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Old 04-20-2015, 08:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Please elaborate.



Again, please elaborate.
I also wonder about the suburban angle too.
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Old 04-20-2015, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
Please elaborate.
In terms of culture, I think Buffalo's Albright–Knox gallery beats the Carnegie Museum of Art. The Buffalo Philharmonic does great work, and their tickets are a great value. Organizations like the Western New York Center for Book Arts and the Just Buffalo Literary Center support a thriving literary scene. Last weekend, Buffalo hosted the Small Press Book Fair, the largest of its kind in the country. Buffalo also has a thieving zine scene. In terms of immigrant communities, Buffalo is diverse: Burmese, Sudanese, Arab, Polish, Latin American, all adding to the rich local culture.

In terms of urban neighborhoods, I think Buffalo's Allentown is superior to South Side in Pittsburgh. It has better bars, no chain restaurants, and cooler architecture. I think Buffalo's Elmwood Village is better than Pittsburgh's Sunnyside. Elmwood Village has better restaurants and cafes, and I think the grand boulevards add a unique touch to the neighborhood.

However, I feel like Pittsburgh has some of the best suburbs in the country. Due to the geography, Pittsburgh doesn't have same tasteless sprawl that you'll see in all too many American cities. What you'll get in Buffalo's suburbs from what I've seen, is a flat expanse of 1200 square-foot, single-family, 1950's, Beaver-Cleaver-style homes that extend as far as the eye can see. They lack the charm that you'll find in many Rochester or Syracuse suburbs. Whereas, in Pittsburgh, you'll get a development here and there, but they're surrounded by lush hills and dark forests.
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Old 04-20-2015, 12:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
In terms of culture, I think Buffalo's Albright–Knox gallery beats the Carnegie Museum of Art. The Buffalo Philharmonic does great work, and their tickets are a great value. Organizations like the Western New York Center for Book Arts and the Just Buffalo Literary Center support a thriving literary scene. Last weekend, Buffalo hosted the Small Press Book Fair, the largest of its kind in the country. Buffalo also has a thieving zine scene. In terms of immigrant communities, Buffalo is diverse: Burmese, Sudanese, Arab, Polish, Latin American, all adding to the rich local culture.

In terms of urban neighborhoods, I think Buffalo's Allentown is superior to South Side in Pittsburgh. It has better bars, no chain restaurants, and cooler architecture. I think Buffalo's Elmwood Village is better than Pittsburgh's Sunnyside. Elmwood Village has better restaurants and cafes, and I think the grand boulevards add a unique touch to the neighborhood.

However, I feel like Pittsburgh has some of the best suburbs in the country. Due to the geography, Pittsburgh doesn't have same tasteless sprawl that you'll see in all too many American cities. What you'll get in Buffalo's suburbs from what I've seen, is a flat expanse of 1200 square-foot, single-family, 1950's, Beaver-Cleaver-style homes that extend as far as the eye can see. They lack the charm that you'll find in many Rochester or Syracuse suburbs. Whereas, in Pittsburgh, you'll get a development here and there, but they're surrounded by lush hills and dark forests.
I think the suburban villages(Kenmore, Orchard Park, Hamburg, Williamsville, Lancaster, Depew, etc) and other suburbs like the Eggertsville and Snyder areas of the town Amherst buck that trend. Villages are essentially similar to a borough in PA or a smaller scale of urbanity. You also have small blue collar cities like Lackawanna and the T-NT area(Tonawanda and North Tonawanda) outside of Buffalo too.
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Old 04-20-2015, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
In terms of culture, I think Buffalo's Albright–Knox gallery beats the Carnegie Museum of Art. The Buffalo Philharmonic does great work, and their tickets are a great value. Organizations like the Western New York Center for Book Arts and the Just Buffalo Literary Center support a thriving literary scene. Last weekend, Buffalo hosted the Small Press Book Fair, the largest of its kind in the country. Buffalo also has a thieving zine scene. In terms of immigrant communities, Buffalo is diverse: Burmese, Sudanese, Arab, Polish, Latin American, all adding to the rich local culture.
Most of these factors are very subjective, and my own experience of Buffalo is too limited to make real comparisons. I will grant you that there is no question Buffalo is significantly more diverse than Pittsburgh however.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
In terms of urban neighborhoods, I think Buffalo's Allentown is superior to South Side in Pittsburgh. It has better bars, no chain restaurants, and cooler architecture. I think Buffalo's Elmwood Village is better than Pittsburgh's Sunnyside. Elmwood Village has better restaurants and cafes, and I think the grand boulevards add a unique touch to the neighborhood.
You mean Shadyside, not Sunnyside I think. I think Allentown and Elmwood Village are fine neighborhoods, but they are both shrinking slightly in terms of population still, which cannot be said for Southside Flats or Shadyside in Pittsburgh.

