodox Jews, they're pretty insular. You're right though, that the Orthodox and Ultra Orthodox Jews are well established.

Another note about diners: you can find them both in black neighborhoods and in hipster neighborhoods, as well as throughout Manhattan even if they're less numerous these days. I was going to go to a diner in Williamsburg at 3AM not too long ago, but the wait for a table was so long that I just decieded to one in Manhattan instead.
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