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View Poll Results: Do you use winter tires?
Yes 20 30.30%
No 37 56.06%
We don't get snow here 9 13.64%
Voters: 66. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-07-2015, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2895

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I'm done "debating" this, as it's quite clear that the only people who switch out to snow tires are ones who are in foreign countries where it's mandated and people who have to deal with extreme rural alpine conditions. Oh, and if you have a "performance vehicle" with low profile tires.

No one I know, and no one from the snowiest regions of the country on this thread has stated that they swap out their tires for snow tires. I haven't seen a single person do it since the '70s, and I grew up in northern WI along Lake Michigan. The question here was whether you use snow tires, and very strangely there were 10 "yes" answers right off, and not a single "yes" answer in the days since I noted the ridiculousness of that. Get over it, people - in the snowiest regions of the country, and this is a FACT, swapping out snow tires is so rare as to be practically unknown. My guess is that more than 99% of people in the snowy Upper Midwest states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan do NOT use snow tires. So if you guys want to argue statistical anomalies or use marketing material generated by the auto industry to make your "point," have at it. Let's just be clear here: you are arguing unsuccessfully with people who actually live in the snowiest areas in the country, and they disagree wtih you.
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Old 01-07-2015, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,085 posts, read 1,068,704 times
Reputation: 1933
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
Riding on summer tires during the winter is an obvious death wish. The issue here boils down to the age old debate between all season and winter tires.

The decision to get winter tires, I think, comes down to how much it snows where you live and how often you drive. I have the option to leave my car on the street and use public transit so there's no compelling reason to have dedicated season tires. If it snows, I don't drive. Simple. Plus, we don't get that much snow. If I lived in a sprawled out, car dependent suburb in Michigan or Wisconsin where I literally had to drive everywhere to do anything, and there was consistent snowfall on top of that, I would have winter tires on in a heartbeat. For me, it would be a no brainer.
As would I, for sure.


The only reason I brought up summer tires and type of car is that some people on the thread aren't debating the effectiveness of winter tires, but rather asserting that no one buys them in their snowy area. So I'm not sure that some folks on this thread know that some people put summer tires on their cars, which as you said would certainly be a death wish to take out in the winter. Summer tire owners buy winter tires, or don't take the cars out.
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Old 01-07-2015, 01:47 PM
 
4,445 posts, read 3,520,811 times
Reputation: 5304
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I'm done "debating" this, as it's quite clear that the only people who switch out to snow tires are ones who are in foreign countries where it's mandated and people who have to deal with extreme rural alpine conditions. Oh, and if you have a "performance vehicle" with low profile tires.

No one I know, and no one from the snowiest regions of the country on this thread has stated that they swap out their tires for snow tires. I haven't seen a single person do it since the '70s, and I grew up in northern WI along Lake Michigan. The question here was whether you use snow tires, and very strangely there were 10 "yes" answers right off, and not a single "yes" answer in the days since I noted the ridiculousness of that. Get over it, people - in the snowiest regions of the country, and this is a FACT, swapping out snow tires is so rare as to be practically unknown. My guess is that more than 99% of people in the snowy Upper Midwest states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan do NOT use snow tires. So if you guys want to argue statistical anomalies or use marketing material generated by the auto industry to make your "point," have at it. Let's just be clear here: you are arguing unsuccessfully with people who actually live in the snowiest areas in the country, and they disagree wtih you.
Is that a guess in the sense of pull it out of your @ss or do you actually have some stats to back it up?
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Old 01-07-2015, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
1,085 posts, read 1,068,704 times
Reputation: 1933
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I'm done "debating" this, as it's quite clear that the only people who switch out to snow tires are ones who are in foreign countries where it's mandated and people who have to deal with extreme rural alpine conditions. Oh, and if you have a "performance vehicle" with low profile tires.

No one I know, and no one from the snowiest regions of the country on this thread has stated that they swap out their tires for snow tires. I haven't seen a single person do it since the '70s, and I grew up in northern WI along Lake Michigan. The question here was whether you use snow tires, and very strangely there were 10 "yes" answers right off, and not a single "yes" answer in the days since I noted the ridiculousness of that. Get over it, people - in the snowiest regions of the country, and this is a FACT, swapping out snow tires is so rare as to be practically unknown. My guess is that more than 99% of people in the snowy Upper Midwest states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan do NOT use snow tires. So if you guys want to argue statistical anomalies or use marketing material generated by the auto industry to make your "point," have at it. Let's just be clear here: you are arguing unsuccessfully with people who actually live in the snowiest areas in the country, and they disagree wtih you.
And I don't think you understand what "facts" are, or that City-Data is not an exact statistical representation of the world around you. Apparently you also don't think that sports cars actually exist, or that there is any advantage to driving on snow tires. My wife and I have lived in far snowier areas than you (Western CO and outside Erie, PA) and have regularly owned snow tires, so I'm happy to extol the virtues of them.

