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Old 12-28-2014, 08:29 AM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,264,914 times
Reputation: 1645

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In general, I'm not really surprised. I'm a native of the Research Triangle region of North Carolina, one area that has experienced a ton of growth and influx of transplants. For the longest time, it never hit me until I went to college and a girl from South Carolina rolled her eyes when I told her I was southern. "Raleigh is so full of Yankees these days. You think you're from the South, but you're not." I experienced a similar reaction from an Alabama girl, who basically didn't believe North Carolina was in the South since it's NORTH Carolina. In her eyes, apparently South Carolina is the South but not NC. Getting back to the original topic, I did grow up with many children of transplants, and they were mainly from states like New Jersey and New York. Why the majority of them seemed to come from those two states beats the hell out of me. In one of my middle school classes, I had 8 kids from New Jersey! The teacher was shocked, she was from NC but I don't think a native of the Triangle. "WHY are so many of y'all from New Jersey?" Same story in high school, one of my best friends moved down here from a Long Island suburb. Don't get me wrong, I'm happy Raleigh is growing, but I don't like the way it's heading. I wish less transplants moved here. There, I said it. We're beginning to receive a reputation of being a soulless, vanilla, cookie-cutter/strip mall, suburban sprawl-ish metro.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,656 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63205
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
The superrich gravitate to the NYC area and to Coastal California. They generally aren't born there. They choose to live there.

They could live anywhere they wanted to, anywhere on the planet, and choose these places.

This whole concept of considering where the "super rich" choose to live as indicative of "the most desirable places to live" is flawed.

The "super rich" don't have to use the freeways - they have drivers. They don't have to go grocery shopping. They don't have to use public transportation. They don't have to walk down any sketchy streets. They don't have to budget for their rent or mortgage. They don't have to fight crowds. If they want to go to the beach, they go to a private beach. If they go to a club, it's often a private club. When they fly, they fly first class or on a private jet. They don't have a little boat that's docked alongside a thousand others - they have a yacht.

They don't live with the same realities that the vast majority of other people do. They can create their own idyllic reality within a bubble just about anywhere.

Even so, they congregate in some of the most expensive areas of the world for some of the same reasons we choose where we live - friends, weather, work, availability of things that interest us, real estate options, etc.
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Old 12-28-2014, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,330 posts, read 10,298,159 times
Reputation: 5389
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
In general, I'm not really surprised. I'm a native of the Research Triangle region of North Carolina, one area that has experienced a ton of growth and influx of transplants. For the longest time, it never hit me until I went to college and a girl from South Carolina rolled her eyes when I told her I was southern. "Raleigh is so full of Yankees these days. You think you're from the South, but you're not." I experienced a similar reaction from an Alabama girl, who basically didn't believe North Carolina was in the South since it's NORTH Carolina. In her eyes, apparently South Carolina is the South but not NC. Getting back to the original topic, I did grow up with many children of transplants, and they were mainly from states like New Jersey and New York. Why the majority of them seemed to come from those two states beats the hell out of me. In one of my middle school classes, I had 8 kids from New Jersey! The teacher was shocked, she was from NC but I don't think a native of the Triangle. "WHY are so many of y'all from New Jersey?" Same story in high school, one of my best friends moved down here from a Long Island suburb. Don't get me wrong, I'm happy Raleigh is growing, but I don't like the way it's heading. I wish less transplants moved here. There, I said it. We're beginning to receive a reputation of being a soulless, vanilla, cookie-cutter/strip mall, suburban sprawl-ish metro.


Two things stand out in your post. One is, why do southerners care so much about whether or not another state is "southern" enough? This constant harping about how southern a person is, or which state is more southern than another, or why "Yankees" are so distasteful, etc. etc. Why do you think you people are so special compared to every other area of the US? Why so much dislike for "Yankees"? Do you wish that the Civil War turned out differently or something? You people go on and on complaining about how much trash talk the south gets, yet all you see on this forum are constant posts about how awful "Yankee transplants" are, or how wonderful the south is compared to every other region.

Do you not realize that millions of southerners moved to the North during WWII? 5M southerners moved to the north from 1941 to 1970. Am curious why you southerners never talk about this migration. Why is that?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_...rican_American)



Because of the Civil War and the 14th Amendment, a person living in Brooklyn has just as much right to move into a suburb of Charleston and live and act any way they want within the law. They don't have to adapt to your view of how a person should live in the South. Every American is a citizen of the US first and foremost, and a "resident" of a state. There is no such thing as "state citizenship", only residency. And the Supreme Court ruled in 1971 that the most a state can make someone wait to be a resident (with the right to vote in that state) is 30 days. They are a US citizen and you can't make them live by your "culture". They may not fit in, or **** people off, but it is a "free" country and they can live just as they did in Brooklyn.


Residency Requirements for Voting | Infoplease.com

The Supreme Court decision of March 21, 1972, declared lengthy requirements for voting in state and local elections unconstitutional and suggested that 30 days was an ample period. Most of the states have changed or eliminated their durational residency requirements to comply with the ruling, as shown



You live in a nation with 50 states and over 300M people. Yet you single out "Yankees" as these sorts of foreign invaders or hordes of people destroying your precious "south". Too bad. You live in one nation, not 50 little republics. People in any state have the right to move anywhere they want, and why should they be called "Yankees" anyway? Are they not your fellow citizens?

