U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-23-2015, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Seattle
6,981 posts, read 9,074,826 times
Reputation: 3821

Advertisements

Seattle and Portland rarely have "wintry weather" even in the middle of January, so this thread needs to go to the recycle bin.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-23-2015, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN
4,925 posts, read 4,931,399 times
Reputation: 4778
Quote:
Originally Posted by Botev1912 View Post
Seattle and Portland rarely have "wintry weather" even in the middle of January, so this thread needs to go to the recycle bin.
I agree with you but 80-90 percent of these threads on here are idiotic by nature anyway, everyone gives their opinion and passes it off as fact and then gets mad when not everyone agrees with them, welcome to City DATA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2015, 07:46 PM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,837,380 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
The thing to keep in mind with that comparison between Omaha and Seattle is, that in Seattle in March trees were already leafing out if not fully done already, grass (as it is all winter) is green and growing- flowers are all blooming. It almost never gets below freezing at night. In the Omaha area, in a normal March, grass is still brown, trees are still bare, and it may get warm sometimes, but also is not uncommon to get snow or frigid cold snaps, with frequent/common nightly lows below freezing.
(I know this comparison well after having lived 12 years near Omaha and now living in the Seattle area)
Grass is still brown in march because omaha is a very dry climate in winter. Snow is relatively uncommon in march with an average of like 2 inches a year, 26 inches for a yearly average. Our average highs hit almost 60 by the end of the month. That said, i love winter and wish we had much more than we do. Like a Minneapolis or Chicago.

Omaha also sees a lot more sun than seattle during the year and its not even close. In fact, omaha is as sunny as most outside of the deserts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-23-2015, 10:02 PM
 
Location: IN
20,871 posts, read 36,023,332 times
Reputation: 13324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omahahonors View Post
Grass is still brown in march because omaha is a very dry climate in winter. Snow is relatively uncommon in march with an average of like 2 inches a year, 26 inches for a yearly average. Our average highs hit almost 60 by the end of the month. That said, i love winter and wish we had much more than we do. Like a Minneapolis or Chicago.

Omaha also sees a lot more sun than seattle during the year and its not even close. In fact, omaha is as sunny as most outside of the deserts.
The nice thing about the upper Midwest cold months during winter is that the snow cover is fairly continuous, meaning rarely do you have to look at bare ground. Snow cover also brightens the surface, making for easier driving conditions with a low sun angle combined with shorter daylight hours. I also must mention that there are two sub-regions of the Midwest. One is the prairie zone (Corn and Soybean belt) that covers most of southern and western Minnesota, northern Iowa, southwest Wisconsin. Then you have a larger Northwoods region, part of the Canadian shield with low populations and more tourism. Minneapolis, for example, has a different climate than Hayward, WI for example- even though they are at similar latitudes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 04:31 AM
 
1,054 posts, read 1,837,380 times
Reputation: 699
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The nice thing about the upper Midwest cold months during winter is that the snow cover is fairly continuous, meaning rarely do you have to look at bare ground. Snow cover also brightens the surface, making for easier driving conditions with a low sun angle hicombined with shorter daylight hours. I also must mention that there are two sub-regions of the Midwest. One is the prairie zone (Corn and Soybean belt) that covers most of southern and western Minnesota, northern Iowa, southwest Wisconsin. Then you have a larger Northwoods region, part of the Canadian shield with low populations and more tourism. Minneapolis, for example, has a different climate than Hayward, WI for example- even though they are at similar latitudes.
I agree. When the snow falls here (dryish and 50% precip is rain in winter), it usually melts within days to a few weeks (can happen between mid december to mid/late January ). That exposes a lot of brown for long periods of time. The brown is resolved with rain but we are just too dry until march, sometimes april or even may.

This year weve seen quite a few march and april showers which allowed the green to appear and stay.

I would take a Minneapolis winter in a minute.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2015, 10:04 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,622 posts, read 3,737,946 times
Reputation: 4188
The Pacific Northwest has many varied climates. The "west of the cascades" is different than "east of the cascades", and that is important.

While Seattle and Portland can be cool almost year round, they do have a moderating influence, (think Pacific Ocean), and that keeps both from extremes, though Portland can get a cold freezing rain from the east through the Columbia Gorge. East of the cascades, it is an entirely different climate. But even within this region there are variables. Spokane can be cold with lots of snow (not this year), but the Tri-Cities (Richland/Pasco/Kennewick) can be mild as they are at low elevation and have more of desert climate, with little precip.

I guess my point here is not to make too many generalizations about the Pacific Northwest. If you like sunshine and warm temps from April to October, the Tri-Cities fill the bill. If you like mild temps with little snowfall, then western WA may be for you. Obviously, these are generalities, as Seattle can and does get snow, and the eastern part of the state can and will get cold during the winter. (however, not this winter)...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,735 posts, read 3,586,382 times
Reputation: 2336
Pittsburgh received another coating of snow today (0.3"). I think we've had only one day above 70 degrees. "Spring"

https://twitter.com/NWSPittsburgh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,413,795 times
Reputation: 8055
Quote:
Originally Posted by speagles84 View Post
Pittsburgh received another coating of snow today (0.3"). I think we've had only one day above 70 degrees. "Spring"

https://twitter.com/NWSPittsburgh
Wow-that's hard to believe when on the other side of the state Philly in April has seen 1 day above 80, 8 days above 70 and only 6 days where it did not go above 60.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Northeast Suburbs of PITTSBURGH
3,735 posts, read 3,586,382 times
Reputation: 2336
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2e1m5a View Post
Wow-that's hard to believe when on the other side of the state Philly in April has seen 1 day above 80, 8 days above 70 and only 6 days where it did not go above 60.
Its been quite cold over here this spring; its supposed to hit 55 today (we will see). It snowed the last 3 days, and the Mountains above Pittsburgh in Somerset/Fayette/Westmoreland counties got 4" Thursday.

https://www.facebook.com/SevenSpring...type=3&theater

Philadelphia (although being in the same state) has a significantly warmer climate than Pittsburgh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-25-2015, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Chicago
589 posts, read 619,671 times
Reputation: 450
Chicago is in a region of COLD winters and HOT summers, while the North West is a bit more temperate and less drastic changes between seasons.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top