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Old 02-11-2015, 04:24 PM
 
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-Even when countries such as Luxembourg, Switzerland or Norway have a greater GDP per capita?
(I'd specially like to hear from your own experiences)

-How much taxes (%) does the average American citizen/ resident ultimately pay? An example with an average, median or common wage or personal income will be appreciated.

You can also redirect me to another thread if this has been already asked.
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Old 02-11-2015, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
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Do you mean "discretionary"?

I guess a lot of Americans "dispose" of their incomes pretty quickly.
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Old 02-11-2015, 05:13 PM
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Most Americans hardly have any disposable income. Our taxes might be low compared to those countries or places like Australia, but it's not like our wages are as high.
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Old 02-11-2015, 05:15 PM
 
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Yes, because although our taxes are annoying, they're not soul-consuming like those in most of Western Europe (places like Monaco being exceptions).
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Old 02-11-2015, 05:43 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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If by disposable income you mean we work hard and the government takes it and wastes it, then yes we have the most disposable income!
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Old 02-11-2015, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Yes, it really does. That shouldn't be surprising. Our tax burden is way lower than most of Europe.
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Old 02-11-2015, 06:49 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
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We statistically sweep every OECD nation in income. However, the United States' average net adjusted disposable income of the top 20% of the population is an estimated 85,996 USD a year, whereas the bottom 20% live on an estimated 10,854 USD a year (which is about the average in Brazil for disposable income, the lowest country on the scale in the statistic).
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Old 02-11-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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We had an very long and in depth discussion about this topic in this thread

European Union or United States of America
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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While I know the OCED defines "disposable income" as being income after taxes, I find this to be misleading, because in the U.S. we pay out of pocket for a lot of things (such as health insurance, or higher education) which are mostly rolled into taxation in most of the developed world.

Also, the U.S. has higher wealth inequality than any OCED countries besides Mexico and Chile. It's much better to live in the U.S. if you're in the top 20% or so of income distribution. But if you're in the middle or bottom it's not clear at all. I know Canada recently passed us in middle-class wealth for example.
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Old 02-11-2015, 07:14 PM
 
Location: New Orleans, LA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
While I know the OCED defines "disposable income" as being income after taxes, I find this to be misleading, because in the U.S. we pay out of pocket for a lot of things (such as health insurance, or higher education) which are mostly rolled into taxation in most of the developed world.

Also, the U.S. has higher wealth inequality than any OCED countries besides Mexico and Chile. It's much better to live in the U.S. if you're in the top 20% or so of income distribution. But if you're in the middle or bottom it's not clear at all. I know Canada recently passed us in middle-class wealth for example.
Not only that, but the cost of services (especially tuition and healthcare) has skyrocketed since 1990. It's become a nightmare to pay for college lately, and healthcare in this nation is a complete joke. Many people declare bankruptcy if they get sick in the USA, especially in the middle class (the poor are offered alternatives in some parts of the country).
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