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View Poll Results: Do you use winter tires?
Yes 20 30.30%
No 37 56.06%
We don't get snow here 9 13.64%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-11-2015, 12:55 PM
 
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I put chains on but I plow and tow.
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Old 01-11-2015, 01:11 PM
Status: "0-0-2 start!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,290 posts, read 15,342,559 times
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I like people from one region speaking for all places it snows ever - I live in the Pacific Northwest and when I lived in the Portland area and on the snowy east side of the Cascades I had winter tires, specifically ice-and-snow rated "traction" tires that I put on one car. Why? Because of "hills" (like 6,000' passes which could be poorly plowed in the winter and go through multiple thaw/refreeze cycles), because of ice, bad or non-existent plowing, wet slushy snow and a variety of other reasons. We don't get the nicely packed snow, we don't salt the roads and we tend to get icy skating rinks which all-season tires are terrible in.

So, sure, I had winter tires that I put on when the forecast looked like they might be necessary (and then took off so I wasn't driving on dry road with them). I sold them last year when I moved where they weren't needed.
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Old 01-12-2015, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,878 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
It is weird that so many people who don't live in the upper Midwest want to argue about this, as if they know more about what people do here than we do. Generally speaking people in this part of the country do not use snow tires. I have never heard anyone talk about how they had to get their tires changed because winter is coming. We don't do it to brag, or so we can imagine that we are bad asses, but because we don't really see the point of it. The sunk costs plus the hassle of having your tires changed plus having to find a place to store the second set don't seem to be worth it. People who live in warmer areas can't seem to wrap their heads around that fact.

If I lived in the mountains of the west I would definitely have snow tires because I don't want to drive off a cliff and die, but otherwise they seem like they are just a car guy type of thing. Normal people don't have them. I think a lot of people on the west coast think snow tires are a normal part of winter driving because most of their experience of driving in the snow is in the mountains where it is actually a good idea to have them.

Here is a reference point from the Minnesota forum:

Do you switch to snow tires for the Winter?

The poll is at 19 to 2 in favor of not changing tires.
Right - if you live in a foreign country that madates it, SNOW TIRES. If you live in a rural mountain area, SNOW TIRES. If you plow commercially, maybe snow tires but the people I know who do it do not use them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
this coming from someone who advocates...

all public roads in snow areas to be heated....(including neighborhood roads) in major cities

http://www.city-data.com/forum/37864808-post1.html
I actually laughed out loud on that one...this is what we're dealing with. People who actually live in snowy areas vs people who have ZERO understanding of driving in snowy areas (100% proven by the "heated roads" comment) arguing for the sake of arguing.

Snow tires don't do crap when roads are icy, and icy roads are the problem in terms of accidents, NOT snowy roads! Same with all the fools in trucks speeding by during blizzards that you see in the ditch a few miles later - your 4 wheel drive is useless when you hit a patch of black ice too fast.
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Old 01-12-2015, 11:14 AM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,524,043 times
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I live in Denver. Yeah it snows a bit here. So I do know what I'm talking about in regards to snow. I also went to UW-Madison (class of '94) so have lived in the midwest. And yes, I have seen cars with snow tires in both regions (unless of course people stopped buying snow tires altogether in those regions after 1994?)

I'm just arguing your contention that NO ONE in the midwest or other regions ever puts on or purchases snow tires.

I don't deal in absolutes. Descriptions such as NEVER/ALWAYS is usually a flawed statement. Now if you had used MANY or MOST I would understand but to flat out say NO ONE EVER uses snow tires in those regions is plain out WRONG!

And yes, they are called snow tires because they help out in snow not ice. Thus the reason they're called SNOW TIRES and not ICE TIRES. Add studs to them and you will increase your grip in ICE but at the expense of gas mileage and increase road damage. Thus the reason why studded tires are prohibited in many regions (although not in Colorado). But this discussion was about snow tires in snow areas.

That's all. Have a good day.
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Old 01-12-2015, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,395,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IShootNikon View Post
I live in Denver. Yeah it snows a bit here. So I do know what I'm talking about in regards to snow. I also went to UW-Madison (class of '94) so have lived in the midwest. And yes, I have seen cars with snow tires in both regions (unless of course people stopped buying snow tires altogether in those regions after 1994?)

I'm just arguing your contention that NO ONE in the midwest or other regions ever puts on or purchases snow tires.

I don't deal in absolutes. Descriptions such as NEVER/ALWAYS is usually a flawed statement. Now if you had used MANY or MOST I would understand but to flat out say NO ONE EVER uses snow tires in those regions is plain out WRONG!

And yes, they are called snow tires because they help out in snow not ice. Thus the reason they're called SNOW TIRES and not ICE TIRES. Add studs to them and you will increase your grip in ICE but at the expense of gas mileage and increase road damage. Thus the reason why studded tires are prohibited in many regions (although not in Colorado). But this discussion was about snow tires in snow areas.