This country is so fu.. up it is incredible. Honestly don't you people think it is time to break this country apart, and let the South have what it wants. Obviously a land free of anyone they deem to different and not "southern" enough. This is why I say the US is done, over. Time to move on. We don't belong in the same nation anymore. We probably never did belong in the same country. Just too different.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Between amicable and ornery
1,097 posts, read 1,450,737 times
Reputation: 1468
Shock and awe. I don't know whether to type or give applause for a Jack Nicholson type written presentation. I felt like you were saying, "you can't handle the truth!". In all seriousness, southerners are very nice people who from my perspective like to live with/in the past. That's the great part of being in a union is the ability to chose. Not everyone wants to be bunched up together and I respect that. Other people live different lifestyles and I respect that too. God Bless America from the east to the west, this is the country that I like the best. Can't re-read or edit this too well as I'm on my teeny tiny phone.
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Old 12-28-2014, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,113,945 times
Reputation: 7075
I agree with Kathryn.

Even if I was a billionaire, I would not choose to live in a big city/metro like NYC or LA. Even Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Philly, etc. are too big for me. I guess the one thing I like about living in Fairfield County is that it's not part of the NYC metro!
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,113,945 times
Reputation: 7075
Here is a list of all metro areas in the South that have median home values HIGHER than the national median home value of $173,900 as of 2013. Notice how they are all exclusively within Maryland, Delaware, DC, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida and Texas. None of them are in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky or West Virginia.

Washington
Baltimore
Charlottesville
Naples
Hilton Head Island
Virginia Beach
The Villages
Austin
Richmond
Salisbury
Raleigh
Harrisonburg
Durham
Winchester
Dover
Wilmington
Miami
Staunton
Charleston
Asheville
Crestview
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:52 AM
 
1,640 posts, read 2,046,833 times
Reputation: 2543
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
In general, I'm not really surprised. I'm a native of the Research Triangle region of North Carolina, one area that has experienced a ton of growth and influx of transplants. For the longest time, it never hit me until I went to college and a girl from South Carolina rolled her eyes when I told her I was southern. "Raleigh is so full of Yankees these days. You think you're from the South, but you're not." I experienced a similar reaction from an Alabama girl, who basically didn't believe North Carolina was in the South since it's NORTH Carolina. In her eyes, apparently South Carolina is the South but not NC. Getting back to the original topic, I did grow up with many children of transplants, and they were mainly from states like New Jersey and New York. Why the majority of them seemed to come from those two states beats the hell out of me. In one of my middle school classes, I had 8 kids from New Jersey! The teacher was shocked, she was from NC but I don't think a native of the Triangle. "WHY are so many of y'all from New Jersey?" Same story in high school, one of my best friends moved down here from a Long Island suburb. Don't get me wrong, I'm happy Raleigh is growing, but I don't like the way it's heading. I wish less transplants moved here. There, I said it. We're beginning to receive a reputation of being a soulless, vanilla, cookie-cutter/strip mall, suburban sprawl-ish metro.
Despite the number of transplants from the Northeast, for me personally, North Carolina is just too Southern. Even though people say North Carolina is simply where a bunch of Nor'easters and Florida halfbacks go for bigger, newer, cheaper housing, I disagree. North Carolina, especially in the smaller towns and rural areas, is very backwards. There's still too much "Bubba talk" and too many "Bible thumpers" for me to truly like it there, not to mention people there don't particularly care for "Yankees" all that much, either.
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:55 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,244,373 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
This whole concept of considering where the "super rich" choose to live as indicative of "the most desirable places to live" is flawed.
You don't explain why it's flawed, but fine, let's ignore where the rich choose to live, and let's take your advice and use the entire U.S. population.

Where are the poorest areas and cheapest prices in the U.S.? The Southeast. Where are the richest areas and highest prices in the U.S.? Everywhere else.

No matter how you slice it, the South is the poorest, least desirable part of the country. This isn't debatable.
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Old 12-28-2014, 11:57 AM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,244,373 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I agree with Kathryn.

Even if I was a billionaire, I would not choose to live in a big city/metro like NYC or LA. Even Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Philly, etc. are too big for me. I guess the one thing I like about living in Fairfield County is that it's not part of the NYC metro!
Then you better move, because Fairfield County is part of the NYC metro. It's been part of the NYC metro for nearly a half-century now.

How could someone living in Fairfield County not know that they were in the NYC area? Your entire economy is integrated with the region; you are less than an hour from Grand Central, your biggest industry is Wall Street, you're on the busiest suburban rail line into Manhattan, your county residents mostly work in Manhattan or Stamford, and the most famous wealthy suburb of NYC is in Fairfield County.

You didn't know any of this??
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Old 12-28-2014, 12:03 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,244,373 times
Reputation: 9846
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
Wouldn't the fact that the cost of living is lower in the south make it more desirable to the average American which would make the southeast more desirable overall?
Is this a serious question??

Is a Tata more desirable than a Lamborghini because it's cheaper? Is the dollar store more desirable than Chanel or Hermes because it's cheaper? Of course not; the relative price reflects the relative demand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
I don't view that as making those areas more desirable then other parts of the country. I view it as rich people segregating themselves from average people.
Uh-huh. According to you, rich people don't live where they want to live, rather the are forced to live next to other rich people, just because. They all want to live in Arkansas and Mississippi, but are forced by social protocols to live in Beverly Hills, the Hamptons, and Manhattan.
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