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Old 04-20-2015, 12:40 AM
 
392 posts, read 803,866 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLadyLexi25 View Post
Does anyone else think that Polish ancestry in the US is underestimated? I have noticed that in Mid-Alantic states(especially Pennsylvania), Polish surnames seem to be really common. According to US census report their is estimated 10 million people in the USA with Polish ancestry. Other reports have predicted a higher number of Americans with Polish ancestry, estimating that up to 19-20 million Americans have some Polish ancestry.

It would interesting to know if their is still any places in the USA were you can still see elements of the Polish immigration experience/culture.
The Polish population in Chicago is noticeable. You may experience the immigrant culture there, but I believe thisaspect has become less pronounced. I chalk it up to fewer immigrants, and more mixing of 2nd and 3rd generation children. As generations grow, customs are lost. In my own family, my grandparents arrived in the 70s, while my mother and I arrived in 1990. These would coincide with the political events of the country: 1970's communist leader Gierek, and the fall of communism. Background: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History..._United_States

In my experience in Chicago, you will find many Poles who can speak the language and have visited the country. There are many restaurants and stores that cater to the Polish population, as well as numerous American stores or facilities that have bilingual services in certain neighborhoods. Linguistic ghettos still exist in the city, but I surmise they are not as pronounced as before.

Further resources:

http://www.ohio.edu/chastain/dh/emigpol.htm

http://info-poland.buffalo.edu/classroom/roots.html

http://culture.polishsite.us/articles/art41fr.htm

http://www.piastinstitute.org/assets...zilowski_t.PDF
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Old 04-20-2015, 02:19 AM
 
350 posts, read 610,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLadyLexi25 View Post
Does anyone else think that Polish ancestry in the US is underestimated? I have noticed that in Mid-Alantic states(especially Pennsylvania), Polish surnames seem to be really common. According to US census report their is estimated 10 million people in the USA with Polish ancestry. Other reports have predicted a higher number of Americans with Polish ancestry, estimating that up to 19-20 million Americans have some Polish ancestry.

It would interesting to know if their is still any places in the USA were you can still see elements of the Polish immigration experience/culture.
Never heard of that and I doubt they are so many. 10 million Polish Americans is a fair number to me. Maybe you have this impression because you're from the Mid-Alantic.
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Old 04-20-2015, 03:41 AM
 
Location: Johnson Creek,WI
260 posts, read 170,213 times
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Chicago has the highest % of any city. Wisconsin has the highest% of any state. I own some property in Adams Co,WI,in the central part of the state. Their are many Polish immigrants who have moved to that area. Enough that on weekends the local FM station has weekend programming in Polish.
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Old 04-20-2015, 05:40 AM
 
32,155 posts, read 33,066,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissLadyLexi25 View Post
Does anyone else think that Polish ancestry in the US is underestimated? I have noticed that in Mid-Alantic states(especially Pennsylvania), Polish surnames seem to be really common. According to US census report their is estimated 10 million people in the USA with Polish ancestry. Other reports have predicted a higher number of Americans with Polish ancestry, estimating that up to 19-20 million Americans have some Polish ancestry.

It would interesting to know if their is still any places in the USA were you can still see elements of the Polish immigration experience/culture.
I have met Polish people in the NYC area and I believe there are even some Polish style restaurants if you look hard enough.
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:17 AM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
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In the early 20th Century, when most Poles immigrated here, Poland didn't exist; the western half of the country was part of Germany and the eastern half of the country was part of Russia. So, I'm sure there are plenty of Americans who have Polish ancestors, but think they're German or Russian.
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:35 AM
 
2,998 posts, read 4,710,470 times
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Cleveland and Buffalo
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Old 04-20-2015, 08:59 AM
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Polish here! There are a lot of Poles here. But historically, many of them are in Chicago and NYC.
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Old 04-20-2015, 06:36 PM
 
9,701 posts, read 7,278,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nightlysparrow View Post
Actually, Chicago has always been #1 in this: Demographics of Chicago - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nope. NYC has the largest Polish immigration population, and the largest population claiming Polish heritage. Chicago is second, and Philly is third. You can look it up at the Census ACS foreign-born and ancestry pages.

Chicago almost certainly has a much higher % Polish, though, as do Buffalo, Detroit, and a few others. But not in raw numbers.
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Old 04-20-2015, 10:29 PM
 
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Polish ancestry:

Chicago MSA 917,550
New York MSA 843,837

Born in Poland:

Chicago MSA 140,277
New York MSA 114,203

Chicago and New York are by far the largest centers for Polish immigrants (and if you cross the border to Canada, Toronto has about 70,000 Polish immigrants). Detroit, Cleveland, Milwaukee etc. have large Polish American populations, but have long ceased to be immigration hubs.
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Old 04-21-2015, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR -> Rocky River, OH
795 posts, read 965,386 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmd69 View Post
Cleveland and Buffalo
The only two cities who largely celebrate Polish Dyngus Day

Dyngus Day Buffalo

CLEVELAND DYNGUS ? Monday, April 6

I have a few good memories when visiting Cleveland attending sunday Polish Mass in Slavic Village...check it out, even their church bulletins are still in half Polish http://content.seekandfind.com/bulle.../20150419B.pdf
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