U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-23-2015, 10:38 AM
 
Location: At my house in my state
638 posts, read 711,682 times
Reputation: 666

Advertisements

I've noticed in pensacola florida a highly used slang word is "folk"

What's up folk

folk this folk that, used like the word "dude" and thrown in sentences left and right. I also notice that this is big among some Chicago areas. I am just wondering if you hear this word often among the slang? Does anyone know where it originated from?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-23-2015, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,522 posts, read 12,283,883 times
Reputation: 3827
Probably from the German word "volk" for people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,726 times
Reputation: 2168
Quote:
Originally Posted by scarecrow- View Post
I've noticed in pensacola florida a highly used slang word is "folk"

What's up folk

folk this folk that, used like the word "dude" and thrown in sentences left and right. I also notice that this is big among some Chicago areas. I am just wondering if you hear this word often among the slang? Does anyone know where it originated from?
It's not slang, it is an old English word for people.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 11:17 AM
 
Location: Germany
575 posts, read 408,063 times
Reputation: 695
Merriam-Webster:


Middle English, from Old English folc; akin to Old High German folc peopleFirst Known Use: before 12th century
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 11:23 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,363,867 times
Reputation: 10919
I hear old people say it in the Midwest a lot. My grandparents always used "folks" for people. They usually only used it in a jokingly way though, like talking about "us old folks". Lots of retirement homes were commonly referred to as "old folks homes".

When talking to someone and asking about their parents or if their parents give them permission people would always say "what are your folks up to?". "Do the folks care if you come?".

I normally associated it as the word "your parents" unless it was used in a term like old folks home, and then it was obviously just "people".

Say hi to your folks for me!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-23-2015, 11:57 AM
 
Location: USA
8,016 posts, read 9,478,371 times
Reputation: 3406
folklore I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2015, 09:24 AM
 
Location: USA
2,779 posts, read 6,683,825 times
Reputation: 1866
I always thought it sounded nice and more personal to call people "folks".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2015, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,637 posts, read 27,042,193 times
Reputation: 9577
It's used differently in the South as opposed to Chicago. In the South, it's just another word for people he knows, friends, or family. In Chicago, it's mostly used or known in relation to gangs. I instantly noticed the difference once I visited Chicago. It's not originally a slang word but was turned into one. I might by generalizing for Chicago though but that's what I observed when I was up there with my family.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2015, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,682 posts, read 36,118,702 times
Reputation: 63230
I am from the south. These types of comments are pretty common:

"Come on, folks, let's go." (come on, everyone)

"What did your folks get you for Christmas?" (parents)

"All my folks will be there." (big family gathering)

"The old folks will want some Elvis or Sinatra tunes at the reception." (elderly people)

"Wow, the mall was full of all sorts of folks!" (people in general)

The word comes from the German word "volk" meaning people. But I think the OP must be talking about some newish slang word, which I haven't heard because I am apparently very uncool.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-24-2015, 02:51 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,899,963 times
Reputation: 6423
FOLK

Folk is an old English word for people. It is related to the German word "volk", English being a Germanic language.

The word Folk has been around a long time, I am kind of surprised the OP finds it unusual. Some examples:

Folklore (good one 11kap)
Folk Songs
Folk Art
Folk Hero
Old Folks
Young Folks
Rich Folks
Poor Folks
Kinfolk
Country folk
Folktale
Norfolk (literally North people)
Suffolk (literally South people)

Folk Festivals List of folk festivals - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Florida
Philadelphia
Norfolk
Brooklyn
Montana
Cornwall
etc.


As you can see there are a lot of folks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top