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Old 08-05-2015, 09:48 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
I'm used to the long drawls in Central and Eastern NC, but I've heard Western NC accents are more like Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas.

Is Joplin, MO kinda like Oklahoma/Arkansas or more Midwestern?
I didn't know NC had varied accents among non-transplants. That's cool to learn that some North Carolinians twang like Okies, Arkies, and Texans.

I would say Joplin is probably right there at the crossroads. It would be interesting to see what people from Joplin self-identify as.

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 08-05-2015 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 08-05-2015, 10:00 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,270,484 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
I did 't know NC had varied accents among non-transplants. That's cool to learn that some North Carolinians twang like Okies, Arkies, an Texans.

I would say Joplin is probably right there at the crossroads. It would be interesting to see what people from Joplin self-identify as.
Yep! Eastern NC is practically Deep South, I feel like the drawls are the longest over there (south and east of Raleigh, basically). The further west you go, the more twangy accents become. Western NC and Eastern TN accents, from what I've heard, sound like many Texas/Arkansas/Oklahoma accents. Even in transplant saturated Raleigh/Durham and Charlotte, you'd be surprised that thicker accents aren't completely wiped out in these areas. Younger generations are sounding more neutral, though (which is the case in most southern metros).

Joplin being at the crossroads makes sense.
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Old 08-06-2015, 01:19 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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In my region I see it this way: from Columbus Indiana north it is 100% Midwest. From around Mammoth Cave southward is 100% Southern. In between is a transition zone.
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Ca2Mo2Ga2Va!
2,736 posts, read 5,953,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Your curvy line is bogus. Allow me to count the ways.




Big. ****ing. Deal.

I've seen more than one Confederate flag flying in California. These days you'll find that flag anywhere you have poor or working-class white people, regardless of which region of the country they live in.
this cracks me up, confed flags flying in california (i'm a native californian)...what a bunch of nincompoops lol....here in my part of virginia, you always see confed flags, on vehicles, houses, memorials, it's normal but with all the confed flag flack, you now see way more "don't tread on me" flags being waved.
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Old 08-07-2015, 10:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by breeze823 View Post
this cracks me up, confed flags flying in california (i'm a native californian)...what a bunch of nincompoops lol....here in my part of virginia, you always see confed flags, on vehicles, houses, memorials, it's normal but with all the confed flag flack, you now see way more "don't tread on me" flags being waved.
Virginia's southerness is underrated, that's the "original South" right there. Much more southern than "frontier areas" like Texas or Oklahoma. Even way up in Northern Virginia outside DC, there's a Confederate flag you can easily see right off I-95. The home state of Robert E. Lee, do I need to say more?
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Old 08-07-2015, 11:28 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
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I've seen quite a bit about West Virginia through this thread. The northern portions of WV are much more like the inland northeast than the Midwest honestly.

Even the eastern extremes of Ohio strike me as more like western PA/NY than Indiana. It stands to reason as east Ohio has its major cultural connections to northern Appalachia which is largely in the non-New England northeast (NY is not a New England state, fyi).

West of that the transition from north to south is very blurry. I tend to look at it as the state borders form a hard line between what is northern and what is southern along the Ohio river; but both sides have immense cultural influence on one-another. For example, Middletown Ohio is solidly in the north but even there you can find southern flavor in some of its residents via Kentucky. Florence Kentucky is roughly the same story in the other direction.

A place can be a lot like a neighbor without actually being a part of that neighbors region/country/whatever. Look at southern Ontario; it is very much like the great-lakes US states in many ways but it's still Canada.

I suppose a closer-to-home example would be northern Virginia. It is a lot like the northeast but it is definitely part of the south. I will never personally understand people in and from the Midwest who claim to actually be southerners.

I do, however, think there are a couple of major exceptions to that still where it does make a lot of sense despite state borders. Places like extreme southern Illinois and southern Missouri. In the same way that Maryland has pretty solidly folded into the north I think these small mid-western areas are definitely able to claim southern.

I am rambling so I'll stop before I get even more confusing.
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Old 02-17-2018, 06:27 PM
 
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In Missouri, I would say that State Highway 52 is a good dividing line between The Midwest and the transition zone. Then from there by the time you get to US 60 you have hit The South
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Old 02-17-2018, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
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Here in Kansas City, it's kinda weird. You can have people with a bit of a southern twang living right next to people with no accent at all (except, of course, a standard American accent). And they both grew up in those same houses and went to the same school! The southern state I'm most familiar with is North Carolina, and North Carolina is definitely more "Southern" than around here, but around here is definitely more southern than, say, Chicago.

If anything, around here the divide is east-west: Most of the people I've encountered with a bit of a southern twang seem to be from the Missouri side. On the Kansas side I rarely run into them at all.
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Old 02-18-2018, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,099 posts, read 4,737,517 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Here in Kansas City, it's kinda weird. You can have people with a bit of a southern twang living right next to people with no accent at all (except, of course, a standard American accent). And they both grew up in those same houses and went to the same school! The southern state I'm most familiar with is North Carolina, and North Carolina is definitely more "Southern" than around here, but around here is definitely more southern than, say, Chicago.

If anything, around here the divide is east-west: Most of the people I've encountered with a bit of a southern twang seem to be from the Missouri side. On the Kansas side I rarely run into them at all.
You tend to get that around any state that sits near or in both halves, I've noticed.

Even Pennsylvania, which debatably doesn't truly touch the south, has some cases of unusually southern sounding local accents (especially south of Altoona, in my experience).

Likewise, I've heard people from the upper south who sound like they came out of Michigan, or even western NY. My old friend from Kentucky was born and raised in the eastern part of the state. His whole family sounds very typical of south/central Appalachia. Except for him. He sounds entirely northern, but he's never lived a day outside of eastern KY.

Then you have some real outliers. Such as one of the true New Orleans accents, which is strikingly similar to Brooklyn, NY. And then there are pockets in upstate NY where I live wherein people very nearly sound plucked out of the south.

I think, perhaps, accents have been changing and morphing ever since the USA was established. It's only due to our recent technology that we've noticed a ton of oddities.
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Old 02-19-2018, 02:25 PM
 
Location: New Mexico
6,575 posts, read 3,667,513 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by James Bond 007 View Post
Here in Kansas City, it's kinda weird. You can have people with a bit of a southern twang living right next to people with no accent at all (except, of course, a standard American accent). And they both grew up in those same houses and went to the same school! The southern state I'm most familiar with is North Carolina, and North Carolina is definitely more "Southern" than around here, but around here is definitely more southern than, say, Chicago.

If anything, around here the divide is east-west: Most of the people I've encountered with a bit of a southern twang seem to be from the Missouri side. On the Kansas side I rarely run into them at all.
I think that Missouri places like Ray County and Lafayette County are Southern outposts or enclaves in a midwestern area north of the transitional zone. Thatís part of Little Dixie. As those folks move into Kansas City they introduce a little southern-ness in an otherwise midwestern city. There are probably balancing influences coming out of Kansas. There are some northern outposts farther south. The largely German communities around Cole Camp and sprinkled eastward toward Perry County and the Old Lutheran colonies are not really Southern or even very transitional.

Joplin is an odd duck because it was in a mining district and had some immigrant influences besides the southern and nearby Oklahoma influences. Iíve known people from nearby Carthage who seemed more Southern than folks from Joplin...just a few miles away. Ozark/Southern kicks in to the east and south.
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