That's all. Have a good day.
I said that snow tires help with snow which is NOT the problem when it comes to accidents, it's ICE which snow tires DO NOT HELP WITH. Next time, actually read what I wrote before responding - thanks in advance!

No one I know, out of hundreds/thousands of people, has used snow tires for decades. This is a fact. No American on this thread, which attracts a cross section of people from throughout the country, has said they they themselves use snow tires outside of rural alpine conditions. NOT. ONE. PERSON. Why do you think that is? And quit hiding behind semantics - you're just being pedantic.
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,257 posts, read 26,226,229 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I said that snow tires help with snow which is NOT the problem when it comes to accidents, it's ICE which snow tires DO NOT HELP WITH.
Huh? Winter tires are designed to bite into ice. Since this isn't a car specific forum (a lot of people on C-D detest cars anyway), I'll let this slide.

Quote:
Shelled micro-bubbles in the IceGuard tire are small bubbles in the rubber that break open as they come in contact with the road surface. The bubble space creates suction that sucks up water off any ice on the road. A film of water on the ice makes it extremely slippery. For example, take an ice cube from the freezer and it can be held easily, but as it starts to melt, the water film makes it slipperier. The pressure of a tire can cause water to form on ice even when the temperatures are far below freezing. By removing the water film, the rubber can grip the ice layer. Water has the same effect on the road. As the tire rotates, the water drains from the bubbles and new bubbles are exposed as the tread wears.
Auto Tech: The science behind winter tires - Autos.ca


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqvS0gOemr0
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,053,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IShootNikon View Post
I live in Denver. Yeah it snows a bit here. So I do know what I'm talking about in regards to snow. I also went to UW-Madison (class of '94) so have lived in the midwest. And yes, I have seen cars with snow tires in both regions (unless of course people stopped buying snow tires altogether in those regions after 1994?)

I'm just arguing your contention that NO ONE in the midwest or other regions ever puts on or purchases snow tires.

I don't deal in absolutes. Descriptions such as NEVER/ALWAYS is usually a flawed statement. Now if you had used MANY or MOST I would understand but to flat out say NO ONE EVER uses snow tires in those regions is plain out WRONG!
It isn't that nobody buys winter tires, just that very few people do. And the bolded part explains why you think what you think. The use of winter tires has been dying out over the last 20 years as all season tires have become better and as rear wheel drive has become rare. When I started driving in upstate NY in the mid '80s winter tires were still somewhat common, now very few people there or in the upper Midwest use them. They are probably more common in Denver because it is next to the mountains. Nearly everybody agrees that if you are driving in winter conditions in mountainous regions they are useful.
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:29 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,524,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I said that snow tires help with snow which is NOT the problem when it comes to accidents, it's ICE which snow tires DO NOT HELP WITH. Next time, actually read what I wrote before responding - thanks in advance!

No one I know, out of hundreds/thousands of people, has used snow tires for decades. This is a fact. No American on this thread, which attracts a cross section of people from throughout the country, has said they they themselves use snow tires outside of rural alpine conditions. NOT. ONE. PERSON. Why do you think that is? And quit hiding behind semantics - you're just being pedantic.
Are you really using the posts/stats from this singular thread to make your point that NO ONE uses snow tires in urban midwest snow regions in the US? Is that right? Just want to be clear here. We're not talking about Florida here. We are talking MN, WI, etc. Just want to be sure I'm hearing you right that NO ONE in the urban ares of these states/regions have NEVER purchased and/or NEVER put on snow tires? EVER???? You sure about that??

Just answer this: If NO ONE (empasis) uses snow tires in midwest urban snow regions then how come local tire shops in those cities stock snow tires. Is it for shXX and giggles?

Just a quick check of local Discount Tire shops in and around Twin Cities. These are just for one size (225/40/18) and one brand (GT Radial Winterpro)

Looks like plenty of shops have these in stock, even this late into the winter season (I say late as they only produce enough for one season usually. Many people get their snow tires towards Oct-Dec)
http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/che...NMINT&pc=17015
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:31 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,524,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
It isn't that nobody buys winter tires, just that very few people do. And the bolded part explains why you think what you think. The use of winter tires has been dying out over the last 20 years as all season tires have become better and as rear wheel drive has become rare. When I started driving in upstate NY in the mid '80s winter tires were still somewhat common, now very few people there or in the upper Midwest use them. They are probably more common in Denver because it is next to the mountains. Nearly everybody agrees that if you are driving in winter conditions in mountainous regions they are useful.
There is a difference between NONE and VERY FEW. Cheese Plate has stated many times that NO ONE buys them. I understand in some regions very few people buy them but to state that NO ONE stocks them is erroneous
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Old 01-12-2015, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,053,426 times
Reputation: 3925
You seem to be really hung up on the term no one. The numbers are probably no higher than 5% and maybe closer to 2%, which isn't nobody, but it is a very, very small number.
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