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Old 12-18-2014, 04:17 PM
 
427 posts, read 379,538 times
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Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post

And how is the Upper Midwest "more conservative" than the Bible Belt? Outside of New England, counties in IA/MN/WI are some of the least conservative rural areas in the country (especially in the Driftless and Iron Range areas).
It's not politically conservative, but the worldview is shaped by the agricultural and blue collar economies. It's more close minded than the coasts, definitely.

Chicago is the best area in the Midwest for visual artists being a very large art market, but you're not going to find the bohemian art scene of the coasts, or the presence of the high world.
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Old 12-18-2014, 04:39 PM
 
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That is true. You're typically going to find a lot of snooty liberal granolas on the coasts marveling at the degenerate work of fellow commies like Picasso or Rothko.
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Old 12-19-2014, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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^ You're both nuts in completely different ways
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Old 12-19-2014, 12:03 PM
 
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Old 12-19-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
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How is Picasso's work "degenerate?" Be specific.
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Old 12-19-2014, 02:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
How is Picasso's work "degenerate?" Be specific.
Do you know the definition of "degenerate?" Look it up and then look at the commie's work. It speaks for itself. His work is garbage and I could find a million pieces of art from any high school classroom that are better than his crap. There's no set detail with his work like you find with true artists like Michelangelo. Just random asymmetrical shapes and lines and poorly drawn features. Picasso was a POS as an artist and a person. If I could say more about him without getting banned I would.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinderim..._d5459987h.jpg
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Old 12-19-2014, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
Do you know the definition of "degenerate?" Look it up and then look at the commie's work. It speaks for itself. His work is garbage and I could find a million pieces of art from any high school classroom that are better than his crap. There's no set detail with his work like you find with true artists like Michelangelo. Just random asymmetrical shapes and lines and poorly drawn features. Picasso was a POS as an artist and a person. If I could say more about him without getting banned I would.

http://www.christies.com/lotfinderim..._d5459987h.jpg
Picasso was a master of representational art at a very young age. Here is an example from when he was a young teenager: http://www.artknowledgenews.com/file...nd-Charity.jpg

As a genius (yes, genius) of the field, one he had mastered at a young age, Picasso was bored with artistic constraint (as all great artists should be) and started experimenting. His experiments were so powerful they changed the face of visual art.

Picasso was as capable as anyone in history in terms of creating "representational" art, and did so for a while. He also had sculptures and drawings that were representational throughout. He could do that in his sleep. What was challenging was rethinking visual art in the wake of photography - who needed "perfect" representation (note: the Masters of the Renaissance cheated using a camera obscura to sketch from real subjects, and the Greek/Roman sculptors used real body casts) anymore? So he tried representing differenct dimensions simultaneously, flattening others, etc., much of which was inspired by ancient artists and craftsmen.

While he was pretty sure there would be some people with limited comprehension and brainpower that wouldn't understand his experiments 80 years ago, I'm pretty sure he would be baffled as hell that there were still luddites crawling about in the next milenium who still couldn't get it
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Old 12-19-2014, 06:26 PM
 
1,229 posts, read 975,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
Picasso was a master of representational art at a very young age. Here is an example from when he was a young teenager: http://www.artknowledgenews.com/file...nd-Charity.jpg

As a genius (yes, genius) of the field, one he had mastered at a young age, Picasso was bored with artistic constraint (as all great artists should be) and started experimenting. His experiments were so powerful they changed the face of visual art.

Picasso was as capable as anyone in history in terms of creating "representational" art, and did so for a while. He also had sculptures and drawings that were representational throughout. He could do that in his sleep. What was challenging was rethinking visual art in the wake of photography - who needed "perfect" representation (note: the Masters of the Renaissance cheated using a camera obscura to sketch from real subjects, and the Greek/Roman sculptors used real body casts) anymore? So he tried representing differenct dimensions simultaneously, flattening others, etc., much of which was inspired by ancient artists and craftsmen.

While he was pretty sure there would be some people with limited comprehension and brainpower that wouldn't understand his experiments 80 years ago, I'm pretty sure he would be baffled as hell that there were still luddites crawling about in the next milenium who still couldn't get it
Your post sounds suspiciously similar to outside sources. Almost as if you quoted and slightly reworded them.

How does photography take away from representational art and especially the skill needed to create it? Simply because of photography we needed to "reinvent art" by scribbling like a child? Picasso became a commie freak as an adult and like all commie freaks despises any amount of European traditionalism and order so picks up some perverted forms of "expressionist" anarchic trash, paving the way for other fellow perverted freaks like Mark Rothko to be hung in art museums today. In reality a high schooler can do it and there is nothing impressive about the majority of Picasso's later work.

I guess I just "don't get" this either right?
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/...36_634x491.jpg

Last edited by joeyg2014; 12-19-2014 at 06:39 PM..
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,398,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joeyg2014 View Post
Your post sounds suspiciously similar to outside sources. Almost as if you quoted and slightly reworded them.

How does photography take away from representational art and especially the skill needed to create it? Simply because of photography we needed to "reinvent art" by scribbling like a child? Picasso became a commie freak as an adult and like all commie freaks despises any amount of European traditionalism and order so picks up some perverted forms of "expressionist" anarchic trash, paving the way for other fellow perverted freaks like Mark Rothko to be hung in art museums today. In reality a high schooler can do it and there is nothing impressive about the majority of Picasso's later work.

I guess I just "don't get" this either right?
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/...36_634x491.jpg
Listen buddy, I've set up musicians and art installations for decades, and I can talk ad nauseam (just ask my unfortunate lady) on the topic of art. If you can't keep up, it's unsurprising (given your weird "degenerate" comments and general cluelessness), but it certainly isn't my fault.

1. The whole justification of non-represenational art was driven by the fact that you could now take pictures and actually represent a scene, completely removing the utility aspect of visual art that until that point was "the point" or at least largely or partly "the point." This freed artists from convention. Further, the explosion of non-representational art coincided with the advent of widespread photography, so forget about "why the need," it's simply what happened. The reasons are pretty obvious. I suggest taking your first art history class if this is still confusing to you. And with Picasso, he was in complete control and "random" wasn't a part of the process, be it lines or composition or whatever.

2. Again, as a high schooler, Picasso was already a master of representational art. Did you not read a word of my previous post? He was so good at painting stuff the way it looked or in the tradition of established disciplines that he got bored and started painting unlike anything that had been painted before (though the cubism he's most famous for was partially-inspired by another early cubist, Georges Braque). This is why he is notable today, and not yet another in the centuries-long line of people painting a lake, or a bowl of fruit, or some rich dude who comissioned a portrait.

3. Your commie blather has little to do with art. In the art field, there are Republicans and Democrats; one thing every educated person will agree with regardless of political affiliation is that Picasso was one of the greatest artists of the century. Only weird 1-percenter Birchers with zero knowledge of art are pushing what you're pushing here, bud.

4. Those "paintings" you posted aren't interesting to me. I'm not a big fan of art as philosophy only - I like nice pictures. If you can break down convention and make a nice picture, even if it's a bunch of non-representational colors/lines, I can get into it. A white "painting" is the lowest-hanging fruit ever. I'm sure some rich idiot got buffaloed into buying that, as money has zero to do with insight. Still not sure what all this has to do with communism, though
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Self explanatory
11,627 posts, read 4,923,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
I'm more interested in seeing the top 10 'Fartsy' States list
The 10 most conservative (and liberal) cities in America - Salon.com
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