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Old 12-27-2014, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Area, Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Those areas in Michigan do have a lot of Jewish people, but they also have large numbers of Arabs. Maybe not such a good mix, as it has not worked out so well in Isreal.

Jewish, Muslim volunteers do good Christmas Day deeds
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Not true. There are huge Sephardi/Mizrahi populations in the NYC area. There are more Syrian Jews in Brooklyn than in Israel.
Now let's go back to the topic question:

Quote:
US Cities With Most Middle-Eastern/Jewish Influence?
What exists now in NYC (mostly in Brooklyn) are elderly Syrians who were evicted from the Middle East as late as the early 1950's, their children who are now in their 50s-60s and now their children who are completely assimilated into American culture. So basically you are looking at 3rd generation Sephardi/Mizrahi Jews who for the most part are no different then anyone else including Askenazi Jews. So now they are secular. Now if the OP is looking for Orthodox Jews, then there many pockets of them in Brooklyn but they are not affordable unless you belong to a Chassidic sect. And two, they have a religious feeling rather than a Jewish feeling. But in general there are little to no neighborhoods that have a Jewish vibe to them.
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:43 PM
 
Location: San Francisco/East Bay and Los Angeles, formerly DC and Boston
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Bethesda-Potomac-Rockville, in DC's Maryland suburbs.
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Old 12-27-2014, 02:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Now let's go back to the topic question:



What exists now in NYC (mostly in Brooklyn) are elderly Syrians who were evicted from the Middle East as late as the early 1950's, their children who are now in their 50s-60s and now their children who are completely assimilated into American culture. So basically you are looking at 3rd generation Sephardi/Mizrahi Jews who for the most part are no different then anyone else including Askenazi Jews. So now they are secular. Now if the OP is looking for Orthodox Jews, then there many pockets of them in Brooklyn but they are not affordable unless you belong to a Chassidic sect. And two, they have a religious feeling rather than a Jewish feeling. But in general there are little to no neighborhoods that have a Jewish vibe to them.
I don't think you're familiar with this community, at all. Outside of Israel, you cannot get more of a "Jewish vibe" than Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish population on earth outside of Israel, and it is (generally speaking) VERY observant and mostly Orthodox or Hasidic.

These communities in Brooklyn, for the most part, have NOTHING to do with "typical" Jewish neighborhoods in the U.S. or Canada or Western Europe. You cannot find "delis", you are more likely to find a Moroccan or Egyptian or Yemeni restaurant. Following the rise of the Arab states after WW2, these communities mostly left for the NYC area (especially Brooklyn) and replaced Askenazi Jews who were moving to the suburbs or otherwise assimilating into "mainstream" U.S. culture. This is why Brooklyn feels MUCH more Jewish than 40 years ago; because the Jewish neighborhoods now are not going to assimilate, ever, in fact they are growing very rapidly (go to the northern half of Bed Stuy, it's mostly Hasidic Jewish at this point, which probably would blow people's minds).

The Syrian Jews in Brooklyn (who are part of a much larger community of Brooklyn Sephardic Jews from basically all over the Middle East, from Morocco to Yemen) are NOT secular and are NOT living in the same neighborhoods as Askenazi Jews. They eat totally different food that "sterotypical" American Jewish food, they have totally different cultural traditions, they attend different schuls, they worship at different synagogues.

In fact they are living in very insular, distinct communities that are very religious and solidly Orthodox. There is almost no intermarriage outside of the Syrian Orthodox community, at all. The intermarriage rate (I'm not talking with non-Jews, I'm talking with non Syrian Orthodox Jews) is close to zero. This is how the SY Jews (that's how they generally refer to themselves) keep their distinct culture as generations pass.
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Old 12-27-2014, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
I don't think you're familiar with this community, at all. Outside of Israel, you cannot get more of a "Jewish vibe" than Brooklyn. Brooklyn has the largest Jewish population on earth outside of Israel, and it is (generally speaking) VERY observant and mostly Orthodox or Hasidic.

These communities in Brooklyn, for the most part, have NOTHING to do with "typical" Jewish neighborhoods in the U.S. or Canada or Western Europe. You cannot find "delis", you are more likely to find a Moroccan or Egyptian or Yemeni restaurant. Following the rise of the Arab states after WW2, these communities mostly left for the NYC area (especially Brooklyn) and replaced Askenazi Jews who were moving to the suburbs or otherwise assimilating into "mainstream" U.S. culture. This is why Brooklyn feels MUCH more Jewish than 40 years ago; because the Jewish neighborhoods now are not going to assimilate, ever, in fact they are growing very rapidly (go to the northern half of Bed Stuy, it's mostly Hasidic Jewish at this point, which probably would blow people's minds).

The Syrian Jews in Brooklyn (who are part of a much larger community of Brooklyn Sephardic Jews from basically all over the Middle East, from Morocco to Yemen) are NOT secular and are NOT living in the same neighborhoods as Askenazi Jews. They eat totally different food that "sterotypical" American Jewish food, they have totally different cultural traditions, they attend different schuls, they worship at different synagogues.