For the record, I believe you that most people around you don't buy them. But you're the only one arguing that NO ONE buys snow tires in your region, and apparently nothing can prove to you otherwise.

Have a nice day, and drive slowly.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
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I'd be curious to know how many of the 5 million winter tires sold annually in the Lower 48 states are sold in the Upper Midwest. My guess would be that a disproportionate percentage (90%) are sold there along with Western New York. I couldn't imagine too many winter tires are sold in metros at latitudes lower than Chicago's.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by IShootNikon View Post
Is that a guess in the sense of pull it out of your @ss or do you actually have some stats to back it up?
I said guess because it was a guess. And until YOU can back up your contention from far away that a substantial % of people in the Upper Midwest use snow tires (they don't, though - guaranteed), we'll just have to go with first-hand accounts of the people who live in the snowiest regions of the country. Which doesn't include you. Unless you can produce stats. Which you either will not be able to find, or you will find, and quickly discard because you'll see we're right.

Even with more people on the road and nearly everyone using all-weather tires, Wisconsin totalled its lowest road deaths since WWII, which counters all the "hey man, if you guys up there want to drive daaaangerously, then do it" BS: Wisconsin has fewest road deaths since 1943

Western NY is not the only area of the country with substantial snowfall, though it seems to be the only snowy place B.Y. is familiar with
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:40 PM
 
56,511 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
But that's basically what you're saying. It's not enough to say "You should drive at slower speeds anyway" because the Tire Rack tests show how much longer it takes for a vehicle to come to a complete stop under 20 mph (with all seasons). In your mind, 20 mph does not sound fast, but it is fast considering you need to bring a 4,000 pound vehicle to rest. As one poster wrote in a car specific forum:



And that's basically what it comes down to (and this is from a NOVA forum...hardly an arctic climate). And it's not only about your ability to handle snow, but also your ability to respond to drivers who can't handle snow. If a car in the lane next to you starts to fishtail and lose control, do you really want to be in all seasons?



There are no AS tires that perform "well" in those conditions. I don't care if they are PS3s, Potenzas, P Zeros, DWSs, Eagles, etc. They just don't and you'd get laughed out of any car forum for saying such non-sense.

"All" Season tires are really 3 season tires. If you're in Philly or the DC Metro area, you can easily get by with all seasons because snowdays are few and far between compared to the more northern reaches of the United States. If snow is on the ground a couple of times a week, then you'd be well advised to get some winter tires. There are over 5 million winter tires sold in the U.S. each year and my guess would be that the vast bulk of those are purchased in the Upper Midwest and mountainous areas. They're not buying them in Georgia.
No, that isn't what I'm saying and like I mentioned in other posts, there are going to be other factors to consider.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee
3,451 posts, read 3,394,206 times
Reputation: 2895
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post
I'd be curious to know how many of the 5 million winter tires sold annually in the Lower 48 states are sold in the Upper Midwest. My guess would be that a disproportionate percentage (90%) are sold there along with Western New York. I couldn't imagine too many winter tires are sold in metros at latitudes lower than Chicago's.
If that number is even correct, that would still be around 1% of the tires sold in the USA, and would include many state/county/city vehicles. Your average person in your average car or truck is not buying them, and the ones that do are part of a vast, vast...very vast minority.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
I said guess because it was a guess. And until YOU can back up your contention from far away that a substantial % of people in the Upper Midwest use snow tires (they don't, though - guaranteed), we'll just have to go with first-hand accounts of the people who live in the snowiest regions of the country.
Where did he make that claim? He's asking for support for a claim that you made. You said that 99% of the people in Upper Midwest don't switch tires and offered your experience as evidence. But we all know that the "everybody I know" argument is about the least credible evidence that can be offered, and yet that's the form of evidence most typically offered in these kinds of debates.
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,248 posts, read 26,214,003 times
Reputation: 11701
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheese plate View Post
If that number is even correct, that would still be around 1% of the tires sold in the USA, and would include many state/county/city vehicles. Your average person in your average car or truck is not buying them, and the ones that do are part of a vast, vast...very vast minority.
It's 2.3% of tires sold in the contiguous U.S. So one question is what percentage of the overall market in U.S. tire sales do Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota represent?
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