The other aspect is from what I understand outside of Downtown and those two neighborhoods, Buffalo doesn't have that many other gentrifying and/or middle-class neighborhoods. Pittsburgh has tons more though: Lawrenceville, Mexican War Streets, Allegheny West, Polish Hill, Bloomfield, East Liberty, Highland Park, Squirrel Hill, Point Breeze, Regent Square, etc. Particularly in the East End of the city of Pittsburgh, it's getting to the point where nearly every neighborhood which isn't overwhelmingly black is either an established upper-middle class area or gentrifying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
However, I feel like Pittsburgh has some of the best suburbs in the country. Due to the geography, Pittsburgh doesn't have same tasteless sprawl that you'll see in all too many American cities. What you'll get in Buffalo's suburbs from what I've seen, is a flat expanse of 1200 square-foot, single-family, 1950's, Beaver-Cleaver-style homes that extend as far as the eye can see. They lack the charm that you'll find in many Rochester or Syracuse suburbs. Whereas, in Pittsburgh, you'll get a development here and there, but they're surrounded by lush hills and dark forests.
Funny, because with only a few exceptions - still independent streetcar suburbs and a few early automobile suburbs, all of which had their core built out before the 1920s - I feel that Pittsburgh's suburbs are interchangeable, and have remarkably ugly vernacular architecture. I always tell people don't bother moving here unless you like city living, because there's nothing particularly noteworthy about the suburbs themselves.
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Old 04-20-2015, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Most of these factors are very subjective, and my own experience of Buffalo is too limited to make real comparisons. I will grant you that there is no question Buffalo is significantly more diverse than Pittsburgh however.



You mean Shadyside, not Sunnyside I think. I think Allentown and Elmwood Village are fine neighborhoods, but they are both shrinking slightly in terms of population still, which cannot be said for Southside Flats or Shadyside in Pittsburgh.

The other aspect is from what I understand outside of Downtown and those two neighborhoods, Buffalo doesn't have that many other gentrifying and/or middle-class neighborhoods. Pittsburgh has tons more though: Lawrenceville, Mexican War Streets, Allegheny West, Polish Hill, Bloomfield, East Liberty, Highland Park, Squirrel Hill, Point Breeze, Regent Square, etc. Particularly in the East End of the city of Pittsburgh, it's getting to the point where nearly every neighborhood which isn't overwhelmingly black is either an established upper-middle class area or gentrifying.



Funny, because with only a few exceptions - still independent streetcar suburbs and a few early automobile suburbs, all of which had their core built out before the 1920s - I feel that Pittsburgh's suburbs are interchangeable, and have remarkably ugly vernacular architecture. I always tell people don't bother moving here unless you like city living, because there's nothing particularly noteworthy about the suburbs themselves.
Buffalo also has North Buffalo(inc North Park, Starin Central, Hertel Ave), Parkside, Central Park, Vernon Triangle and perhaps parts of South Buffalo, with maybe a few others. Basically, west of Main Street is generally nicer than east of Main, with some exceptions, give or take.
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Old 04-21-2015, 11:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post

In terms of urban neighborhoods, I think Buffalo's Allentown is superior to South Side in Pittsburgh. It has better bars, no chain restaurants, and cooler architecture. I think Buffalo's Elmwood Village is better than Pittsburgh's Sunnyside. Elmwood Village has better restaurants and cafes, and I think the grand boulevards add a unique touch to the neighborhood.