In fact they are living in very insular, distinct communities that are very religious and solidly Orthodox. There is almost no intermarriage outside of the Syrian Orthodox community, at all. The intermarriage rate (I'm not talking with non-Jews, I'm talking with non Syrian Orthodox Jews) is close to zero.
Ummm....You did notice the word Mizrahi below my handle, right?? Or maybe you would like a walk through of Ahi Ezer (congregation and the school). I may not live in NYC anymore, but I can personally tell you what the current generation is like.

And back to the OP: Affordable. Not a chance.

Manhattan's Upper East Side Sees an Influx of Syrian Jews – Tablet Magazine
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Old 12-27-2014, 05:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
Ummm....You did notice the word Mizrahi below my handle, right?? Or maybe you would like a walk through of Ahi Ezer (congregation and the school). I may not live in NYC anymore, but I can personally tell you what the current generation is like.

And back to the OP: Affordable. Not a chance.

Manhattan's Upper East Side Sees an Influx of Syrian Jews – Tablet Magazine
I know the community very, very well, have close business ties with the community (but I am not a member) and I don't agree with anything you wrote.

The Upper East Side does not have a large SY community compared to Gravesend. There are some wealthy SY Jews that live on the UES, and they are probably more secular than Gravesend SY Jews, but we are talking a tiny number.

The VAST majority of SY Jews live in Gravesend, Brooklyn and Deal, NJ. There are very few in Manhattan. The community leadership, the main synagogues, the stores and everything, are in Brooklyn, especially around Kings Hwy and Ave. U.
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Old 12-27-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
....

The VAST majority of SY Jews live in Gravesend, Brooklyn and Deal, NJ. There are very few in Manhattan. The community leadership, the main synagogues, the stores and everything, are in Brooklyn, especially around Kings Hwy and Ave. U.
Store wise it is not as it was decades ago. People wise its either the older generation (50+) and the Orthodox and extremely more clique than it once was and makes the Chassids look like a open community. A bunch of us got together in the UWS where many said they'd try to make it, but only eight arrived (of which only two still live in the Ave U area). Past that we're everywhere as our business models have changed through the decades. Looking at the area, there are many more synagogues then there was once. One does know that Jews are around you, but it doesn't feel like a neighborhood. Now if we were in Israel, even as generations have moved apart friends and relatives are still closely connected. When I walk through the Sephardi/Mizrahi/Muslim areas in Israel, I feel more connected then when I walk through Ashkenazi areas. Personally I give it maybe another generation when those of us from the second generation are dead and gone that the area will either become more Ultra Orthodox or look like Canarsie.
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Old 12-27-2014, 09:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pruzhany View Post
SPersonally I give it maybe another generation when those of us from the second generation are dead and gone that the area will either become more Ultra Orthodox or look like Canarsie.
Neither scenario will happen. The SY community will continue to expand and prosper, as it has over the past half century. The community is growing, and has never been larger or more prosperous.

The core residential lots between Kings Hwy and Ave. U can go for $10 million+ for (a tiny plot) of raw land. It's possibly the richest Jewish neighborhood in the world. The SY community includes everyone from billionaires to the poor, all in one neighborhood.

There are very few ultra-Orthodox in the neighborhood, so I don't see why they would live there one day. By "look like Canarsie" do you mean a Caribbean neighborhood (Canarsie these days is mostly Caribbean). That makes no sense on any level. The West Indian population in Brooklyn is shrinking and the Jewish population is growing, and in any case, the Caribbean population lives on the complete other side of Brooklyn, across Flatbush Ave.
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Old 12-27-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Neither scenario will happen. The SY community will continue to expand and prosper, as it has over the past half century. The community is growing, and has never been larger or more prosperous.

The core residential lots between Kings Hwy and Ave. U can go for $10 million+ for (a tiny plot) of raw land. It's possibly the richest Jewish neighborhood in the world. The SY community includes everyone from billionaires to the poor, all in one neighborhood.
It's good that you are an optimist about future generations and hopefully they will do what you think they will do, but from my perspective we haven't. Out of my entire family, classmates and friends from the area only two are still in the neighborhood. But back to the OP, I don't think the poster will find a Jewish community to fit into if they are Sephardi or Mizrahi they may find fitting in to a Muslim area easier if they are looking for the cultural aspect. I've stopped going down to Florida as I don't feel the Jewish vibe there anymore and my NY trips are now one day trips (fly in early in the morning and fly out late the same night).
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Old 12-27-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Eretz Yisrael
21,376 posts, read 24,137,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
...

There are very few ultra-Orthodox in the neighborhood, so I don't see why they would live there one day. By "look like Canarsie" do you mean a Caribbean neighborhood (Canarsie these days is mostly Caribbean). That makes no sense on any level. The West Indian population in Brooklyn is shrinking and the Jewish population is growing, and in any case, the Caribbean population lives on the complete other side of Brooklyn, across Flatbush Ave.
What are you talking about? The Ultra Orthodox line Bedford Ave and Ocean Pkwy and are buying everything up in between. As to Canarsie, there was a strong Jewish presence from the Paerdegats to Rockaway Pkwy. Flatbush Ave (maybe you were thinking Flatlands) is not in Canarsie. Its a tangent to Mill Basin.
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