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Old 12-28-2014, 07:43 AM
 
Location: Research Triangle Area, NC
3,758 posts, read 2,569,697 times
Reputation: 5394

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Old 12-28-2014, 08:33 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,222 posts, read 17,963,194 times
Reputation: 14658
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
I could see either Georgia and/or North Carolina eventually making it further up the rankings to reach the #5 slot. It may take another decade or so but it is definitely possible. The current holders of the #5 through #7 slots are not known for being tremendous job creators and I forecast them to decline due to the aging of the baby boomers.
Georgia and North Carolina will not pass Illinois, Pennsylvania or Ohio anytime soon. Given Georgia's growth rate between 2010 and 2014, its population won't even reach 12,000,000 by 2030, so you'd have to assume that Ohio gains no population at all for 20 years, and Illinois and Pennsylvania each lose over 1,000,000 people. Ain't happening.

Georgia's fastest decade of growth was the 1990s, and it's been slowing down since. In fact, Georgia is on pace for its slowest decade of growth since the 1950s, percentage-wise.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,334 posts, read 10,313,168 times
Reputation: 5400
I would like to ask all those residents of Florida, what population would they like to see their state reach? Is 40 million too many? How bout 50 million. Do they think Florida can sustain an unlimited population?

Seriously people, why is population growth thought of as so wonderful in this country. I wish immigration, both legal and illegal, was totally stopped for about 5 years. Then a slow but steady stream would be allowed in from there on out. Maybe at most 500,000 per year. Interesting that Australia and Canada, far less populated than the US, allow so many fewer migrants.

I would hate to see any state with 50 million people. It is just not sustainable, unless you want the kind of population density you have in Europe.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
Georgia and North Carolina will not pass Illinois, Pennsylvania or Ohio anytime soon. Given Georgia's growth rate between 2010 and 2014, its population won't even reach 12,000,000 by 2030, so you'd have to assume that Ohio gains no population at all for 20 years, and Illinois and Pennsylvania each lose over 1,000,000 people. Ain't happening.

Georgia's fastest decade of growth was the 1990s, and it's been slowing down since. In fact, Georgia is on pace for its slowest decade of growth since the 1950s, percentage-wise.
Yep. Ohio is not growing fast, but it's still growing. If we account for slowing growth in both cases, and the rate of it slowing, Georgia won't pass Ohio through at least the mid-2030s. And that assumes a lot, as growth rates could change in both cases. Ohio because it's now an increasingly important energy state (like Pennsylvania), and because it's doing better than the national average economically, and Georgia for perhaps a slowing boom, increases in cost of living, etc.

North Carolina is growing faster than Georgia, but it would still be around 2030 or so before catching up. It's growth rate dropped almost 31% between the 2000s and this decade so far, and that was an acceleration of the slowdown from the 1990s. Based on the same rate of slowdown, it would be between 35%-40% slower in the 2020s.

But again, all this assumes a lot of things. Who knows what will happen.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,126,475 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I would like to ask all those residents of Florida, what population would they like to see their state reach? Is 40 million too many? How bout 50 million. Do they think Florida can sustain an unlimited population?

Seriously people, why is population growth thought of as so wonderful in this country. I wish immigration, both legal and illegal, was totally stopped for about 5 years. Then a slow but steady stream would be allowed in from there on out. Maybe at most 500,000 per year. Interesting that Australia and Canada, far less populated than the US, allow so many fewer migrants.

I would hate to see any state with 50 million people. It is just not sustainable, unless you want the kind of population density you have in Europe.
That is a great point.

Population growth is a good thing, but generally only up to a certain point, where it becomes unruly, hard to manage and possibly degrades the quality of life.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Mexico City, formerly Columbus, Ohio
13,103 posts, read 13,491,061 times
Reputation: 5778
Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I would like to ask all those residents of Florida, what population would they like to see their state reach? Is 40 million too many? How bout 50 million. Do they think Florida can sustain an unlimited population?

Seriously people, why is population growth thought of as so wonderful in this country. I wish immigration, both legal and illegal, was totally stopped for about 5 years. Then a slow but steady stream would be allowed in from there on out. Maybe at most 500,000 per year. Interesting that Australia and Canada, far less populated than the US, allow so many fewer migrants.

I would hate to see any state with 50 million people. It is just not sustainable, unless you want the kind of population density you have in Europe.
The only states with the growth rates to reach 50 million first would be California, Florida and Texas. I think you would see growth rates slow way down before that point. All those people demanding and consuming resources will naturally cause cost of living to rise even more. There is a tipping point. People will start looking elsewhere.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:16 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,516 posts, read 17,740,343 times
Reputation: 30801
Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Those items can be grown in many areas but citrus is restricted to very warm climates and provides high amounts of vitamin C which is critical to prevent ailments such as scurvy. People forget about things like scurvy due our capitalist, consumer driven culture where everything is available in stores, but if the unthinkable was to ever happen, I would be on my way to an environment that can sustain citrus and other plants that provide vitamin C.

"Scurvy often presents itself initially as symptoms of malaise and lethargy, followed by formation of spots on the skin, spongy gums, and bleeding from the mucous membranes. Spots are most abundant on the thighs and legs, and a person with the ailment looks pale, feels depressed, and is partially immobilized. As scurvy advances, there can be open, suppurating wounds, loss of teeth, jaundice, fever, neuropathy and death."
Scurvy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Scurvy sounds nastier than Ebola.
Organ meats provide plenty of vitamin C and was the most common dietary source for the vast majority of humanity for tens if not hundreds of thousands of years. Do you think there was no human population outside of southern Asia (where citrus is native to) until the last couple hundred years when citrus was became available to most of the world?

Furthermore, cruciferous vegetables (Broccoli, leafy greens) and berries which are available in many parts of the world are actually higher in vitamin C content than citrus fruits. Florida is not singlehandedly saving the word from death by bleeding gums.

Don't get me wrong, I love citrus fruits, but I don't think that living outside the citrus zone is some unbelievable punishment. If I could not get citrus, my delicious liver and onions dinners would get me by just fine.

Finally, I don't get why anyone cares whether Florida or NY has the bigger population.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,126,475 times
Reputation: 7075
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbcmh81 View Post
The only states with the growth rates to reach 50 million first would be California, Florida and Texas. I think you would see growth rates slow way down before that point. All those people demanding and consuming resources will naturally cause cost of living to rise even more. There is a tipping point. People will start looking elsewhere.
I believe this is already happening with California. Despite a major influx of immigrant population growth, many native Californians have been fleeing the state due to high cost of living and corrupt government. They've been going to places like Arizona, Oregon, Washington or even the east coast. In the Connecticut forum, for example, it is quite common to see threads about someone moving from CA to CT.
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
2,436 posts, read 2,124,483 times
Reputation: 2262
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I believe this is already happening with California. Despite a major influx of immigrant population growth, many native Californians have been fleeing the state due to high cost of living and corrupt government. They've been going to places like Arizona, Oregon, Washington or even the east coast. In the Connecticut forum, for example, it is quite common to see threads about someone moving from CA to CT.
Plenty of people move out of their home states. It's not just a California thing. And while Californians are moving out, transplants are taking their place. The Los Angeles forum alone had multiple threads where people are planning to move to California. Go to each sub forum and there will be people talking about moving to the Golden State.
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:17 PM
 
Location: Austin
1,795 posts, read 2,568,107 times
Reputation: 1203
Growth can only last for so long as stated above. On the other hand Texas could handle 50 million in population and still be affordable due to it's size and multiple cities across the state.
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