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Old 04-12-2015, 08:05 AM
 
6,483 posts, read 4,069,179 times
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Yeah, the walkability. Don't get me wrong, I love being able to walk to shops and other places and my neighborhood scores quite high in that regard, for a SoCal suburb. But I can't imagine living without a car or wanting to. As for the young people...my daughter is turning 16 this year and a major topic on her mind is getting her driver's license. Most of the kids in her class are slightly older and already have permits or even licenses, so it's a big deal to them. I keep hearing how young people don't care about driving, but that's not what I'm seeing.

There's also an extreme paranoia on C-D about living near "superficial, artificial, shallow, plastic, materialistic" people. Everyone is looking for the "friendly, down-to-earth, genuine" types. Maybe I just hear more about that because of my location, but as far as I can tell there are both types everywhere, and the majority of Americans are friendly and down-to-earth.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:48 AM
 
56,569 posts, read 80,847,919 times
Reputation: 12499
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKWildcat1981 View Post
I agree with you both. People take this site too serious, people try to insult me on here like it will have an effect on my life. It has zero effect, I don't really care what strangers think of me, I am not an insecure teenager. I have met a lot of d bags on this site. Lot of people have agendas on this site which is kinda sad, I don't believe that was what this site was created and intended for. Cheers to you both for being reasonable on a site full of idiots. I tip my cap and my beer to you both.
Can you say that again? I've actually had to deal with this many times and I find it quite odd to say the least. That is just one thing I've noticed that is strange on this forum.
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Old 04-12-2015, 08:55 AM
 
1,998 posts, read 2,931,684 times
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Bizarre to me that so many people in this thread seem to think that people who care about walkability and density are some fringe group that only exists on the Internet. Here in Washington DC the love for a non-car-oriented lifestyle is quite real. There is a MASSIVE rent premium for the apartments and houses that are in the dense urban neighborhoods with walking distance to tons of amenities and public transit. Off-street parking is practically non-existent or super-expensive in these areas so most people just go without a car because it's easier and you don't need one. People are willing to pay that much more for a more pedestrian, urban, non-car-oriented lifestyle. I don't have to cite anecdotal evidence based on the people I know on this (even though the vast majority of my friends hate driving) The evidence is right there in the housing prices.
Does this mean a MAJORITY of the people in Washington DC care so much about walkability? No. But it is a heck of a lot more than a couple basement dwellers posting on the Internet.
You might say this is just one city out of hundreds, but I know that several other large cities (NYC, San Francisco, Boston) are the same way where proximity to transit and density commands a huge premium.
It might still be a strict minority of the population that likes walkability, but it doesn't seem like such a fringe group to me if there are enough to have noticeable effects on housing prices in several of the largest cities in the country.
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Old 04-12-2015, 09:31 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,148,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
Bizarre to me that so many people in this thread seem to think that people who care about walkability and density are some fringe group that only exists on the Internet. Here in Washington DC the love for a non-car-oriented lifestyle is quite real. There is a MASSIVE rent premium for the apartments and houses that are in the dense urban neighborhoods with walking distance to tons of amenities and public transit. Off-street parking is practically non-existent or super-expensive in these areas so most people just go without a car because it's easier and you don't need one. People are willing to pay that much more for a more pedestrian, urban, non-car-oriented lifestyle. I don't have to cite anecdotal evidence based on the people I know on this (even though the vast majority of my friends hate driving) The evidence is right there in the housing prices.
Does this mean a MAJORITY of the people in Washington DC care so much about walkability? No. But it is a heck of a lot more than a couple basement dwellers posting on the Internet.
You might say this is just one city out of hundreds, but I know that several other large cities (NYC, San Francisco, Boston) are the same way where proximity to transit and density commands a huge premium.
It might still be a strict minority of the population that likes walkability, but it doesn't seem like such a fringe group to me if there are enough to have noticeable effects on housing prices in several of the largest cities in the country.
and also its not to me about not having a car, I do. I like being able to experience so much without it and being in a walkable area where I can walk to so many things. Its a pleasantry in a sense yet there are pros and cons to any area. I love the plethora of choices that are foot steps away and not needing to worry about driving when I go out. This from someone that will probably always have a car

