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Old 12-30-2014, 09:42 AM
 
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I don't have time to look it up
but read some about the 1820 Missouri compromise, the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska compromise and I remember something in school about Missouri at some point during that time being 1/2 Union and 1/2 Southern.
All of that is the reason why it feels like you are entering the South around that area.


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Old 12-30-2014, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
774 posts, read 841,779 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
I don't have time to look it up
but read some about the 1820 Missouri compromise, the 1854 Kansas-Nebraska compromise and I remember something in school about Missouri at some point during that time being 1/2 Union and 1/2 Southern.
All of that is the reason why it feels like you are entering the South around that area.

I-35 is interesting to compare as some people say that west of that interstate the transition to the West begins, though I would use US 281 as the dividing line as where the Western influence really starts to develop. A town like Alva, OK seems to be in a no-man's land between the Midwest, South, and West, though by and large it is Great Plains. Generally speaking though in terms of highways though, US 60 is the best dividing line from Lousiville on westward, with a few exceptions such as around the Mississippi with some Delta South influences. East of there, US 50 serves as a better dividing line, even in Norther Virginia/DC/Maryland as immediately south of those developed areas, the culture is undisputably southern, while more rural Northern/Central MD/Delaware/Northern WV tends to look north for their big cities (Pittsburgh/Baltimore/Philadelphia).

And except for Western Tennessee which is more Deep South, the rest of the state, especially East Tennessee, is Upper. And when did Mississippi become Michigan in that map?
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Old 12-30-2014, 10:21 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Francois View Post
I would agree with a lot of that, but I think most of Tennessee is more "Deep" than "Upper". In states like TN, NC, and SC, it's more a rural/urban thing than a nice dividing line.
I disagree. I'd consider for the most part, much of Tennessee's culture to be similar to Kentucky's culture. Much more like Kentucky than most of Georgia or Alabama for example, save for the northern areas of those two states.
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Old 12-30-2014, 10:34 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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West Tennessee is definitely deep south. Middle & Eastern TN not so much.
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Old 12-30-2014, 11:24 AM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Francois View Post
I would agree with a lot of that, but I think most of Tennessee is more "Deep" than "Upper". In states like TN, NC, and SC, it's more a rural/urban thing than a nice dividing line.
I generally don't like using the term "upper South" because it's too vague. I prefer to label Tennessee as part of the mid-South, which is whiter and has less of an "Old Dixie" vibe than the deep South. Tennessee was settled not only by Virginians and Carolinians, but Pennsylvanians as well, which watered down the Southern influence somewhat. (This is part of why I say that Tennessee is Pennsylvania's Southern cousin, and might also explain why Tennessee was the last state to join the Confederacy during the Civil War.) The mid-South outside of the Mississippi Embayment never had slavery or a plantation economy to the degree that the deep South did, so it remained whiter, relatively speaking, and its culture was more along the lines of "hillbillies" than "belles, beaus and blacks," so to speak.
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:50 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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I was lived in Florence KY until age 4 but my parents were from far Southern and Southeast KY. The "Y'all" sign is due to a legal matter. It is right by a mall and read "Florence Mall". That was deemed private advertising on a public building so the M became a Y. I view anything in urban NKY, as far south as Walton, is very Midwestern. It gets more Southern south of there and by the time you hit Georgetown you're definitely in the Mid South. By the time you get to Berea you need a translator so the Cincinnatian can understand Appalachian English

Around Louisville the change is very gradual. The city itself is a complete blending of Mid South and Midwest. Even the Indiana side is complicated. So many people moved from rural KY to Southern Indiana for cheaper housing near the city that probably half of people in Indiana side of the metro are from KY or their parents area. The native Hoosiers have a bit of a Midwestern accent but they're very country as well. North of Scottsburg you start getting out of the KY influences.

Oddly I've found Evansville IN, which is right on the Ohio River, to be much more Midwestern feeling than the parts of IN 30 miles north of the river
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Old 12-30-2014, 02:59 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CurlyFries View Post
Interstate 70
Hell no! The Ohio River (at least in Indiana) is the border between the Midwest and the South. Everything between I-70 and the Ohio maybe the borderlands.
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Old 12-30-2014, 03:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
I was lived in Florence KY until age 4 but my parents were from far Southern and Southeast KY. The "Y'all" sign is due to a legal matter. It is right by a mall and read "Florence Mall". That was deemed private advertising on a public building so the M became a Y. I view anything in urban NKY, as far south as Walton, is very Midwestern. It gets more Southern south of there and by the time you hit Georgetown you're definitely in the Mid South. By the time you get to Berea you need a translator so the Cincinnatian can understand Appalachian English

Around Louisville the change is very gradual. The city itself is a complete blending of Mid South and Midwest. Even the Indiana side is complicated. So many people moved from rural KY to Southern Indiana for cheaper housing near the city that probably half of people in Indiana side of the metro are from KY or their parents area. The native Hoosiers have a bit of a Midwestern accent but they're very country as well. North of Scottsburg you start getting out of the KY influences.

Oddly I've found Evansville IN, which is right on the Ohio River, to be much more Midwestern feeling than the parts of IN 30 miles north of the river
I'm not trying to argue. I'm from Terre Haute and every time I'm in Evansville I'm asking myself "am I still in Indiana"? They sell a lot of UK shirts down there.
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Old 12-30-2014, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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It's hard to say. Parts of Southern Indiana feel more Southern than parts of Northern Kentucky.
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Old 12-30-2014, 03:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
It's hard to say. Parts of Southern Indiana feel more Southern than parts of Northern Kentucky.
What are we considering "Southern Indiana"? I would say the the break off is Indiana 46 which runs between Columbus, Bloomington and Terre Haute.
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