U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-25-2014, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,121,705 times
Reputation: 7075

Advertisements

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/up...abt=0002&abg=1

"The Southeast has replaced California as the place where many people now go to find the American dream."

The article states that holiday travel patterns have shifted such that most people now travel from the Southeast to California or the Northeast. In the past, it was the other way around.

The article cites that the main reason is cost of living and/or warm climate. It also mentions that the politics of the South are becoming more liberal as a result.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-25-2014, 10:55 PM
 
12,660 posts, read 10,501,376 times
Reputation: 17562
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/up...abt=0002&abg=1

"The Southeast has replaced California as the place where many people now go to find the American dream."

The article states that holiday travel patterns have shifted such that most people now travel from the Southeast to California or the Northeast. In the past, it was the other way around.

The article cites that the main reason is cost of living and/or warm climate. It also mentions that the politics of the South are becoming more liberal as a result.
You could call it warm weather or you could call it stifling feel like you can't breathe sticky muggy buggy summer humidity.

I'm fine where I am. A little snow doesn't bother me.

You can achieve the American dream anywhere if you try, know what you're doing, and have a little help and support along the way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-25-2014, 11:02 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,250,419 times
Reputation: 9846
Ironic because the lowest social mobility is in the South. Basically the average person has the least chance at the American dream in the fastest growing states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,346,585 times
Reputation: 970
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
You could call it warm weather or you could call it stifling feel like you can't breathe sticky muggy buggy summer humidity.

I'm fine where I am. A little snow doesn't bother me.

You can achieve the American dream anywhere if you try, know what you're doing, and have a little help and support along the way.
Nailed it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 08:50 AM
 
56,609 posts, read 80,890,793 times
Reputation: 12505
Quote:
Originally Posted by NOLA101 View Post
Ironic because the lowest social mobility is in the South. Basically the average person has the least chance at the American dream in the fastest growing states.
This article states that point: http://nytimes.com/2013/07/22/busine...nted=all&_r=0&
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Pure Michigan!
4,347 posts, read 7,423,145 times
Reputation: 6783
Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/up...abt=0002&abg=1

"The Southeast has replaced California as the place where many people now go to find the American dream."

The article states that holiday travel patterns have shifted such that most people now travel from the Southeast to California or the Northeast. In the past, it was the other way around.

The article cites that the main reason is cost of living and/or warm climate. It also mentions that the politics of the South are becoming more liberal as a result.
LOL, don't count on it.

There's news, and then there's what organizations like the NY Times want you to believe because they want to believe it. If anything, the traditionally blue states, apart from those on the Coasts, are becoming more conservative. The Southeast will remain deeply red for many years to come.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 09:20 AM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,832 posts, read 21,140,229 times
Reputation: 9419
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
LOL, don't count on it.

There's news, and then there's what organizations like the NY Times want you to believe because they want to believe it. If anything, the traditionally blue states, apart from those on the Coasts, are becoming more conservative. The Southeast will remain deeply red for many years to come.
Virginia was a solid Red State and is now a slight Blue State.
North Carolina went for Obama in 2008 and he only lost GA by 1%

Here in KY the two most populous counties (Jefferson and Fayette) used to be evenly split in presidential elections but now go democrat by large margins. Until 2006 the congressional district which shadows Jefferson Co was held by a moderate Republican ever since it's been held by far left Democrat. Republicans winning that seat now would be unthinkable.

The South is also the most racially diverse region with several states at or near Minority Majority Status. That alone means it will never be a lost cause for Democrats
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 09:25 AM
 
29,937 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18470
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
LOL, don't count on it.

There's news, and then there's what organizations like the NY Times want you to believe because they want to believe it. If anything, the traditionally blue states, apart from those on the Coasts, are becoming more conservative. The Southeast will remain deeply red for many years to come.
The entire South isn't monolithic in this regard, but it's true to one extent or another in the states receiving the most migrants. FL and VA are swing states, as is NC to a lesser degree. GA is trending in that direction, and while it will take a little longer for TX to get there, it will happen eventually.

Truth be told, many transplants to the South are more libertarian than anything. Many vote Republican due to fiscal issues, but they are socially moderate or liberal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Ohio, USA
1,085 posts, read 1,346,585 times
Reputation: 970
Quote:
Originally Posted by canudigit View Post
LOL, don't count on it.

There's news, and then there's what organizations like the NY Times want you to believe because they want to believe it. If anything, the traditionally blue states, apart from those on the Coasts, are becoming more conservative. The Southeast will remain deeply red for many years to come.
Virginia, Florida, Iowa, Ohio, Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico voted for Bush in 2004 but voted for Obama in 2008 and 2012.

Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Illinois stayed blue states in 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012.

Only Indiana and North Carolina went back to being red in 2012 after voting blue in 2008.

You're right that states like Mississippi and Alabama are going to stay red for a very long time though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-26-2014, 10:04 AM
 
29,937 posts, read 27,365,450 times
Reputation: 18470
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The post only proves that liberal policies don't work. People escaping the blue cities for more affordable cities. Ironically, they get to the new cities and change the places into the same liberal messes they left behind. Everybody hates red but that is where they move to.
It's simple supply/demand at work. More populated areas are more desirable and thus they are more expensive. The COL is slowly creeping up in the more desirable parts of the South, although the cities that aren't geographically constrained can keep sprawling outward and keep housing costs down, although there are trade-offs in other areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top