These are fine and interesting neighborhoods, but they don't seem to compare to the density or amount of options and amenities offered in those Pittsburgh neighborhoods you are comparing them to. I think Buffalo's Allentown, in terms of size of the business district, would be more comparable to Shadyside in Pittsburgh. while Elmwood village would be more comparable to Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill in terms of the overall business district. I don't think Buffalo has a neighborhood comparable to Pittsburgh's South side.
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Old 04-21-2015, 11:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _Buster View Post
These are fine and interesting neighborhoods, but they don't seem to compare to the density or amount of options and amenities offered in those Pittsburgh neighborhoods you are comparing them to. I think Buffalo's Allentown, in terms of size of the business district, would be more comparable to Shadyside in Pittsburgh. while Elmwood village would be more comparable to Pittsburgh's Squirrel Hill in terms of the overall business district. I don't think Buffalo has a neighborhood comparable to Pittsburgh's Southside.
Hertel Ave in North Buffalo is probably the best bet: HertelAvenue.com - Hertel Avenue Buffalo NY - Stores, Restaurants, Night Clubs, Services, Business

The North Buffalo Organization | Your #NorthBuffalo Community Organization

Hertel-North Buffalo Business Association

http://goo.gl/maps/lH87U
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Old 04-22-2015, 06:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Most of these factors are very subjective, and my own experience of Buffalo is too limited to make real comparisons. I will grant you that there is no question Buffalo is significantly more diverse than Pittsburgh however.



You mean Shadyside, not Sunnyside I think. I think Allentown and Elmwood Village are fine neighborhoods, but they are both shrinking slightly in terms of population still, which cannot be said for Southside Flats or Shadyside in Pittsburgh.

The other aspect is from what I understand outside of Downtown and those two neighborhoods, Buffalo doesn't have that many other gentrifying and/or middle-class neighborhoods. Pittsburgh has tons more though: Lawrenceville, Mexican War Streets, Allegheny West, Polish Hill, Bloomfield, East Liberty, Highland Park, Squirrel Hill, Point Breeze, Regent Square, etc. Particularly in the East End of the city of Pittsburgh, it's getting to the point where nearly every neighborhood which isn't overwhelmingly black is either an established upper-middle class area or gentrifying.



Funny, because with only a few exceptions - still independent streetcar suburbs and a few early automobile suburbs, all of which had their core built out before the 1920s - I feel that Pittsburgh's suburbs are interchangeable, and have remarkably ugly vernacular architecture. I always tell people don't bother moving here unless you like city living, because there's nothing particularly noteworthy about the suburbs themselves.
What about a suburb like Sewickley or Dormont, both of which appears to be walkable?

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 04-22-2015 at 06:42 AM..
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Old 04-22-2015, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
What about a suburb like Sewickley or Dormont, both of which appears to be walkable?
Yes, Sewickley and Dormont are some of the main exceptions. Aspinwall and Mount Lebanon are two others. There's also Regent Square, which is partially in the city, and partially in three independent municipalities. A few of the former mill towns (Carnegie in particular) have begun to gentrify. And boroughs like Crafton and Bellvue have beautiful homes, even if they aren't highly desirable and don't have a lot going on commercially.

That said, Allegheny County has around 150 municipalities, so this is really a drop in the bucket. The vast majority of Pittsburgh's suburbs lack walkable amenities or even built charm. The mid century "bunker style" home common in the suburbs is particularly awful - a square-shaped brick box with ill-proportioned windows thrown on wherever the builder felt like it.
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Old 04-22-2015, 09:09 AM
 
56,807 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Yes, Sewickley and Dormont are some of the main exceptions. Aspinwall and Mount Lebanon are two others. There's also Regent Square, which is partially in the city, and partially in three independent municipalities. A few of the former mill towns (Carnegie in particular) have begun to gentrify. And boroughs like Crafton and Bellvue have beautiful homes, even if they aren't highly desirable and don't have a lot going on commercially.

That said, Allegheny County has around 150 municipalities, so this is really a drop in the bucket. The vast majority of Pittsburgh's suburbs lack walkable amenities or even built charm. The mid century "bunker style" home common in the suburbs is particularly awful - a square-shaped brick box with ill-proportioned windows thrown on wherever the builder felt like it.
Interesting.....Here are some of the Buffalo suburbs that I mentioned, that would be a better fit for those that want something more walkable: https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9022...lUjPx354SQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9628...tSRWPc1aAQ!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/place/La...6871468997ca42

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7158...IViXvr_s6A!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.7674...g3jwg5vczA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.9624...5XSzXy7OgQ!2e0
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