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Old 12-20-2014, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
Reputation: 2858

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I would skip college, learn a trade, and get a job in the Midwest (Cheapest COL). Number one priority is buy a small & dirt cheap fixer upper house with cash. Start saving. You will be far richer and financially stable than the majority of twentysomethings and older that are in debt or scraping because of student loans, car payments, rents, mortgages, etc. Get bored? Take the money you have saved and travel or buy a vacation home.

The world and economy has changed. People need to wake up to the fact that this it isn't the 90s/early 00s any longer and the lifestyle doesn't exist.

 
Old 12-20-2014, 06:28 AM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
10,421 posts, read 12,406,700 times
Reputation: 4846
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
I would skip college, learn a trade, and get a job in the Midwest (Cheapest COL). Number one priority is buy a small & dirt cheap fixer upper house with cash. Start saving. You will be far richer and financially stable than the majority of twentysomethings and older that are in debt or scraping because of student loans, car payments, rents, mortgages, etc. Get bored? Take the money you have saved and travel or buy a vacation home.

The world and economy has changed. People need to wake up to the fact that this it isn't the 90s/early 00s any longer and the lifestyle doesn't exist.
You sound exactly like my stepbrother, he died last April in a truck crash at age 27.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 07:00 AM
 
10,552 posts, read 13,107,085 times
Reputation: 6331
I wouldn't change what I did. Chicago, unless I moved out of the country.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Tampa
734 posts, read 731,829 times
Reputation: 759
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
You sound exactly like my stepbrother, he died last April in a truck crash at age 27.
His point, while extreme, is a good one.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Baghdad by the Bay (San Francisco, California)
3,530 posts, read 4,262,305 times
Reputation: 3145
Early 20s (if I had it to do over again) --I'd choose between LA, San Francisco, and New York, and probably end up going to LA (nice mix of California lifestyle with youth culture and the most affordable of my three favorites). In my opinion, an early 20s, career-driven person in a creative field can't go wrong in any of these three cities.

As I matured and priorities changed, the benefits of SF and NYC rose to the top and LA lost a bit (though certainly not all) of its luster. It became a dead heat of the three judging from a 30s perspective--again, no wrong answer among these three for someone with some degree of ambition, drive and talent to make a life for himself.

In my 40s, San Francisco and NYC have distinguished themselves from LA as more desirable places to live an urban lifestyle. It's a toss-up to me between these two, with a slight edge to SF, based solely on personal preferences.

Projecting to my 50s, I believe SF (actually the greater Bay Area) will pull ahead for good.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 01:02 PM
 
251 posts, read 236,975 times
Reputation: 171
SF and LA for the West.

NYC and Philly for the East.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 05:23 PM
 
44 posts, read 51,169 times
Reputation: 24
The San Francisco Bay Area. The Financial District, SOMA, San Mateo, Burlingame, or Walnut Creek.

Why? Beautiful weather, beautiful views, a lot to do, great location being close to every type of weather and outdoor activity, and higher incomes with good work opportunity.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,144 posts, read 2,824,419 times
Reputation: 2858
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davy-040 View Post
You sound exactly like my stepbrother, he died last April in a truck crash at age 27.
And that mindset is why over 60% of all twentysomethings have no savings.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 06:45 PM
 
1,566 posts, read 577,574 times
Reputation: 3336
Des Moines or Cedar Rapids, Iowa. These cities are just big enough to have plenty to do. There is employment, and housing is a reasonable cost. There are plenty of young people around. You do not have to travel very far to get to work; there are lovely parks close by. Great farmers markets with home grown vegetables filled with vitamins. There is a great quality of life in these cities.
 
Old 12-20-2014, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
3,738 posts, read 2,556,056 times
Reputation: 5379
I stayed in my college town for my early 20's; which is about 30 minutes from where I grew up. Actually I came back a year after I graduated ( my first year out I spent working for an outdoor education program at a residential camp in the mountains of NC). Originally I was going to go to grad school but ended up realizing that I didn't really need the masters degree for the field I was passionate about; and ended up getting a decent full-time salaried with benefits job with an organization that I feel very tied to and working for people whom I admire and view as mentors and with peers who are now good friends of mine.

Of my closest group of friends from both high school and college; I am literally the only one who did NOT either go to grad school or move far away in hopes of starting fresh (but without solid full-time employment lined up) or grad school.....and now all but 1 have either moved back or are planning on moving back. They did have great experiences in the major cities they moved to (Seattle, Houston, Boston, LA, and Tokyo to name a few) but they're all in debt (moving is expensive; regardless of the COL of the place you are moving to) and have much less stable jobs because they moved around so much and didn't build strong networks. Meanwhile I have health insurance, a 403b, a decent amount in my savings and may actually be able to buy a place of my own in a relatively expensive real estate market here soon because I "bucked the trend" and stayed semi-local.

Not saying that it isn't possible for people to move around a lot and still be financially secure or that there isn't value in experiencing life in a big city and/or somewhere very different from where you've spend most of your life. I do however feel like that's almost become a new standard part of life experience for my generation when it doesn't necessarily make everyone better off and is a little over-hyped.
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