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Old 04-13-2015, 08:43 PM
 
12,660 posts, read 10,505,128 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Most of Northwest Philly could go toe to toe with anywhere; It's surrounded by parkland. Even parts of Center City have tall old trees covering across the street.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0575...uDqMM0GAEQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9480...Lk83s8h7CQ!2e0
Older areas tend to have more trees because there's less new development, trees haven't been knocked down recently for buulding, instead they had decades or centuries to grow. Weird comment by that poster. Don't expect to see a ton of trees all over Manhattan outside Central Park and some neighborhoods but there are 4 other boroughs - with many rather suburban areas (ahem - Staten Island).
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,884 posts, read 10,387,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
Older areas tend to have more trees because there's less new development, trees haven't been knocked down recently for buulding, instead they had decades or centuries to grow. Weird comment by that poster. Don't expect to see a ton of trees all over Manhattan outside Central Park and some neighborhoods but there are 4 other boroughs - with many rather suburban areas (ahem - Staten Island).
Yep-a lot of newly developed areas have small young trees that are very bare. And even in Manhattan there are blocks covered by tall old trees.
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Old 04-13-2015, 08:54 PM
 
Location: A subtropical paradise
2,069 posts, read 2,199,368 times
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In general, pick any city in the South, be it Brownsville, Houston, New Orleans, Miami, Savannah, Atlanta, or Asheville, and it is going to have lots of lush tree-covered neighborhoods (and green year-round for areas in the region with milder winters).
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Old 04-13-2015, 09:07 PM
Status: "Got the rocking modern neon sound" (set 10 days ago)
 
Location: Boston
2,041 posts, read 1,993,463 times
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Boston!


Beacon Hill, Boston by SkylineScenes (Bill Cobb), on Flickr


Boston Back Bay Aerial by Steve Tiesdell Legacy Collection, on Flickr


Boston by jeffgunn, on Flickr
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Old 04-13-2015, 09:29 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,465,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Most of Northwest Philly could go toe to toe with anywhere; It's surrounded by parkland. Even parts of Center City have tall old trees covering across the street.
https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0575...uDqMM0GAEQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9480...Lk83s8h7CQ!2e0
No one denies Philly has a lot of Parkland and HUGE Fairmont Park. THE THREAD TOPIC IS ABOUT HAVING ...."A LOT" of tree-covered neighborhoods. But the Heart of Philly has ROW HOMES ON TIGHT STREETS. MANY PLAIN BRICK WALL TO WALL ONES, TO THE NARROW SIDEWALKS? ESPECIALLY POOR NEIGHBORHOODS HAVE LESS TREES.

MILES OF THESE ROWS HAVE NO BACK YARDS OR SOME back yards at least? IT IS THESE WITH NO GREEN SPACE IN FRONT OR TREES? SOME OUT PLANTERS OUTSIDE. Gentrified and redevelopment add trees today. In better neighborhoods.

I do know Philly built especially after ww2 does have tree lined neighborhoods

Again.... these .......pictures Proves it
Tight Rows ⤵ and this plenty trees in distance in New Jersey
Attached Thumbnails
Cities with a lot of tree-covered neighborhoods?-phila-rowhouse-city.jpg   Cities with a lot of tree-covered neighborhoods?-philly-overhead.jpg  

Last edited by steeps; 04-13-2015 at 09:44 PM..
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Old 04-14-2015, 07:46 AM
 
Location: The Springs
1,770 posts, read 2,138,987 times
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Boulder has amazing tree-covered neighborhoods for being located where it is.
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Old 04-14-2015, 08:02 AM
 
9,446 posts, read 5,254,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Most of Northwest Philly could go toe to toe with anywhere; It's surrounded by parkland. Even parts of Center City have tall old trees covering across the street.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0575...uDqMM0GAEQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9480...Lk83s8h7CQ!2e0
Ignorant posters don't know that Philly has massive parks like Fairmount and Pennypack. Isn't Fairmount Park the largest municipal park in the country?
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Old 04-14-2015, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota
1,379 posts, read 1,195,619 times
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Both the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul are composed almost entirely of neighborhoods with shady, tree-lined streets.

I believe the OP, however, is asking for cities that have tree-covered neighborhoods in which trees form a cathedral over streets. Before Dutch Elm Disease decimated elm populations, every single street in the Twin Cities was a cathedral; these days, there's more arboreal diversity so the cathedral effect isn't as prominent.
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Old 04-14-2015, 09:57 AM
 
6,816 posts, read 6,950,655 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyb01 View Post
Ignorant posters don't know that Philly has massive parks like Fairmount and Pennypack. Isn't Fairmount Park the largest municipal park in the country?
It didn't say parks though. It said neighborhoods and Philly does not have a lot of tree covered neighborhoods.
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Old 04-14-2015, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
10,087 posts, read 13,111,636 times
Reputation: 3982
Not a lot of them in Los Angeles. Most neighborhoods have palm trees, which block out nothing (and combined with the concrete carpet that has been laid throughout the city, makes for an unpleasant experience in the summer).

Here in Pasadena we have a couple neighborhoods like this, in particular the wealthiest neighborhoods such as the mansion districts south of California Avenue and around Orange Grove.
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