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Old 08-09-2015, 10:32 PM
 
Location: East Central Pennsylvania/ Chicago for 6yrs.
2,539 posts, read 2,467,330 times
Reputation: 1483

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Quote:
Originally Posted by travelingeverywhere View Post
The single most urban densest and top 5 urban densest cities don't have much tree cover in the immediate downtown area? You don't say.

Of course newer cities are going to have more incorporated. Their urban density comes nowhere near the former, and their infrastructure is much newer.
The thread ask about cities neighborhoods. Therefore it's the city OVERALL. I think it calls for a Picture.
A picture can PROVE a city is truly TREE COVERED in neighborhoods. Not sure what you mean by NEWER CITIES have more trees incorporated? Chicago has plenty of trees and the Older neighborhoods have the Largest trees.

Over CHICAGO. TREES tower over homes.
Attached Thumbnails
Cities with a lot of tree-covered neighborhoods?-chicago-above-trees.jpg  
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Old 09-07-2015, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
12 posts, read 47,685 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Um...Houston IS a southern city, in most respects.
Houston is definitely a Southern city, but it is not a southeastern city, which is what I was referring to. I think southeastern has to be east of the Mississippi River. A lot of people in the South (especially the southeast) do not consider any of Texas to be Southern, although east Texas clearly is.
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Old 09-07-2015, 02:08 PM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,796 posts, read 6,530,574 times
Reputation: 1546
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post
Houston is definitely a Southern city, but it is not a southeastern city, which is what I was referring to. I think southeastern has to be east of the Mississippi River. A lot of people in the South (especially the southeast) do not consider any of Texas to be Southern, although east Texas clearly is.
Those that are not from the south don't but we consider Texas as southern as well as Florida.
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Old 01-25-2017, 04:46 AM
 
7 posts, read 3,104 times
Reputation: 19
Houston has a number of neighborhoods where the trees hover above the streets.

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7379...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7754...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7281...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7288...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@30.0469...8i6656!6m1!1e1

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7596...7i13312!8i6656

https://www.google.com/maps/@29.7245...8i6656!6m1!1e1
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Old 01-25-2017, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
6,854 posts, read 11,128,311 times
Reputation: 6842
I've found that most cities in the US have some tree lined neighborhoods.

I think the most treeless I've ever seen is San Francisco. The trees are confined mostly to Golden Gate Park and the Presidio area. Next might be the desert southwest cities- El Paso maybe.
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:51 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,591 posts, read 4,014,719 times
Reputation: 2926
Greenville SC
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Old 01-25-2017, 07:27 AM
 
2,211 posts, read 1,677,368 times
Reputation: 2031
Pittsburgh, PA

https://www.google.com/maps/place/No...254392!6m1!1e1
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Old 01-25-2017, 07:42 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,938 posts, read 36,237,009 times
Reputation: 63608
The Azalea District in Tyler, Texas:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Mo...112905!6m1!1e1
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:25 PM
 
2,551 posts, read 1,644,008 times
Reputation: 2034
Try Sacramento,
You will be surprised how beautiful and plenty the tree-lined neighborhoods are.
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Old 01-25-2017, 09:39 PM
 
61 posts, read 78,407 times
Reputation: 122
According to this recent study Sacramento is the greenest city in the US (in terms of trees)

Treepedia study confirms Sacramento as City of Trees
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