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Old 12-30-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,713 posts, read 36,132,256 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricOldTime View Post
Here's my map....

The border between the upper and "lower" or deep south..
This makes sense to me.
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Old 12-30-2014, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Iowa, Heartland of Murica
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Thanks for all your responses, some great information Would you guys consider Southern Illinois(Carbondale area) and Southeast Missouri(Cape Girardeau area) to be more like the South culturally or still Midwest?
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Old 12-30-2014, 06:03 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
I generally don't like using the term "upper South" because it's too vague. I prefer to label Tennessee as part of the mid-South, which is whiter and has less of an "Old Dixie" vibe than the deep South. Tennessee was settled not only by Virginians and Carolinians, but Pennsylvanians as well, which watered down the Southern influence somewhat. (This is part of why I say that Tennessee is Pennsylvania's Southern cousin, and might also explain why Tennessee was the last state to join the Confederacy during the Civil War.) The mid-South outside of the Mississippi Embayment never had slavery or a plantation economy to the degree that the deep South did, so it remained whiter, relatively speaking, and its culture was more along the lines of "hillbillies" than "belles, beaus and blacks," so to speak.
Meh, TN itself is pretty divided. Memphis and parts of western TN have a lot more in common with MS and the deep south than they do with the rest of TN. Memphis isn't jokingly referred to as the capitol of MS for no reason.
The Memphis area refers to itself as being in the midsouth, but I don't ever hear the same thing said here in east TN.
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Old 12-30-2014, 06:10 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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I don't see a big enough difference between the two regions to draw a border.
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Old 12-30-2014, 06:33 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Repubocrat View Post
Thanks for all your responses, some great information Would you guys consider Southern Illinois(Carbondale area) and Southeast Missouri(Cape Girardeau area) to be more like the South culturally or still Midwest?
Illinois is southern for the last 30 miles as you approach the Ohio River. I grew up near Cape Girardeau and it is kind of like Louisville KY in that people who are culturally midwestern and culturally southern live right around each other. People who are of German descent are typically still Catholic or Lutheran and eat foods that I still haven't heard of. They are midwestern. My family is primarily Scots-Irish ancestry and Pentecostal & Baptist and I have always felt more at home in the south than the midwest. Certain parts of the county lean one way or another.

I'd say Carbondale is midwestern while Cape is a mix of the two. The cultural border on the Missouri line is very sharp. There is a huge night and day difference between Perryville & Sikeston, which are only about 60 miles apart. Cape Girardeau is more like Sikeston than Perryville, but not by much.

Last edited by GunnerTHB; 12-30-2014 at 06:55 PM..
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Old 12-30-2014, 10:13 PM
 
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For what it is worth, a friend of mine who lives in Kentucky works with a guy from Alabama who considers western Kentucky part of the Midwest, not the south.
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Old 12-30-2014, 10:33 PM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjb122982 View Post
For what it is worth, a friend of mine who lives in Kentucky works with a guy from Alabama who considers western Kentucky part of the Midwest, not the south.
If I had to guess, I would say the guy from Alabama is living east of Kentucky Lake, because west of Kentucky lake is the most southern part of the state culturally with the possible exception of parts of eastern Kentucky.
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Old 12-31-2014, 08:29 AM
 
1,394 posts, read 1,730,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerTHB View Post
If I had to guess, I would say the guy from Alabama is living east of Kentucky Lake, because west of Kentucky lake is the most southern part of the state culturally with the possible exception of parts of eastern Kentucky.
First off, I'd say from about Mt Vernon Illinois is where the border between the lower-midwest and upper south begins to give away from one ot the other, gaining in intensity rapidly as you approach the Ohio river.

defining "southern culture" is kind of difficult, because it applies alot of different aspects. Some folks have a very narrowminded view of what dictates southern culture and some a broader view.

Kentucky is very much so a southern state. It's not deep southern in the sense of Lower Alabama or Georgia, but that's not where the south begins either. Kentucky is located on the south's northern fringes, even so Kentucky kinda has it's own culture in many ways. I'd still define it as generally southern in nature, but it's also unique to Kentucky in many ways.
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Old 12-31-2014, 08:36 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricOldTime View Post
First off, I'd say from about Mt Vernon Illinois is where the border between the lower-midwest and upper south begins to give away from one ot the other, gaining in intensity rapidly as you approach the Ohio river.

defining "southern culture" is kind of difficult, because it applies alot of different aspects. Some folks have a very narrowminded view of what dictates southern culture and some a broader view.

Kentucky is very much so a southern state. It's not deep southern in the sense of Lower Alabama or Georgia, but that's not where the south begins either. Kentucky is located on the south's northern fringes, even so Kentucky kinda has it's own culture in many ways. I'd still define it as generally southern in nature, but it's also unique to Kentucky in many ways.
Yeah I agree. The only deep south part of Kentucky that I can think of would be Fulton County in the far southwest part of the state.
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Old 12-31-2014, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
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For me here in Windsor, the south begins after a 5 hour drive down the i 75 to northern Kentucky, just south of the Cincinatti Metro area. We used to drive south to Florida and East Tennessee growing up for vacations, and once we crossed over the Ohio River and took a rest break for lunch, the southern accents and feel were very noticeable in many of the restaurants we stopped at. It's pretty amazing that someone living in Canada could be in the south after only a 5 hour drive! Being Canada's southern most city does have its benifits!
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