I think some of the cities with walkable and dense areas offer a living environment not available in most places I enjoy. It doesn't make it right or wrong just an option I personally enjoy and choose to live in
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Old 04-12-2015, 10:54 AM
 
77 posts, read 110,253 times
Reputation: 94
walkability, city limit population, city limit crime "rate", nightlife
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:27 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,870,138 times
Reputation: 2342
How close your city is to other cities.....
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,453 posts, read 7,520,622 times
Reputation: 4334
Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
Bizarre to me that so many people in this thread seem to think that people who care about walkability and density are some fringe group that only exists on the Internet. Here in Washington DC the love for a non-car-oriented lifestyle is quite real. There is a MASSIVE rent premium for the apartments and houses that are in the dense urban neighborhoods with walking distance to tons of amenities and public transit. Off-street parking is practically non-existent or super-expensive in these areas so most people just go without a car because it's easier and you don't need one. People are willing to pay that much more for a more pedestrian, urban, non-car-oriented lifestyle. I don't have to cite anecdotal evidence based on the people I know on this (even though the vast majority of my friends hate driving) The evidence is right there in the housing prices.
Does this mean a MAJORITY of the people in Washington DC care so much about walkability? No. But it is a heck of a lot more than a couple basement dwellers posting on the Internet.
You might say this is just one city out of hundreds, but I know that several other large cities (NYC, San Francisco, Boston) are the same way where proximity to transit and density commands a huge premium.
It might still be a strict minority of the population that likes walkability, but it doesn't seem like such a fringe group to me if there are enough to have noticeable effects on housing prices in several of the largest cities in the country.
I think there are a couple of issues you're touching on here.

I do agree, as Millenial (and one that also lives in the DC area) there is at somewhat of a shift in mentality towards preferring less car-oriented environments. However, 1) the degree of this shift is debatable, and 2) people who are in highly-walkable cities are a self-selected population; they're more likely to be there because they care about such things. And so this pretty much creates a demographic skew of people who strongly prefer these living environments already.

No, it's not a fringe group -- and the fact that many cities/towns across the US are trying to foster more mixed-use/transit-oriented/walkable development is a testament to the increasing popularity of better urban planning. But, even so, I do think the vast majority of Americans--young and old--are still okay with relying on their car most of the time. It's just very ingrained cultural mindset that will not change overnight. I also think this will continue to evolve over time, but the notion that this has changed drastically over the course of a decade or so I think is just a bit of wishful thinking among the urban planning community (and often exaggerated in the media). Even in most cities that are considered pretty walkable, you'll find development with 1:1 parking ratios, so it's not even like cities like DC, SF and Boston are walkable utopias.

I will also add that the areas/cities in which there is the biggest shift towards prefering walkability are those with the most traffic congestion. Many people are now realizing that traffic and increasing commute times are now having a serious impact on their quality-of-life, but again, the shift is still gradual and it certainly will not occur at the same rate everywhere (basically, if your commute isn't that long and parking isn't a hassle anywhere, you have less of a reason to care about walking places and less of an impetus to want to live somewhere that is more walkable).

That being said, I think few Americans will ever feel comfortable with giving up cars completely, as it's hard to argue against the convenience that private vehicles provide in certain instances.

Last edited by Duderino; 04-12-2015 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,870,138 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
Millenials want walkability because they don't want to have to drive... at all, if they can help it. They aspire to live a car-free lifestyle.

That's not an overblown topic, it's a generation-gap topic. If you don't get it, it's because you're not paying attention to millenials.
I am a millenial and I want nothing to do with a walkable lifestyle..... Hipsters want that lifestyle, not millenials.
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Old 04-12-2015, 11:56 AM
 
Location: LBC
4,155 posts, read 4,482,811 times
Reputation: 3543
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grizzly Addams View Post
I am a millenial and I want nothing to do with a walkable lifestyle..... Hipsters want that lifestyle, not millenials.
Then you should on suburbdata.com.
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Old 04-12-2015, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Twin Cities (StP)
3,017 posts, read 1,870,138 times
Reputation: 2342
Quote:
Originally Posted by nslander View Post
Then you should on suburbdata.com.
Why is that?
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