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Old 05-12-2015, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
637 posts, read 1,032,880 times
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Jarcolem, I too have noticed the new construction taking place at IUPUI. In the future, that will be a nice downtown campus that will add some flare to that section of town. It's really clean and polished, and with the canal in close proximity, I feel it will greatly help the urban fabric. Indy has the best downtown of all the cities listed, they just need to focus on building a city. It's really flat, and the roads form a perfect grid. All of the single family homes and apartments are pushed far back from the street and have HUGE yards. There's no reason the streets can't have shoulders, sidewalks and streetlights. I have noticed some progress with this in Pike Township, but nothing too significant.

The four walkable hoods of Indy would appear to be the area north of downtown (with the canal), Fountain Square, Holy Cross and Broadripple. I feel those are the only parts of town where you can actually feel a sense of place, everywhere else is pretty non descript. Some walkabikity and better streetscaping would be very transformative for that town.

Oh yeah, I apologize for forgetting to mention, I haven't visited KC so I didn't speak on it. From pictures, it looks like a hybrid of Saint Paul and Indy. Not sure what their college hood is, but they do have Country Club Plaza, which is a nice walkable area that's miles from downtown. Indy, Columbus and Louisville are all only 90 mins from my home, so I visit them often.
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:35 AM
 
2,200 posts, read 2,319,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jarcolem View Post
Also, and i'm just genuinely curious as i've never been to KC, but do they have a "traditional" college neighborhood?
No.



Quote:
I haven't visited KC so I didn't speak on it. From pictures, it looks like a hybrid of Saint Paul and Indy.
Its more like a hybrid of Cincinnati and Indianapolis.
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Old 05-13-2015, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,064 posts, read 4,094,273 times
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Louisville and Cincinnati definitely feel larger than Indianapolis, even though the numbers tell a different story. Louisville and Cincinnati share many similarities. Columbus is the most progressive, but has less of the urban character of Cincinnati or Kansas City (which in some cases is a good thing regarding decay). Kansas City is not growing like the other cities, and to me is the outlier. It has more in common with Oklahoma City and Omaha than it does with these three. It also has the bones to be a major metropolis, if the economy improved, and it received the right investments (i.e. Denver). Indianapolis has a healthy economy but lacks the character and uniqueness of the other cities, it is the Charlotte of the bunch. Cincinnati is making serious investments in its downtown, and is seeing healthy growth throughout the metro.

Louisville: The most southern Midwestern metro. Strong economy, good quality of life. Not too big, not too small. Feels larger than it is, but is in a different tier than the other three.

Cincinnati: A corporate feeling metro with conservative values. Stable economy, artsy, urban, and making the right investments to stay competitive.

Indianapolis: Family friendly, very conservative and straight forward, bland feeling. Strong economy and growth. It continues to lose out to other better metros.

Kansas City: The largest metro of the bunch, and it shows. Great attractions, shopping, and nightlife. Strongest identity. Isolated from the other metros.

Columbus: The most progressive of the bunch. Large university population, great shopping. Like Cincinnati, it needs significant infrastructure improvements. Residential and commercial development has exploded. It offers the best compromise on the strengths of the other metros.
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Old 05-14-2015, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati
637 posts, read 1,032,880 times
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Originally Posted by McdonaldIndy View Post
You can't be serious when you say Louisville feels larger than Indy. Bland feeling is an opinion and very invalid at that for anyone that has actually spent time and lived in the city.
I agree with Shakessha. Indianapolis performs well economically, but it's built environment doesn't match it's true size. I feel Indy could add a million people to the city/area, and it would look the EXACT same. There would just be more exits on the highways further and further out. Indy comes off as a flat Dayton, with more suburbs, and a pleasant Downtown. The lack of neighborhoods and walkability is why people label it bland, not because there is a lack of things to do. Indy has plenty going on.
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austiNati View Post
As stated earlier, Broad Ripple is nice, but you can find places like that in suburban Cincinnati.
Where?
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Old 05-14-2015, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
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Pick anywhere on the Montgomery Rd. corridor from Norwood and up. Cheviot, Reading, North College Hill and more. There are plenty of walkable pub/restaurant scenes there. You could even pull off a beer crawl in Deer Park.
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Old 05-14-2015, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,097,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austiNati View Post
Pick anywhere on the Montgomery Rd. corridor from Norwood and up. Cheviot, Reading, North College Hill and more. There are plenty of walkable pub/restaurant scenes there. You could even pull off a beer crawl in Deer Park.
Montgomery Road:
approaching Silverton
downtown(?) Silverton
Kenwood
more Kenwood
Nightlife district north of Kenwood
Montgomery

Broad Ripple:

College Ave
Broad Ripple Ave
BR Ave approaching the Monon Trail
64th and Cornell
Guildford and Westfield
Westfield along the canal
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Old 05-14-2015, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
1,277 posts, read 4,154,803 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austiNati View Post
I agree with Shakessha. Indianapolis performs well economically, but it's built environment doesn't match it's true size. I feel Indy could add a million people to the city/area, and it would look the EXACT same. There would just be more exits on the highways further and further out. Indy comes off as a flat Dayton, with more suburbs, and a pleasant Downtown. The lack of neighborhoods and walkability is why people label it bland, not because there is a lack of things to do. Indy has plenty going on.
Spot on. Even though columbus and Indy and near twins in population numbers, many who are from columbus and visit Indy return saying Indy has a nice downtown but feels smaller. Columbus has the urban, dense neighborhoods that make it have a bigger city built environment. As the urban renewal craze continues Columbus benefits from further adding dense infill into already dense areas. The infill in the short north, grand view, inner ring suburbs, and the university district is getting taller and more multi use furthering the biggest difference between Indy and Columbus.
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Old 05-15-2015, 09:05 PM
 
321 posts, read 361,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by streetcreed View Post
Spot on. Even though columbus and Indy and near twins in population numbers, many who are from columbus and visit Indy return saying Indy has a nice downtown but feels smaller. Columbus has the urban, dense neighborhoods that make it have a bigger city built environment. As the urban renewal craze continues Columbus benefits from further adding dense infill into already dense areas. The infill in the short north, grand view, inner ring suburbs, and the university district is getting taller and more multi use furthering the biggest difference between Indy and Columbus.
I would say this is spot on as well. Love Indy's museums, cultural trail/ bike path. Monument Circle and other stellar attractions downtown. But once I saw those, I started thinking where is your German village, Brewery District, Short North, Victorian village, Italian village. Even High Steet.
I think Columbus has the advantage long term. You can build a downtown up but it is much harder to add the surrounding neighborhoods adjacent to downtown.
Made me think that if we could combine the two, it would be a sweet city to live in.
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Old 05-17-2015, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,097,157 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbusflyer View Post
I would say this is spot on as well. Love Indy's museums, cultural trail/ bike path. Monument Circle and other stellar attractions downtown. But once I saw those, I started thinking where is your German village, Brewery District, Short North, Victorian village, Italian village. Even High Steet.
I think Columbus has the advantage long term. You can build a downtown up but it is much harder to add the surrounding neighborhoods adjacent to downtown.
Made me think that if we could combine the two, it would be a sweet city to live in.
If building a great downtown is so easy, why hasn't Columbus done that?

Time will tell what happens with both Indy and Columbus. Indy has catching up to do in the neighborhood department, but that is changing. There are up and coming areas peppered outside of downtown.

I think combining Indy and Columbus would create an awesome city, hopefully in the future we just have two awesome cities that capitilized on their strengths and repaired the weak spots.

Last edited by Toxic Toast; 05-17-2015 at 08:10 AM..
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