U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-11-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,199 posts, read 10,411,824 times
Reputation: 11213

Advertisements

Back to the topic, I'd say it is very difficult for smaller cities to prosper except to exist as "satellite" towns for the larger urban areas nearby. I live near Dayton OH and it is a classic example. Not large enough to attract young people (brain gain) or entrepreneurs, but with all the problems of any other urban city (crime, bad schools, etc). Within the general vicinity of two larger cities, but still 1+ hour away from each which will not allow for a "twin city" merger to strengthen both local economies (as with SF/Oak, Sea/Tac, Min/StP etc etc).
A larger problem not just with smaller cities but non-coastal states in general is their inability to set aside differences and merge their economies to compete on a global level. The middle of America (Chicago & Texas aside) will be left in the dust for that reason as much as how many hipsters want to repopulate abandoned warehouses and convert diners into coffee shops & brewpubs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-11-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Metro Birmingham, AL
1,673 posts, read 2,357,933 times
Reputation: 1219
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1988 View Post
I have admitted it, and I guess I'm insane. You actually can stop folks from moving in. Elect politicians that aren't pro growth, and live in a place that isn't a draw to Johnny come lately types.

How would you like if your beloved childhood home now resembled Mogadishu? That's what folks go through and that's why white flight still happens. You are from some ghetto in the city of Birmingham so it makes no difference to you. I've been to Birmingham, Ensley used to be Little Italy now it's Little Soweto
Good luck finding a politician who isn't pro growth.

And since you seem to know me so well I happen to live in one of Birmingham's SUBURBS and even it has changed over the years and will continue to do so. Even the city itself is slowly starting to change with suburban white people moving back in. I know that might come as a shock to you but that's what happens when you spend your life hating people you know nothing about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2015, 06:39 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,673,918 times
Reputation: 1838
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1988 View Post
Why is "growth" or "changing" a good thing? Some folks are happy the way things are..again, ask a white person who grew up in Clayton County Georgia is "change" and "growth" are good.


"Stagnant" places according to you, are my ideal because I know what I'm getting into. I can rest assured that the house I buy will be in the same (same type of folks) neighborhood in 20 years. Southerners in Raleigh, Atlanta etc. have had their worlds destroyed by "growth"
Because the way the U.S. is set up, if you aren't growing as a city, you're dying.

Besides, growth is healthy and natural. Things change. Get used to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-11-2015, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Juneau
601 posts, read 710,838 times
Reputation: 2267
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark1988 View Post
It's truly nuts to me how you people think that everyone desires to white collar city lifestyle

This is definitely an urban bubble. I read a lot of it for entertainment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 05:46 AM
 
3,957 posts, read 3,489,082 times
Reputation: 6336
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
Back to the topic, I'd say it is very difficult for smaller cities to prosper except to exist as "satellite" towns for the larger urban areas nearby. I live near Dayton OH and it is a classic example. Not large enough to attract young people (brain gain) or entrepreneurs, but with all the problems of any other urban city (crime, bad schools, etc). Within the general vicinity of two larger cities, but still 1+ hour away from each which will not allow for a "twin city" merger to strengthen both local economies (as with SF/Oak, Sea/Tac, Min/StP etc etc).
A larger problem not just with smaller cities but non-coastal states in general is their inability to set aside differences and merge their economies to compete on a global level. The middle of America (Chicago & Texas aside) will be left in the dust for that reason as much as how many hipsters want to repopulate abandoned warehouses and convert diners into coffee shops & brewpubs.
First of all Dayton centers an urban area larger than the OP laid out for a small city. Secondly Dayton's size has nothing to do with Dayton's ability to "attract young people or entreprenuers" There are plenty of examples of cities Dayton's size and smaller attracting and retaining young talent, while growing that coveted "educated" demographic. Not all of them are college towns or attached to larger CSA's. Dayton's problem is that it was a Manufacturing and industrial center that hasn't yet transitioned to the knowledge based economy. It's obvious and something every manufacturing center has had to combat no matter what size the city is.

C-Der's are size queens. We here spend so much time debating and lauding like 10 cities. There is NO statistic showing small cities are dying or that they aren't holding their own in the new economy. That's not to say larger cities don't have advantages. The only examples of "dying small cities" I have even seen are ones like above. Don't give me examples of places that rose during the industrial age and then have struggled to compete because their economies never diversified.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,695 posts, read 36,132,256 times
Reputation: 63270
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Apologies if this question has been brought up for discussion before. Do small cities have a future in the US? As our economy grows bigger and becomes more consolidated, companies are growing larger and thus are flocking to larger metros like Chicago, Boston, New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston, Phoenix, Seattle etc. Talent and educated individuals are following said companies to find jobs. As a result, it seems like smaller metros, particularly the ones under ~600-700k, are getting squeezed out. Do any of these small cities have a chance to escape the brain drain and corporate drain that has been going on, or will this be an inescapable trend for all small metros? What do you guys think?
All I can tell you is that I've lived most of my life in cities of between 100k and 300k and most of them seem to be thriving quite nicely. It's my favorite size of city in fact, as long as there's a larger metro area within a few hours' drive.

Personally, if I have the LUXURY of choosing between Dallas and Tyler, Texas, I'm choosing Tyler hands down. In fact, I do have that luxury and I live in the Tyler area.

Tyler is a good example of a small city that continues to grow, attract businesses, and maintain it's "brains."
Tyler, Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Here are some other small cities I've lived in which which have had consistent growth and are doing well economically:

Columbus, GA
Newport News, VA
Fayetteville, NC
Longview, TX

I have friends and family in these cities and I've watched their cities grow and prosper steadily as well:
Shreveport, LA
Colorado Springs, CO
Norfolk, VA
Columbia, SC
Little Rock, AR
Columbus, OH
Springfield, MO
Oklahoma City, OK
Baton Rouge, LA

Companies continue to move to such towns and cities because believe it or not, not everyone wants to live or work in a huge, congested urban area. There are many smaller metro areas throughout this country which are thriving and growing.

Last edited by KathrynAragon; 04-12-2015 at 07:36 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,024 posts, read 2,462,079 times
Reputation: 2312
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Apologies if this question has been brought up for discussion before. Do small cities have a future in the US? As our economy grows bigger and becomes more consolidated, companies are growing larger and thus are flocking to larger metros like Chicago, Boston, New York, San Francisco, Atlanta, Houston, Phoenix, Seattle etc. Talent and educated individuals are following said companies to find jobs. As a result, it seems like smaller metros, particularly the ones under ~600-700k, are getting squeezed out. Do any of these small cities have a chance to escape the brain drain and corporate drain that has been going on, or will this be an inescapable trend for all small metros? What do you guys think?
I don't think the midsized cities (250-600k) are particularly getting squeezed out, as they are still likely to be large population centers for their areas. The cities in my opinion that are likely to be getting squeezed out are the metro areas in the 100-200k range, especially since a lot of them are next door to larger metro areas with more amenities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,695 posts, read 36,132,256 times
Reputation: 63270
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharks With Lasers View Post
I don't think the midsized cities (250-600k) are particularly getting squeezed out, as they are still likely to be large population centers for their areas. The cities in my opinion that are likely to be getting squeezed out are the metro areas in the 100-200k range, especially since a lot of them are next door to larger metro areas with more amenities.
Take a look at this list of US metro areas and you will see that even the vast majority of small metro areas like ones you're describing are enjoying very healthy growth rates.

List of Metropolitan Statistical Areas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top